Lion of the Blogosphere

NY Daily News also hates Trump

The headline reads that Donald Trump wants to “put 80,000 Americans out of work.”

But what he actually said is that he wants to simply the tax code, and by doing that he will put “H&R Block out of business.”

Although H&R Block makes a solid software product (which I use to do my own taxes because it’s too time-consuming to do it without software because the tax forms, both federal and New York State, are so complicated), their franchises which employ the 80,000 people rip everyone off by overcharging for crappy tax advice and paying the tax advisers (who are losers who can’t find a better-paying job) only a fraction of what they bill to the clients. The country would, indeed, be better off without those franchises.

Shame on the Daily News for this anti-Trump spin.

Written by Lion of the Blogosphere

August 11, 2015 at 11:31 am

Posted in Politics, Taxes

60 Responses

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  1. The Republicans can’t win the presidency without Trump now, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eptDBWQPR5Y

    NotWesley

    August 11, 2015 at 12:24 pm

  2. Right, meanwhile Ted Cruz wants to “abolish the IRS” which would really leave the poor schleps at H&R Block in the lurch. Of course, Cruz’s little scheme would also take out the Big 4 accounting firms and who’s knows how many biglaw tax sections, but apparently Cruz’s words mean nothing to the Daily News.

    Meanwhile- poor Republicans- they spend the last twenty five years training a dog to be mean and now they’re shocked when it bites them in the ass.

    99% man - 1% amazing

    August 11, 2015 at 12:47 pm

    • Abolishing the IRS is stupid, stupid, stupid. What a moron. How can a government collect taxes without an agency to do that?

      Lion of the Blogosphere

      August 11, 2015 at 12:55 pm

      • The personal income tax system in other countries is pretty simple, compared to others. The Byzantine complexity of our personal income tax system, with all of its deduction loopholes, credits, and a host of other unnecessary things, should be eliminated.

        But here’s the catch, by doing this, the tax preparation industry will come to a near collapse, not only do billionaire dollar corporations like Turbo Tax go out of business, the run in the mill accountant, lawyer, and the staff at the IRS, will be out of a job.

        JS

        August 11, 2015 at 4:33 pm

      • The vast marority of lawyers at the IRS are doing complicated corporate law stuff that’s unlikely to change. Trump, I presume, means that he’s going to make personal income taxes a lot simpler.

        Lion of the Blogosphere

        August 11, 2015 at 6:07 pm

      • * compared to ours

        JS

        August 11, 2015 at 4:33 pm

      • Lion,
        I work in public accounting (on the audit side though). The number of smart people in this country that are wasted on working within the tax system is a complete national embarassment. We have literally hundreds of incredibly bright people working in our tax group alone. It’s a total net drain on our wealth and our social capital. No one within the system will ever fix it. That’s why I would support even someone as crass and buffoon-like as Trump. At this point, I don’t care about reform. The system isn’t reformable. Let it burn and we can start over.

        JerseyGuy

        August 11, 2015 at 7:30 pm

      • When the US Treasury issues bonds, it’s basically just printing money. That means the central gov’t doesn’t have to collect taxes. They can and do finance most of their operations just by expanding the national debt.

        The federal income tax is a remnant from when there was a gold standard, and today a means for progressive social engineering.

        Lowe

        August 12, 2015 at 2:21 pm

    • Big accounting firms do more than tax prep.

      Dave Pinsen

      August 11, 2015 at 1:30 pm

      • Even if they only did taxes, they’re still accountants. They’ll land on their feet as long as it’s phased out rather than axed all at once.

        destructure

        August 11, 2015 at 11:40 pm

  3. If you watch the Mclaughlin Group you can see that Mortimer Zuckerman (who owns the Daily News) hates Trump. He said that if Clinton and Bush are the two candidates he’ll go to bed early on election night knowing that the country is in fine hands. Buchanan confronted him about the anti Trump bias of the paper and he responded that he exerts no influence whatsoever on the Daily News, which seems pretty unlikely.

    Lloyd Llewellyn

    August 11, 2015 at 12:49 pm

    • Mort is for open borders, which is why he opposes Trump. Same with Rupert Murdoch.

      Dave Pinsen

      August 11, 2015 at 1:32 pm

  4. It’s funny that you think their software is solid but their advisors are crappy – their advisors use H&R Block software too. I use them (one in particular – a sharp Korean lady), because their home software doesn’t support businesses like it says it does. It’s expensive, but for non businesses owners, they have an option where you can use the home software and have an advisor review it for an extra $5 or $10 or something.

