Lion of the Blogosphere

Lion was right about Andreas Lubitz!!!!

The final report has been released.

As you know, almost immediately after the crash, I said that Andreas Lubtiz had schizophrenia and had a psychotic episode while the flight.

A year later, the official report is mostly in agreement with me.

On 10 March 2015, the same physician diagnosed a possible psychosis and recommended psychiatric hospital treatment.

. . .

The BEA investigation concluded that the process for medical certification of pilots, in particular self-reporting in case of decrease in medical fitness between two periodic medical evaluations, did not succeed in preventing the co-pilot, who was experiencing mental disorder with psychotic symptoms, from exercising the privilege of his licence.

In particular an interview with the co-pilot’s relatives and his private physicians was impossible, as they exercised their right to refuse to be interviewed by the BEA and/or the BFU. However, the majority of the team of experts consulted by the BEA agreed that the limited medical information available may be consistent with the co-pilot having suffered from a psychotic depressive episode that started in December 2014, which lasted until the day of the accident. Other forms of mental ill-health cannot be excluded and a personality disorder is also a possibility.

They are calling it psychotic depression instead of schizophrenia, but I was close enough, they officially imply that he was experiencing a psychotic episode on the flight.

To all the obnoxious commenters who told me I don’t know crap about psychiatry, well a big F-YOU, I was right.

Unfortunately, we still don’t completely know everything there is to know about what Lubitz was suffering from because everyone refused to talk.

* * *

Here is a description of “psychosis”:

Psychosis is a serious mental disorder characterized by thinking and emotions that are so impaired, that they indicate that the person experiencing them has lost contact with reality.

People who are psychotic have false thoughts (delusions) and/or see or hear things that are not there (hallucinations). These are referred to as “positive” symptoms; “negative” symptoms like loss of motivation and social withdrawal can also occur.

These experiences can be frightening and may cause people who are suffering from psychosis to hurt themselves or others. It is important to see a doctor right away if you or someone you know is experiencing symptoms of psychosis.

Written by Lion of the Blogosphere

March 13, 2016 at 8:37 pm

Posted in News, Psychology

23 Responses

Subscribe to comments with RSS.

  1. “They are calling it psychotic depression instead of schizophrenia…” Same difference. The same symptoms could be described either way–this is not rocket science–so yes, you were right.

    Nicholas Stix

    March 13, 2016 at 8:52 pm

    • Schizophrenia is often described as a psychotic disorder that lasts longer than 6 months, and Lubitz first seemed to have severe psychiatric problems in 2008.

      Lion of the Blogosphere

      March 13, 2016 at 8:53 pm

  2. P.S. I have observed people who had been diagnosed as “paranoid-schizophrenic” having hallucinations. Psychosis and paranoid-schizophrenia are not mutually exclusive conditions.

    Nicholas Stix

    March 13, 2016 at 8:55 pm

    • Psychiatrist here. “Paranoid schizophrenia” (officially now just “schizophrenia” since they got rid of the subtypes of schizophrenia in DSM-V) is a psychotic disorder. Far from being mutually exclusive, psychosis is an integral part of schizophrenia. And hallucinations are one of the two core symptoms (the other being delusions) of which a person must experience at least one in order to meet the official diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia.

      Hermes

      March 13, 2016 at 10:29 pm

  3. “To all the obnoxious commenters who told me I don’t know crap about psychiatry, well a big F-YOU, I was right.”

    Lion channels Trump!

    Curle

    March 13, 2016 at 9:21 pm

    • “To all the obnoxious commenters who told me I don’t know crap about psychiatry, well a big F-YOU, I was right.”

      Yes, indeed. This F-You is very prole.
      An upper-class would write something smug and ironic, as only to show that the commenters are beneath him.
      No wonder Lion endorses Trump.

      Heinz Hommler

      March 14, 2016 at 1:41 pm

    • That “F-YOU” was very un-Lion like.

      CamelCaseRob

      March 16, 2016 at 3:11 am

  4. The BEA investigation concluded that the process for medical certification of pilots…did not succeed in preventing the co-pilot…from exercising the privilege of his licence.

    You don’t say!

    Jonathan Silber

    March 13, 2016 at 9:31 pm

  5. Good work.

    Sheila Tone

    March 14, 2016 at 1:47 am

  6. “To all the obnoxious commenters who told me I don’t know crap about psychiatry, well a big F-YOU, I was right.”

    I usually agree with your psychological diagnosis but not always. I did, however, agree with you on that one. Well done.

    destructure

    March 14, 2016 at 4:48 am

  7. *yawn*….big deal, you were right, so what do you want, a cookie? Given the number of predictions u throw out there, a few are bound to end up being right. What matters is your overall batting average, not the isolated instances where you turned out to be right. But the former is difficult to figure out since you tend to highlight your correct predictions far more often than your wrong predictions. I’d like to see more posts with the title: “Lion was dead wrong on….”. And in those posts you should apologize to all the naysayers who rightly thought your prediction would turn out to be wrong. Enough with your silly gloating every single time you’re right about something!!

    gailmargolis76

    March 14, 2016 at 7:09 am

  8. If I were a relative, I’d file a giant lawsuit against the airline that permitted him to fly when he was under psychiatric treatment.

    Tarl

    March 14, 2016 at 9:37 am

    • The point here is that the airline didn’t know.

      And in fact, they still don’t know much, there’s a wall of silence from his psychiatrists and his family. All they know is that a psychiatrist diagnosed him as having psychosis (delusions and/or hallucinations) serious enough to recommend hospitalization.

      However, a common problem with treating schizophrenics is that they often refuse to accept that they have a serious problem.

      Lion of the Blogosphere

      March 14, 2016 at 10:23 am

      • Then the psychiatrists become the target for the lawsuit!

        Tarl

        March 14, 2016 at 10:51 am

      • It’s often not possible to determine that a person is having delusions and/or hallucinations unless they self-report it. It appears that Lubitz was able to act normal enough in public so no one suspected he was actually going crazy.

        Lubitz’s doctors and psychiatrists appear to be immune from lawsuit under German patient-doctor confidentiality laws.

        Lion of the Blogosphere

        March 14, 2016 at 11:35 am

  9. Going to sound weird and perhaps untrustworthy, but I have an acquaintance who knew Andreas Lubitz as a teenager. They met in 2001 and stayed in contact. They had not spoken to each other for several years before germanwings though. He was sort of blown away by the whole story- he actually spoke highly of him- and recalled seeing news coverage and thinking “hey, that’s Andreas!”

    Lubitz was a confirmed marijuana smoker as a teenager though. Apparently he used to get high (no pun intended) and fly a Cessna aircraft around. Could and probably did contribute to his schizophrenia.

    colonel clink

    March 14, 2016 at 2:18 pm

  10. You are turning it upside down. People that commit suicide are considered mentally ill by this society. He had enough rational reasons to commit suicide without any need for mental illness. The distinction is important because if you go this road, you will end up labeling anyone that was dumped by a girlfriend mentally ill too.

    MyTwoCents

    March 14, 2016 at 2:54 pm

    • The official report says he had psychosis.

      Lion of the Blogosphere

      March 14, 2016 at 3:38 pm

    • A mentally normal person with “rational reasons” to commit suicide wouldn’t also murder 200 other people in the process.

      Richard

      March 14, 2016 at 3:57 pm

      • Why not? People facing the exit are thinking about the impressions they left in this world and if the world will remember them. It is perfectly rational to make a big splash. I guarantee that people will remember Lubitz more than an average Nobel Prize winner.

        MyTwoCents

        March 15, 2016 at 1:27 am

  11. “It is important to see a doctor right away if you or someone you know is experiencing symptoms of psychosis.” This is as important as it would be important to see a policemen if you think you committing the crime. Yep, good advice…

    MyTwoCents

    March 15, 2016 at 1:31 am

  12. You can be psychotic and depressed without being a schizophrenic so you aren’t necessarily correct.

    CamelCaseRob

    March 16, 2016 at 3:19 am


Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: