Lion of the Blogosphere

The corniest post ever

The ear was bought earlier today at a farmstand at a farm in New Jersey, so presumably it was picked earlier today.

Why is it called an ear? It doesn’t look anything like an ear. I tried to talk to the ear, but there was no indication that it actually heard me.

The good stuff was wrapped inside a huge number big green leafy things (the corn husk, I presume). There were also a bunch of weird looking stringy things inside the husk. After removing all of that husky stuff, the ear was considerably smaller than I had anticipated. I cut it in half because the entire length of the ear was too big for my small pot of water, which I brought to a boil.

After letting the corn cook in water for five or six minutes, I took it out, and ate it with butter.

Wow! It tasted great! I never tasted anything like it before. The corn from supermarkets is obviously a poor substitute for genuine farmstand corn.

I think this is a paleo food, because the hunter-gatherer Indians (the Indians from America, and not those people in southern Asia who are stealing all of the IT jobs from unemployed Americans) ate it.

Written by Lion of the Blogosphere

August 28, 2015 at 9:10 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

72 Responses

Subscribe to comments with RSS.

  1. Corn is like espresso anything but fresh is a shadow of what it could be, I know some old-time farmers, they talk about boiling the water in the kitchen before they pick the corn from the field right outside, while the water is boiling they go get the corn from the stalk, apparently the taste is great.

    howitzer daniel

    August 28, 2015 at 9:43 pm

    • Actually modern supermarket corn is bred with a huge surplus of sugar to compensate for what’s lost during shipping and storage so fresh corn would actually taste worse. As for heritage varieties I imagine that does taste better but I don’t have any first hand experience.

      Lloyd Llewellyn

      August 29, 2015 at 2:05 am

      • L-L- : Good point I was relaying information from farmers who left the farm in the 30s or the 40s at the latest.

        howitzer daniel

        August 29, 2015 at 6:20 pm

  2. “The corn from supermarkets is obviously a poor substitute for genuine farmstand corn.”

    This is true!

    “I think this is a paleo food, because the hunter-gatherer Indians (the Indians from America, and not those people in southern Asia who are stealing all of the IT jobs from unemployed Americans) ate it.”

    This is wrong. I’m sure other posters will explain why.

    gold eagles, 30-06 shells, and SPAM are the currency of tomorrow!

    August 28, 2015 at 9:44 pm

    • ,308, .223 and .22LR are likely to be more valuable as currency if the SHTF.

      Some Guy

      August 29, 2015 at 9:27 pm

    • I haven’t read much on Paleo, but I don’t think “hunter-gatherers” gathered much corn. When De Soto explored the U.S. South around 1550, only the more advanced Indians had corn — and they grew it, they didn’t gather it.

      CamelCaseRob

      August 30, 2015 at 8:17 am

  3. There are well-known comedy routines where the country bumpkin describes his trip to the city. Lion has been inspired to do the reverse. Bravo! Greetings and congratulations from the Midwest corn belt Lion. Enjoy your delicious ear. The hair is called silk, it forms the tassel.

    steve@steve.com

    August 28, 2015 at 10:29 pm

    • The hair is called silk but it does not form the tassel. The tassel forms at the top of the stalk and holds the pollen. The pollen then falls off the tassel and lands on the silk, each one of which is connected to a kernel. That is how the corn is pollinated. If the tassel misses the silk (which happens sometimes when it is too dry and the tassel doesn’t push out in time), then you end up with no kernels or maybe just a sparse few kernels if only a little bit of pollen was able to reach the silk. It rarely happens as the corn is bred up now to deal with drought better.

      This is not paleo food as modern corn bares no resembles to paleo times. First of all corn is a derivative of maze which doesn’t look anything like corn. What you see growing in fields today did not exist in paleo times. It was bred to look and produce like that. Second of all what you eat is what is called “sweet corn” This is not what you see growing in the fields across the corn belt. Sweet corn is a modern invention that is specifically bred to have considerably higher sugar content than typical field corn from which your corn flakes and corn tortilas are made. All canned corn is also “sweet” corn, but it is by far a small majority of all the corn grown. Corn is the super market is the same sweet corn as what you buy in the field but some varieties are better than others and shipping and storage makes it worse as well. Supermarket corn is far better than it used to be but it is still likely not to be as good as straight out of the local field. However I have had some super market corn that was very close. It is usually later in season when the super market corn is more local. If it is shipped in from across the country it is not a good substitute.

      Apex

      August 31, 2015 at 10:59 am

  4. Know how I know you aren’t Italian?

    Your pot can’t fit an ear of corn.

    How can you cook lots of pasta with a tiny pot like that? It’s time to go become Italian, lion.

    jjbees

    August 28, 2015 at 10:33 pm

    • Im sure maryk would lend him a corn pot

      Lloyd Llewellyn

      August 29, 2015 at 2:10 am

    • Im sure maryk would lend him a corn pot

      Or hit him over the head with one.

      The Undiscovered Jew

      August 29, 2015 at 10:00 pm

  5. Why is it called an ear? It doesn’t look anything like an ear. I tried to talk to the ear, but there was no indication that it actually heard me.

    Lawyer, blogger and appearing next week at “Chuckles”, two shows 8-11 Fri-Sat-Sun.

    Rifleman

    August 28, 2015 at 10:35 pm

    • They should call it round-tine.

      J1

      August 29, 2015 at 4:15 pm

  6. But the paleo guys usually don’t like carbohydrates…which corn for the most part is. Until you add butter…so add lots (though butter isn’t particularly paleo – is there even any evidence that butter existed in the Paleolithic period? It seems to have been a Neolithic innovation.)

    Graf von Jung

    August 28, 2015 at 11:00 pm

  7. because the hunter-gatherer Indians

    It wasn’t the same corn we have today. Only recently has the evil cis-gendered European type guy selectively bred a corn that is sweet enough to eat right off the cob. Previously corn was ground into flour.

    bomag

    August 28, 2015 at 11:05 pm

    • Fresh corn can’t be stored which is why they dried it and turned it into corn meal.

      T

      August 29, 2015 at 12:06 am

    • That’s not what this says: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweet_corn . Native Americans were great plant breeders and all the great european cooking traditions are built around ingredients from the new world.

      Lloyd Llewellyn

      August 29, 2015 at 2:16 am

      • That used to be something that Americans took great pride in.

        Lloyd Llewellyn

        August 29, 2015 at 2:16 am

      • Hybridization made corn a dominant crop.

        bomag

        August 29, 2015 at 4:14 pm

    • It does look like an ear when it’s on the stalk. Think of how ears stick out on little boys with short hair.
      This journey sounds like something a woman probably dragged you to.

      Sheila Tone

      August 29, 2015 at 5:57 pm

  8. If I recall correctly Loren Cordain claims that corn isn’t paleo because you can’t eat it raw. But I’ve gone into corn fields several times and eaten corn raw with my kids and it was delicious and nothing bad happened to anyone.

    ami

    August 29, 2015 at 2:06 am

    • Fresh corn is digestible. Mature corn, not so much without processing.

      bomag

      August 29, 2015 at 4:15 pm

  9. The two “ear”s have different etymological origins.

    Francis

    August 29, 2015 at 8:23 am

  10. Corn is a grain; therefore not paleo.

    Fresh corn is rather amazing.

    Max

    August 29, 2015 at 9:15 am

    • Fresh corn is generally not considered to be a grain. Grains are hard.

      Lloyd Llewellyn

      August 29, 2015 at 8:08 pm

  11. Boiling for 5-6 minutes is overcooking. I put the ears in at the start and when it comes to full boil, turn off heat and cover until served (which should be within a few minutes). Then again, when I was a barefoot bumpkin running around the Georgia fields and woods of my youth, we’d sneak into the silver queen fields and eat it raw. That silver queen sure was sweet as candy.

    Corn never really caught on in Asia, but the sweet potato (another new world crop) was important in Chinese history.

    Polentone

    August 29, 2015 at 9:32 am

  12. Corn is a product of Native American agriculture, i.e. the people who first cultivated it were no longer hunters and gatherers.

    Gilbert Ratchet

    August 29, 2015 at 9:54 am

  13. The Indians wouldn’t have eaten fresh corn as their staple. They first ‘nixtamalized’ it, curing it in lime to make additional nutrients available, to prevent nutrient deficiencies from living on corn. Then can came the eating (as hominy) or drying and grinding into flour.

    There was nothing ‘paleo’ about Indians that relied heavily on corn. They were settled peoples that lived in dense populations.
    By the time European settlers arrived in earnest Indians had been through an apocalypse of mass epidemics from first contact, giving us the myth that they were mainly small bands living in the forest.

    Giovanni Dannato

    August 29, 2015 at 10:10 am

    • It appears that the “Mongoloid” strain is less discernible among White Americans, than White Canadians, especially French Canadians, and most certainly in the case of Latin America. This means only one thing, Whites in America, hated the Indians with a passion, and found them to be a pestilence that needed to be eradicated.

      The question begs to be asked, is why America is such a toxic place, filled with hateful racists, and non-integrationists. Is it strictly an Anglosphere disease? And it has gotten worse, because America’s sole objective is really about money in spite of everything else, and the capitalists don’t discriminate when it comes exploiting certain groups and paying them low wages. They need to divide and conquer, in order profits are made in the utmost efficiency. The same reason why our factories are stationed in China, and why menial work are mostly for non-Whites. I could also make a case that there are too many blacks in America for assimilation to happen, for any smooth transition to an unified nation to happen.

      JS

      August 29, 2015 at 12:16 pm

      • Here’s an astrological reason, as to why America, is full of contradictions and hypocrisy, and a failure in the long haul.

        Looking at the natal birth chart of the United States, it has the planet Neptune, which symbolizes idealism and ideology, in its placement in Virgo, a sign which symbolizes pragmatism and and realism. Idealism and pragmatism are opposites. The same reason as to why higher education, equal opportunity for all, the American Dream, etc…have become utter failures.

        JS

        August 29, 2015 at 2:38 pm

      • why America is such a toxic place

        You have to be toxic to survive. The future belongs to toxic places. Toxic places export their people to colonize other places. Nobody moves to toxic places.

        bomag

        August 29, 2015 at 4:21 pm

    • I’ve been pretty much living off of proper masa harina tortillas for the last few months. I swear I feel better eating that stuff.

      SWPLs talk about gardening for greater self sufficiency and grow a bunch of salad greens and artichokes. Corn and potatoes are the only way you’d have a prayer of feeding yourself. Everything else is pretty much a waste of time; at best garnish.

      joeyjoejoe

      August 29, 2015 at 1:39 pm

      • watch out, you could develop pellagra if you really are eating mostly mas harina.

        Mrs Stitch

        August 29, 2015 at 4:54 pm

      • Incorrect. Masa is nixtamalized and does not bind nutrients to any problematic degree.

        joeyjoejoe

        August 29, 2015 at 6:17 pm

      • Corn and potatoes absolutely blow the competition away (vegetable and animal) when it comes to calories per acre required to produce.

        Polentone

        August 30, 2015 at 9:53 am

    • “I could also make a case that there are too many blacks in America for assimilation to happen.”

      I’d argue that Lincoln made your case for you. He sought to end slavery in the territories to quell northern concerns that a growing population of black slaves (to work the territories) would one day be freed and would migrate to the more prosperous North and cause havoc there. As it turns out, happened anyway.

      Curle

      August 29, 2015 at 8:11 pm

  14. My husband cooks corn in the husk with the microwave. It comes out really good, better than boiled. But it’s kind of messy to unwrap, but he holds it using a silicone mitt while he strips off the husk and cornsilk.

    Mrs Stitch

    August 29, 2015 at 1:10 pm

  15. You can roast corn still in its husk in the oven. It’s less messy than boiling a cauldron of water. 350 F for 30 minutes. I line the ears up on a cookie sheet.

    slithy toves

    August 29, 2015 at 1:23 pm

  16. Lion, I was bemused to read your description of your naive experience with corn on the cob. It was common in my upbringing, and I always assumed it cut across class lines. Was I wrong? Is eating corn on the cob typically limited to the prole goyim?

    Hermes

    August 29, 2015 at 1:24 pm

    • Wrong, It is mainly a mid-west corn belt thing. As a kid growing up in the midwest. I remember arguments at my parent’s heavily Jewish country club about which of the 10 corn stands that were close had the best corn and the proper way to prepare it. Jews are into good food wherever they are.

      Larry, San Francisco

      August 29, 2015 at 2:29 pm

      • Corn is not a corn belt thing. Go into any grocery store anywhere in the US and you will find corn on the cob in the husk.

        T

        August 29, 2015 at 5:31 pm

      • I grew up in suburban Philadelphia.

        Hermes

        August 29, 2015 at 10:34 pm

    • Jews outside of NYC eat corn on the cob, or at least my family did when I was growing up.

      nebbish

      August 29, 2015 at 4:19 pm

  17. Make chicha, hombre.

    La Raza

    August 29, 2015 at 1:26 pm

  18. Peter Akuleyev

    August 29, 2015 at 5:04 pm

    • Wow!

      Lion of the Blogosphere

      August 29, 2015 at 5:31 pm

      • What was holding things up, it turned out, was that the ID plate that should have been attached to the inboard edge of the flaperon was missing. And that was not the only problem. According to the New York Times, Boeing and the National Transportation Safety Board found that the object did not match Malaysia Airlines’ maintenance records.

        I don’t see this and the other things mentioned in the article as deal breakers per the part being from MH370.

        bomag

        August 29, 2015 at 9:39 pm

  19. Why do you hate Indians from India? Did an Indian person take your job?

    Pretentious snob

    August 29, 2015 at 7:20 pm

    • They stink.

      Soap

      August 29, 2015 at 10:22 pm

  20. I eat raw corn a lot.

    Lion of the Judas-sphere

    August 29, 2015 at 7:24 pm

    • Because they are double-faced, sneaky, lying, backstabbing, conniving, mean, deceitful bastards and these are not American traits. How do I know? Because when I came to America my American history teacher asked us to list ten American traits, I didn’t know the word ‘traits’ and instead gave the names of ten American Indian tribes, which I did know. We had a good laugh, but I remember that none of the above traits were American.

      Yakov

      August 29, 2015 at 9:22 pm

  21. You can roast it over the fire either holding it by the leaves or on a fork or a rod. This way you don’t loose the vitamins and it has a nice smokey taste. This is how I like it. If you are hungry, impatient or in a rush – eat it raw, but chew it well.

    Yakov

    August 29, 2015 at 9:14 pm

  22. How come nobody Googled it? I can understand that Lion is trolling, but what about everyone else?
    http://wonderopolis.org/wonder/why-are-they-called-ears-of-corn/

    Yakov

    August 29, 2015 at 9:53 pm

  23. Only on rare occasions does Lion make any contact with rural life.

    But when he does, he looks upon agrarian life with the awe and wonder of an abnormally sarcastic, inscrutable, space alien exploring a new planet. He even returns with botanical samples preserved for further research, and, possibly, consumption.

    The Undiscovered Jew

    August 29, 2015 at 10:09 pm

    • Very well stated TUJ.

      I know that many coastal city dwellers view rural America as ‘flyover country’ filled with
      low IQ bumpkins, but I am a little shocked that the gulf is so wide that there are
      urbanites who have never had fresh picked sweet corn.
      I assume this lack of experience also applies to fresh eggs, fresh picked tomatoes, fresh blueberries,
      and all the other delicious produce that’s grown throughout the American countryside.
      They must believe that what they buy in their grocery store is ‘fresh’.

      Are most city dwellers this removed from nature & rural life that they’ve never had fresh corn?
      I think if they ever went into a dairy barn, they would never drink milk again.
      Alternatively, their heads might explode.

      Interesting how separated city people are from country people.

      Anyway, an ear of corn has 14 grams of carbs and 2 grams of fiber. so, 12 net carbs.
      http://www.sparkpeople.com/calories-in.asp?food=ear+of+corn

      If you ate an ear in once in a while it probably wouldn’t screw up a low carb, ketogenic diet too badly.
      Still, they don’t call it sweet corn for nothing – Your body will rapidly convert it to sugar.
      Much corn is grown for animal feed and it is not nearly as tasty.

      List of sweet corn varieties:
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_sweetcorn_varieties

      Summer – Giuseppe Arcimboldo: Ear of corn.
      https://www.google.com/search?q=arcimboldo+summer&biw=1507&bih=763&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&sqi=2&ved=0CB0QsARqFQoTCOO2ucn00McCFcpXPgodJMwDuw#

      Nedd Ludd

      August 30, 2015 at 10:08 am

      • “Are most city dwellers this removed from nature & rural life that they’ve never had fresh corn?”

        There aren’t any corn fields in Manhattan, you know. Nor were there any in Arizona where I used to live, but I was able to buy oranges from the farmstands at the orange groves in Mesa, which were pretty good.

        There are “farmers markets” in Manhattan but they are very expensive, and the corn you would wind there is at least a day old, if not older.

        Lion of the Blogosphere

        August 30, 2015 at 10:15 am

      • Lion had a post about cows being dangerous. A mean, a pitbul is dangerous, but a cow? He is funny that way.

        Yakov

        August 30, 2015 at 10:36 am

      • I’m sure Manhattanites could grow corn if they wanted to. There are beekeepers in Manhattan, who keep their hives at rooftops, that produces honey for consumption. Would you consume honey made from urban bees, which scour for particles in a dirty place, such as Manhattan? Honey in Manhattan, no thanks!

        JS

        August 30, 2015 at 11:56 am

      • I personally wouldn’t eat any food grown in Manhattan. There’s a disgusting dirty black film that settles on my windowsill whenever I leave my window open.

        Lion of the Blogosphere

        August 30, 2015 at 12:26 pm

      • There’s a beekeeper in NYC, who sell his jars of honey, known as Andrew’s Honey, in the Union Sq Farmer’s Market. Some of his honey is harvested in a rooftop, by your neck of the woods, in Hell’s Kitchen. I’ve seen it, but I would never eat it.

        http://andrewshoney.com/coming-soon/

        JS

        August 30, 2015 at 12:41 pm

    • I know that many coastal city dwellers view rural America as ‘flyover country’ filled with
      low IQ bumpkins,

      Not necessarily. It’s often simply that they aren’t familiar with flyover country just as flyover country finds city slicker life baffling.

      but I am a little shocked that the gulf is so wide that there are
      urbanites who have never had fresh picked sweet corn.

      Or changed their tires, fixed a leaky faucet, or done any manual labor of any type.

      Lion had a post about cows being dangerous.

      Wait until he discovers Bison.

      There’s a disgusting dirty black film that settles on my windowsill whenever I leave my window open.

      You’ve walled yourself off from nature thoroughly. But it also means you’re completely at the mercy of the elements when civilization implodes.

      Does the Lion know how to grow arugula in an emergency?

      The Undiscovered Jew

      August 30, 2015 at 8:06 pm

    • I’ve seen it, but I would never eat it.

      But it will be advertised as ‘all natural’ and ‘organic’ so SWPLs will ingest those carcinogens happily.

      The Undiscovered Jew

      August 30, 2015 at 8:09 pm

  24. All vegetables taste better fresh than from a supermarket. I suppose some city people have no idea what fresh fruits and vegetables taste like. When I lived as a child on Guam we had a banana tree in our back yard which produced huge bunches of bananas all year round. The bananas you buy in the supermarket are OK but the fresh bananas from our tree were food of the gods.

    Jim

    August 30, 2015 at 12:32 pm

    • What about all these little gardens and vegetable patches all over the city? I saw white guys working there and black guys loafing around. Most of the time the places are locked. What’s this about? Who eats those veggies the niggers or the whitees? Or do the sell it at the market? I think that the whitees think that theses patches are going to make niggers more civilized. A strange notion, if true. I mean, they come from the jungle and there was plenty of these things there so how will these pathetic patches make a difference?

      Yakov

      August 30, 2015 at 5:01 pm

  25. Here in Guatemala they have these shops where ladies make corn tortillas all day, and they literally cost about one cent or 1.5 cents per tortilla, fresh off the grill. Talk about razor thin margins….

    And they make them from real corn freshly, and there’s no GMO corn in Guate either. They are pretty good. They don’t have much of a taste, but they are good with other things.

    shiva1008

    August 30, 2015 at 6:51 pm

    • Do they eat any exotic animals there?

      Yakov

      August 30, 2015 at 9:53 pm

    • Nice place to live?

      Curle

      August 30, 2015 at 11:57 pm

      • I doubt it. Mayn ruins are interesting, though. My freind married a Jewish girl from Guatemala and she is very nice. Knows how to behave and how to treat her husband right. No comparison to JAPs. Nice girl. Her father is an electrician and she knows electrical work. She used to work with us before she had a baby. A very nice girl. I think it’s hard to go wrong with a Guatemalan prole Jewish girl. JS and Lion, pay attention.

        Yakov

        August 31, 2015 at 10:22 pm


Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: