Lion of the Blogosphere

Ebola documentary

Hat tip to commenter “slithy toves” for linking to this VICE News documentary, The Fight Against Ebola.
There are two things that struck me most while watching.

(1) The Liberian people who work with Ebola victims say that they are doing their jobs to help their country. For them it’s not so much about helping the victims, but it’s about preventing the disease from spreading. Despite all the bad things you hear about corrupt African governments, I was quite moved by some of the genuine patriotism and self-sacrifice of the Liberians who were interviewed.

(2) Near the end of the video, the reporter interviews a doctor, and then asks if he can go into the Ebola treatment center. The doctor talks him out of it, explaining how dangerous it is and even the slightest mistake taking off your protective gear could lead you to catch Ebola.

It’s too bad that the hospitals in Spain and in Texas where the nurses caught Ebola didn’t heed some of the advice that would have been freely given by African doctors who had actual experience with the disease. There is this hubris in the West that our healthcare workers are a lot smarter than African healthcare workers, but if anything, the video shows the extreme caution the Liberians are taking with Ebola. They spray down their hazmat suits with chlorine bleach after every contact with Ebola, which is something that wasn’t initially done in the West because we keep continually underestimating Ebola.

Written by Lion of the Blogosphere

October 25, 2014 at 11:17 AM

18 Responses

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  1. Fussell was right. America is a wildly over-rated country. Self-delusion is probably our most defining trait. What good was there was due to our historic population (circa 1960) and the power of the combined talents of that population. Now we are being dismembered like some 1980s conglomerate and all our energies expended on battling little fights (Ferguson) that wouldn’t have been given a moment’s thought 40 years ago (why should such contrived highjinx dominate our public discourse?).

    You should start commenting on best places for ex-pats to relocate.

    Curle

    October 25, 2014 at 11:37 AM

    • best places for ex-pats to relocate.

      Can you supply some? I’d love to know. My own feeling is that when Americans start talking this way, they are never really serious. A very few follow up and usually return. Please don’t tell us Thailand.

      I think that one of the New England states is the best place to retire and enjoy the collapse. They are liberal but who cares. They are pleasures to live in, and you don’t have to worry yourself and pay attention to current events. I figure that a great place like New Hampshire or Maine has 50 or so years left. Plenty of time for most of us.

      GG

      October 25, 2014 at 8:23 PM

      • Uruguay. Crime rate is same as US average. Montevideo is top ranked S. American city according to Mercer Index. Economy has been on an upward climb for many years.

        Here’s the demographics for the country: Uruguayans are of predominantly European origin, with over 90.7% of the population claiming European descent in the 2011 census.[76] Most Uruguayans of European ancestry are descendants of 19th and 20th century immigrants from Spain and Italy (about one-quarter of the population is of Italian origin),[15] France, Germany and Britain.[13] Earlier settlers had migrated from Argentina.[13] People of African descent make up an even smaller proportion of the total.[13]

        Curle

        October 25, 2014 at 10:21 PM

  2. “I was quite moved by some of the genuine patriotism and self-sacrifice of the Liberians who were interviewed.”

    Patriotism, nationalism, love of country, love of your own group — these are all basic human impulses. It takes a lot of propaganda to talk you out of these things. Since Liberia doesn’t have the communications and educational infrastructure of the West, they haven’t been able to hypnotize their own people into being un-patriotic, international, haters of their country and out-group focused like in the West.

    Don’t forget that the dominant Progressive mindset is completely unnatural and entirely created by design. So much so that in the West everyone believes you are “taught” racism, when it’s 100% natural. Rather, you are “taught” anti-racism.

    peterike2

    October 25, 2014 at 11:43 AM

  3. Good point. My impression from TV is that the African hospitals know what they’re doing and are more on the ball at the moment than the US ones, they just are overwhelmed.

    rob

    October 25, 2014 at 12:45 PM

  4. American hospitals haven’t experienced anything like the West African Ebola epidemic within the last 50 years. They are set up to handle small seasonal infectious outbreaks (flu), trauma of varying severity, elective peri-operative care, and acute exacerbations of chronic disease. But with Ebola, it’s stupid to allow it even to get a foothold here. Travel bans and quarantines would be effective, but public health workers have become too influenced by progressive nonsense to implement them.

    nebbish

    October 25, 2014 at 2:00 PM

  5. If one is an HBDer then the intial understanding concerning Ebola translate to West African does not equal “white” nerd. From this, one could extrapolate that Ebola doesn’t exact the same “ferocity” while feeding upon a West African as a “white” nerd.

    thordaddy

    October 25, 2014 at 2:38 PM

  6. Practical experience and common sense trump innate intelligence.

    Sal Paradise

    October 25, 2014 at 2:49 PM

  7. all these africans speak really good english. with an accent, but still.

    rivsdiary

    October 25, 2014 at 3:27 PM

  8. Why don’t you blog about the Seattle school shooting?
    The perp was a homecoming king and a football player, who was sent into a fit of rage after a girl rejected him.
    Alpha male rage?

    AsianDude

    October 25, 2014 at 3:30 PM

  9. Frontline had a decent one: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/ebola-outbreak/

    Not overly sentimental, but hard to not empathize with the hardship and heartache those people are going through.

    anon

    October 25, 2014 at 4:50 PM

  10. People in the West spray their hazmat suits with disinfectant too, at least the ones in the army who do research on Ebola, and who worked to clean up the Ebola infested monkey house in Reston, Virginia, did. Read the book “Hot Zone”.
    http://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B007DCU4IQ?btkr=1

    Rosenmops

    October 25, 2014 at 5:48 PM

  11. OT, looks like the Romney hype is fading. http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/article/2554866

    Curle

    October 25, 2014 at 7:25 PM

  12. Article contains a perfect portrait of a pathological altruist. The quarantined nurse keeps repeating “I wondered what I had done wrong.” http://www.dallasnews.com/ebola/headlines/20141025-uta-grad-isolated-at-new-jersey-hospital-as-part-of-ebola-quarantine.ece

    Curle

    October 25, 2014 at 7:54 PM

  13. More ebola retardation: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/27/nyregion/ebola-quarantine.html

    Caption: Kaci Hickox, in an isolation tent at University Hospital in New Jersey, called her treatment in mandatory quarantine “inhumane.”

    How selfish can someone be? I don’t want to catch ebola, thanks, so you can put “voluntourism in africa” on your swpl curriculum vitae.

    Insightful commenter (possibly noticing this girl must hate hate hating beta male civilization):

    “I find it interesting that people would be so ready to put themselves at risk to try and prevent the spread of ebola in a foreign country but would be so unwilling to adhere to a 21-day quarantine in the USA to prevent the spread of the disease in their homeland. “

    jjbees

    October 27, 2014 at 2:00 AM

  14. I want to know why an entire continent needs healthcare workers from another continent to take a significant role in managing the outbreak. That’s excessively embarrassing for them in my view.

    Mark

    October 27, 2014 at 11:05 PM

  15. […] *Africans are showing quite a bit more commonsense than our own administration when it comes to the virus. We don’t give them enough credit. […]


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