    Kind of obnoxious to call everyone who works there a loser though. I don’t think my Korean woman is a loser.

    Dave Pinsen

    August 11, 2015 at 1:29 pm

    • women who date guys that comment on hbd forums aren’t exactly female alphas.

      GM

      August 11, 2015 at 4:05 pm

      • Your reading comprehension is lacking. The “my Korean woman” in the second paragraph of my comment refers to my H&R block tax advisor mentioned in the first paragraph (“one in particular – a sharp Korean lady”). I am not dating her.

        Dave Pinsen

        August 11, 2015 at 8:07 pm

    • H&R Block has a large NAM staff. I’ve stepped into one of their offices before, and noticed an overrepresentation of blacks working for them. That alone tells you that H&R Block is low end or a prole joint, like McDonalds or any corporate retail outlet.

      JS

      August 11, 2015 at 4:21 pm

      • Once I used H&R block on 15 of April so as not to lose a refund from 3 years earlier. Had to walk a NAM woman doing my return through it. Dumb place, one more feather in Trump’s hat for wanting to put them out of business.
        I use Quicken, good product.

        Yakov

        August 12, 2015 at 12:16 am

      • H&R Block was founded by guys who are now billionaires. I would assume the early years of its existence was staffed by polite Whites who were competent. The tax laws have gotten more complicated ever since, and the people working for this company are mostly rude NAMs. It’s quite fascinating that one can observe the many corporate retail outlets, and make a prediction, as to when the demise of America will happen.

        JS

        August 12, 2015 at 11:12 am

      • Lots of NAMs in NAM country, sure, but not everywhere. Where I work there are retired accountants, teachers, a few PhDs, JDs, and whatnot. Don’t ask…

        Anyway HRB’s role is to shovel taxpayer freebies to the poors. I don’t know what Trump could do to simplify things without eliminating some pretty popular features. There never seems to be any details to these plans. Are we doing away with deductions, exemptions, adjustments, refundable credits etc? Several sweet business writeoffs like bonus depreciation are already gone.

        Mrs Stitch

        August 12, 2015 at 6:46 pm

  5. I worked for Jackson-Hewitt. We were told to try and get everyone to take their refund as a loan from us. The “value,” to the customer was receiving money today rather than wait for Treasury to cut you a check.

    I told customers they shouldn’t take the loan, then told my boss customers weren’t interested. I didn’t get a bonus.

    dsgntd_plyr

    August 11, 2015 at 3:42 pm

    • How much did you get paid, and how much did your employer charge the customer?

      Lion of the Blogosphere

      August 11, 2015 at 3:43 pm

      • I believe any street corner tax prep company, which isn’t H&R Block, would be even more loserish, given their lack of credibility, when compared to a loserish company like H&R Block.

        But yes, tax preparation like other professional parasitism fields (Accounting, Law, Finance) is a value transference industry, which means, there is no need for it, in terms of real value to society.

        JS

        August 11, 2015 at 4:25 pm

      • Accounting involves more than just tax preparation. Even tax preparation is a worthy field because society reflects its values in what it chooses to tax and helping align people’s behaviors with those values and ensuring that they’re rewarded is a good thing. Don’t blame accountants for the fact that we have really terrible values. The same basic argument applies to Lawyers. And Finance has a very important core function with a bunch of other useless parasitic elements on top of it.

        Lloyd Llewellyn

        August 11, 2015 at 7:50 pm

      • About $14.5/h

        dsgntd_plyr

        August 11, 2015 at 9:20 pm

      • $14.50 an hour? On a check? How many years ago was that?

        Yakov

        August 12, 2015 at 1:41 am

    • You are a mencsh.

      Yakov

      August 12, 2015 at 12:17 am

  6. The center would be easily won over by anyone espousing populist principles in a non-mean-spirted way but all the elite — right and left, the far left, and the social conservative right hate, hate, hate populist positions. Trump tapped into just a little bit of the populist ideology with immigration, and see how popular he is in spite of his many flaws.

    CamelCaseRob

    August 11, 2015 at 3:55 pm

  7. Lion – I’m a bit surprised as to why you find doing your own taxes to be a complicated endeavor, since you graduated from law school and passed the bar exam, dealing with the artificial, legalistic, jargon, day in and day out.

    Reading David Siegel’s law book, New York Practice, that deals with the insane NYS legal system, is 100 times worse, than persuing the IRS code, instructions, rules and regulations.

    JS

    August 11, 2015 at 6:51 pm

    • It’s not something I can’t figure out, it’s something that’s very time consuming and a huge PITA, and the software makes it a lot faster.

      Lion of the Blogosphere

      August 11, 2015 at 7:57 pm

      • You’ve got city income tax too in NYC don’t you? Gad I can’t even imagine….

        Mrs Stitch

        August 12, 2015 at 7:04 pm

      • If you have a small unincorporated business in NYC, earning more than $95,000, here’s what you have to paid, when it comes to taxes:

        1) Federal Income and Self Employment Tax (Form 1040)
        2) NYS and NYC Income Tax (Form IT-201)
        3) Metropolitan Commuter Transportation Mobility Tax (known as the MTA tax)
        4) Unincorporated Business Tax (Form NYC-202)
        5) NYS LLC Fee of $25 or more (if you are set up as a LLC)

        Disgusting, and that’s the price you paid to live in NYC, so you can subsidize the corrupt politicos and NAM miscreants.

        JS

        August 13, 2015 at 9:54 am

  8. I’ve heard tgat the IRSwill actually prepare your returns for you. Is that true.

    Jack Benny

    August 11, 2015 at 7:24 pm

  9. Of course these companies are prole. H&R Block is actually a significant step up from the lowest.

    There is some smallish chain in my area, something like Liberty Tax Services, that operates out of really low square footage stores in strip malls long past their prime. For the first several months of every year they send an employee out to the side of the road dressed in a cheap Statue of Liberty costume. That person dances around and obnoxiously waves a sign advertising their services. Has a distinct pawn store vibe.

    anon

    August 11, 2015 at 7:34 pm

    • Was the employee a NAM dressed up as the Statue of Liberty? It’s usually the case here in NYC.

      JS

      August 12, 2015 at 11:14 am

  10. put “H&R Block out of business.”

    Trump’s plan to simplify the tax code would also put those “losers” that stand on the sidewalk in front of Liberty Tax dressed as the Statue of Liberty during tax season out of work. And beside, whatever happened to Neal Boortz’ “Fair Tax” plan?

    LotB: Although H&R Block makes a solid software product (which I use to do my own taxes because it’s too time-consuming to do it without software because the tax forms, both federal and New York State, are so complicated)

    I’ve never used tax prep software, but with my new rental property it looks like I’m going to have to start.

    E. Rekshun

    August 11, 2015 at 7:51 pm

    • The Fair Tax actually makes a lot of sense (and its “prebate” could easily be shifted into a basic income guarantee), but, as LOTB suggested, whatever tax plan you have will require some agency to administer it. But, conceivably, the simpler the tax structure, the less potential for the agency to be politicized, as in Louis Lerner’s targeting of conservative orgs.

      As for rental property, H&R block software may be able to accommodate that. Best thing to do is use their “best of both worlds” feature, so you can get your return fixed by an advisor using their more powerful software if it doesn’t.

      Dave Pinsen

      August 11, 2015 at 8:15 pm

    • The FairTax is an awful idea. It is enormously regressive for middle- and upper-middle class types because beyond a certain point, there is only so much that a consumption tax can capture. Among the upper class, as income increases, consumption as % of total wealth declines (there is, after all, only so much one can spend, and multibillionaires and multimillionaires’ expenses aren’t so different). The effect is actually extremely pernicious in terms of entrenching whatever elite happens to be in power upon its coming into effect.

      In other words, if you’re happy being subservient to the subhuman, moronic savages that presently run this country, vote Huckabee.

      Viscount Douchenozzlé

      August 11, 2015 at 8:35 pm

      • The prebate makes the Fair Tax progressive, and, anyway, our current income tax system is highly progressive as it is. If you want to tax wealth, you can add an asset tax (like Florida has), if you can get one passed.

        But saying a tax plan is awful because it won’t topple the elite is stupid. No tax plan enacted in a country with a modicum of rule of law would do that.

        Dave Pinsen

        August 12, 2015 at 1:50 am

      • But saying a tax plan is awful because it won’t topple the elite is stupid.

        Who said that? All I said was that it entrenches whatever elite happens to be in place when it takes effect, which it does. The prebate is only sufficient to help the lower classes, who in most cases aren’t net taxpayers in any case; the people it disadvantages relative to the extreme right of the income distribution are those making high incomes, but not necessarily living off the interest from their wealth e.g., professionals and small business owners; the 1% – 0.5%, as it were, while protecting and entrenching the 0.01%.

        I’m not advocating for the revolution here. I’m just pointing out the failings of this utterly ridiculous conservative darling because it’s an unnecessary and perhaps even purposefully regressive propaganda tool.

        Viscount Douchenozzlé

        August 12, 2015 at 9:12 am

      • Who said that? All I said was that it entrenches whatever elite happens to be in place when it takes effect, which it does.

        Taxes don’t entrench elites and changing taxes doesn’t dislodge them. The Rockefellers have been rich for over a century, during which time US taxes have changed radically.

        Dave Pinsen

        August 12, 2015 at 4:57 pm

      • My god, you people and your low future time horizon behaviours and mindsets. Sure, taxes are irrelevant and capital accumulation is just magic. Have it your way. Taxes do, in fact, make a difference for wealth accumulation; you, clearly don’t have enough money to notice, though, which makes this discussion all the more hilarious and sad.

        Viscount Douchenozzlé

        August 12, 2015 at 8:08 pm

      • My god, you people and your low future time horizon behaviours and mindsets. Sure, taxes are irrelevant and capital accumulation is just magic. Have it your way. Taxes do, in fact, make a difference for wealth accumulation; you, clearly don’t have enough money to notice, though, which makes this discussion all the more hilarious and sad.

        Taxes in America have changed radically since the mid-19th century, and yet families that started building wealth then (Rockefellers, Guggenheims, etc.) are still wealthy today — even after the advent of estate taxes, income taxes, capital gains, taxes, etc. Which refutes your argument. In fact, I doubt you can name one wealthy family whose wealth evaporated due to changes in American tax law.

        The ultra wealthy don’t spend a lot of time thinking about taxes. That’s an upper middle class thing. The ones who inherit massive wealth have family offices that handle everything, and the ones who build massive wealth don’t spend a lot of time thinking about taxes either.

        IIRC, Mark Cuban wrote that he didn’t make any decision based on tax rates when he started his businesses. It’s people like Rand Paul and Jack Kemp who think tweaking the tax code will make the ghettoes bloom. That’s magical thinking, as is your idea that changing the tax code is going to make the Rockefellers or Sergei Brin or materially less rich.

        Dave Pinsen

        August 13, 2015 at 5:54 am

      • The ultra wealthy don’t spend a lot of time thinking about taxes. That’s an upper middle class thing.

        Actually, that’s my point – and as a result the UMC is less upwardly mobile because a greater percentage of their wealth is taxed as income rather than as capital gains, dividends, or interest. Of course, the reason the tax structure exists as it does, and the reason the TOOS don’t worry much about taxes is because they have the most effective means to manipulate policy. And that policy, in turn, serves to entrench their position, and the FairTax is just another propaganda tool in that vein because, as I mentioned earlier, as wealth increases, consumption as % of total wealth declines, and drastically so.

        The answer, if one believes in true egalitarianism and the advancement of humanity, is a wealth tax that captures things like unrealized capital gains, in addition to limits on utterly ridiculous deductions like the 1031 exchange (incidentally, one of the main reasons why the art market in America has entered an unprecedented boom) the carried interest loophole, and all of the ridiculous fake family charitable foundations and other pass-through entities. We won’t get that, though.

        Of course, your counterargument is going to involve historical tax rates & etc. What most people who make that argument tend to forget, though, is that the list of potential deductions in the past was even longer than it was now. There were virtually unlimited deductions for business expenses with only the most minimal oversight; one might even deduct the entirety of the construction of one’s personal estate if the correct procedure was followed!

        In summary, the TOOS will always try to rig the game in their favor. Currently they do this by means of deductions that could be eliminated and loopholes that could be closed. Already, for example, Obama seems to be taking aim at the 1031 exchange. The FairTax, however, eliminates those legislative means of increasing receivables and, as before, permits the elite to pay a similarly low effective rate without any means to ever increase that rate.

        Viscount Douchenozzlé

        August 13, 2015 at 1:54 pm

      • Actually, that’s my point – and as a result the UMC is less upwardly mobile because a greater percentage of their wealth is taxed as income rather than as capital gains, dividends, or interest.

        Taxes have little to do with whether a member of the upper middle class becomes TOOS (or TIS: “Top In Sight”, for the famous ones). Mark Zuckerberg did it because he founded a $260 billion company. Had nothing to do with the tax code. You aren’t going to go from UMC to TOOS unless you marry a TOOS, win the Powerball lottery, or build a highly successful business. And wealth isn’t taxed as income.

        Of course, the reason the tax structure exists as it does, and the reason the TOOS don’t worry much about taxes is because they have the most effective means to manipulate policy. And that policy, in turn, serves to entrench their position…

        Again, no. This isn’t opinion, it’s historical fact. The tax structure exists as it does in large part due to Progressives, who, starting in the late 19th Century, had similar envy and hostility toward the upper class that you do. That’s when things like inheritance taxes started getting enacted at the state level. When the Rockefellers and the Guggenheims got started there were hardly any taxes (and hardly any need for them, since, outside of wartime, the government was comparatively tiny and did little), and they weren’t agitating for there to be more of them as a means to hold people like you down. They didn’t need to hold anyone down. Down is most people’s natural state! It took progressive policies such as minimum wages, limited working hours, restricted immigration, unions, social security, etc., to elevate the average man from downtrodden to a more of a middle class existence.

        The answer, if one believes in true egalitarianism and the advancement of humanity…

        This is muddled thinking. These things all happened together from the late 19th Century to the late 20th Century:

        1) The rich got richer.

        2) Taxes went up a lot.

        3) Humanity advanced.

        Of course, your counterargument is going to involve historical tax rates & etc. What most people who make that argument tend to forget, though, is that the list of potential deductions in the past was even longer than it was now.

        There was no need for deductions in the mid-19th century because there were hardly any taxes. Rockefeller got rich then, and despite all the taxes thought up by progressives over the last century and a half, his descendants are still rich. Today, there are lots of taxes, and Zuckerberg still got rich. No future titan of industry was ever held back by taxes in America.

        The FairTax, however, eliminates those legislative means of increasing receivables

        Governments don’t have “receivables”. They have revenues, which are, for the most part, taxes. And the Fair Tax doesn’t preclude the government from levying other taxes. As I said above, you could always campaign to add a separate wealth tax if you want, but any wealth tax enacted won’t make the TOOS materially poorer, because it will be at a low enough rate to not scare away capital.

        The point of taxes is to fund government, and smart tax policy is one that will do so equitably, progressively (because, it has to be, politically), and with a minimum of drag on the economy. The Fair Tax can do all that (even though the rate is flat, the prebate makes it progressive). And, as I mentioned before, you can easily turn the prebate into a basic income guarantee, by raising it to, say, 110% of the poverty line. So someone at less than 110% of the poverty line would have an effective tax rate of -100%. Can’t get much more progressive than that! You’d be able to save as much as you want, tax free, to build capital, and you could reduce the amount of Fair Tax you paid by purchasing used goods, which, IIRC, would be untaxed.

        Dave Pinsen

        August 14, 2015 at 2:40 am

      • I can assure you my critique of the FairTax arises from the contemptible irresponsibility of this country’s upper class rather than my own envy. There’s little to envy about a family, for example, so terminally rotten, corrupt and exploitative of their position as oligarchs that they compel an entire nation to one of the most expensive wars in human history under entirely false, invented pretenses. I certainly wouldn’t envy that: I have a conscience. I also have ancestors who were forced to flee Russia against threat of death during an enormously destructive revolution caused by similar overreach and exploitation of an entrenched elite; a revolution that was in fact masterminded and enabled by elements of that country’s exploited lower, middle and even upper-middle classes, so the inevitable reaction to such behaviour is more clear to me than to most. Also, having lived in the Germanic world for several years in the past it strikes me that the European upper class exercise a much greater sense of responsible stewardship toward their fellow citizens than do the Americans.

        The fact remains that a much greater percentage of the UMC’s wealth is taxed as income while the elite can pay a much lower rate through a variety of tax dodges. Stating that “wealth isn’t taxed as income” simply glosses over that point, which is significant. This is still anticompetitive vis a vis the upper middle and professional class, and we both know that little giveaways to the lowest echelons of society via the prebate can’t solve that.

        Perhaps I’m old, but I can tell you that I recall a time when this government had to compete for the hearts and minds of its citizens; to prove that capitalism was in fact the optimal route to human advancement and prosperity. I recall, for example, a time when this government didn’t find it necessary to provide enormous incentives for the outsourcing of American jobs or permit the substitution of American labor with foreigners treated like indentured servants as we do today with the H1-B programme and with illegal labor; when finding government funding for the arts, for scientific research, for education was far less difficult than today. All of this – this false illusion of what free market capitalism is – was wound down throughout the 1990s once the Cold War ended.

        I have money, and own a strong business; the availability of low-level software development or factory work isn’t a concern for me personally. Nevertheless, I exercise my basic duty of responsibility toward fellow Americans in my own life by sourcing from American suppliers whenever possible, even when it costs a bit more, and by paying my employees fairly. But when I see, for example, the venomous attitude that some on here take towards blacks when the reality is that they’ve been systematically priced out of the labor market by employers who substitute them ad infinitum with illegals who are paid half minimum wage and can literally be maimed or killed on the job without the full recourse offered by US law, I step back and think. And the elephant in the room is tax policy. Both the FairTax, as well as the current tax code to a slightly lesser degree, serve to entrench the current milieu in which a small elite make all important policy decisions and the value of labor is on a swift downward trendline BECAUSE the return on accumulated capital is practically unchecked. I appreciate your spirited debate, but if history provides any indication, this won’t end well.

        Viscount Douchenozzlé

        August 14, 2015 at 11:35 am

      • Also, in:re muddled thinking:

        As I read this conversation, it becomes apparent to me that you’re responding primarily not to me, but to your projections on what the implications of my statements might be. This is, strictly speaking, a mistake of logic.

        Other items:
        Used goods – will increase in price relative to the consumption tax; I presume you know that already
        UMC becoming TOOS/TIS – not what I discussed; rather, the FairTax being regressive for the UMC vs. the elite due to the source and relative taxation of their wealth
        Dislodging elites – also not discussed; however increasing the wealth and thereby power of the UMC was
        mid-19th c. tax deductions – have a look at the mid-20th century instead, when the top rate was 90% with deductions galore to be had
        Rant against minimum wages, min working hours, immigration, child labor laws (added that one for you, since it was missing from your 19th century utopia): as Fitzgerald noted, ” a sense of the fundamental decencies is parcelled out unequally at birth.”

        Viscount Douchenozzlé

        August 14, 2015 at 12:49 pm

  11. Bush’s poll numbers are drifting nicely into 5th – 8th place oblivion. The nomination is boiling down to Trump vs Cruz vs Walker. If the latter two are to beat Trump they can do so only by getting to his right on immigration.

    The Undiscovered Jew

    August 11, 2015 at 11:13 pm

    • Nether Cruz nor Walker can beat Trump. Trump is a breath of fresh air – that’s the difference.

      Yakov

      August 12, 2015 at 1:43 am

      • He is so desperate to change the subject from immigration that he’s taking about Iraq.

        Dave Pinsen

        August 12, 2015 at 8:58 am

    • Don’t count out Carly Fiorina.

      CamelCaseRob

      August 12, 2015 at 10:53 am

      • Carly makes Hillary seem likeable. She’d be a disaster.

        Dave Pinsen

        August 12, 2015 at 4:58 pm

      • She impressed everybody I’ve talked to, male and female, in the debates.

        CamelCaseRob

        August 12, 2015 at 5:37 pm

      • She impresses people who don’t know anything about her. Wait til the ex HP employees start talking.

        Mrs Stitch

        August 12, 2015 at 7:08 pm

      • HP employees hate Fiorina rather passionately, so it seems she would be unsuitable. But what if we could apply that skill set to the permanent bureaucracy?

        Glengarry

        August 13, 2015 at 7:26 pm

  12. Wow! This is getting very entertaining!

    GOP Elites Call for Purge of Trump – The Unz Review
    http://www.unz.com/pbuchanan/gop-elites-call-for-purge-of-trump/

    “‘A political party has a right to … secure its borders,” asserts the Post’s George Will, “a duty to exclude interlopers.’ Will wants The Donald “excommunicated” and locked out of all GOP debates until he kneels and takes a loyalty oath to the nominee.”

    […]

    “Trump’s followers are ‘xenophobic,’ Gerson tells CNN. They have a ‘resentment of outsiders, of Mexico, of China, and immigrants. That’s more like a European right-wing party, a UKIP or a National Front in France. Republicans can’t incorporate that.'”

    Whatta hurtful thing to say.

    aandrews

    August 15, 2015 at 1:47 pm

    • Besides, I’m not even a “follower”. I’m just channeling my hippie-esque positive energy his direction.

      aandrews

      August 15, 2015 at 1:50 pm


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