Lion of the Blogosphere

Trump and the politics of jobs

I will start by, again, pointing out that neither political party has publicly acknowledged the issue that technological advancements have reduced the economic need for human labor. No one is talking about how to handle the consequences of that. Both political parties are still firmly married to the idea that jobs are the necessary mechanism to allow people to earn the right to partake of the great abundance created by the modern technologically-advanced economy.

But neither party or major political philosophy has a rational means for creating jobs. Conservative Republicans believe that if only we lower taxes on the rich, the money will trickle down into jobs for everyone else. This denies the reality that when people in China make only a dollar an hour, and we now have the technological and legal means to replace jobs in the United States with jobs in China, to the extent that anything trickles down it will trickle down into the Chinese labor market instead of the U.S. labor market. (Although I’ve come to see the whole trickle-down theory as a mostly bogus way to justify policies that benefit super-rich Republican donors at the expense of everyone else.)

Liberal Democrats believe that if only everyone went to college and got a college degree, than all employment problems would be magically solved.

And then we have Trump, talking common sense. Change the legal landscape so that jobs can’t be as readily exported to China (such as with tariffs on Chinese goods and other policies that he has proposed), and reduce the number of immigrant non-citizens in the United States who are increasing the labor supply and thereby lowering salaries and demand for American citizens (very basic supply-and-demand Economics-101 stuff).

In the absence of creating a new economic system that provides meaning to people’s lives as well as money without the need to find a job in a laissez-faire economy, I agree with the Trump philosophy, it’s the only sensible way to create more, better, and higher-paying jobs for American citizens.

Written by Lion of the Blogosphere

May 7, 2016 at 1:52 pm

Posted in Economics, Politics

67 Responses

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  1. Liberal Democrats believe that if only everyone went to college and got a college degree, than all employment problems would be magically solved.

    Well at least the problem of how we can employee teachers and college administrators in the schooling industrial complex.

    The college systems are a business and Bernie Sanders wants to price support the products and services offered by having the government/taxpayers pay for all these democrat teachers and administrators.

    I agree with you about Trump’s agenda.

    Rifleman

    May 7, 2016 at 2:24 pm

    • Bernie Sanders is scum. I’m so happy Hillary stomped his guts and crushed his smarmy, SWPL supporters.

      Otis the Sweaty

      May 7, 2016 at 2:29 pm

      • Otis. Completely agree. I don’t want him dropping out so Hilary can beat him in NJ and CA. Bernie is a f $$!!@ loser.

        Wt

        May 7, 2016 at 4:09 pm

      • Bernie was campaigning in front of New York University, perhaps the most expensive institution, on par with the Ivy League’s non subsidized programs.

        He tells his supporters that college should be free, failing to take heed, that our large contingent of riff raff and NAMs is what makes the capitalists charge more for their positional goods and services, essentially avoiding these lowly organisms, who otherwise might disrupt your peace of mind.

        In reality, politicians could give an @ss about the college age demographic. They make up only a tiny %age of the electorate.

        JS

        May 7, 2016 at 4:58 pm

      • Bernie was campaigning in front of New York University, perhaps the most expensive institution, on par with the Ivy League’s non subsidized programs.

        He tells his supporters that college should be free, failing to take heed, that our large contingent of riff raff and NAMs is what makes the capitalists charge more for their positional goods and services, essentially avoiding these lowly organisms, who otherwise might disrupt your peace of mind.

        In reality, politicians could give an @ss about the college age demographic. They make up only a tiny %age of the electorate.

        It’s not unreasonable for the state to pay for some time of post-high school education or training. Countries Sanders admires in Europe do that. But there are a couple of differences between there and here:

        1) Only students with college aptitude go to college. Others get vocational or other training.

        2) College is sort of bare bones compared to here.

        Dave Pinsen

        May 9, 2016 at 11:20 pm

      • Capitalism in America makes a whole lot of sense, after analyzing the sheer amount of riff raff (many of whom are NAMs) that reside in the country. Pricing is to keep many of them away, reserve for the upper middle class and beyond.

        Now that Ivy Leagues have become less stringent, and admit many of UMCs based on skin color, the White demographic will abandon these institutions, and find other prestigious outlets to segregate themselves.

        America will not rise to great heights!

        JS

        May 10, 2016 at 10:30 am

    • The only upside of Trump’s nomination is that the Democrats are now secured of success in the GA they will be tempted to nominate Bernie, since that part is essentially socialist anyway restrained only by the necessity of being electable.

      With Trump as the only opposition that can be freed to follow their baser instincts and win anyway.

      The upside is that a Bernie nominee will help the GOP hold the House and the Senate. And Bernie will be an amusing POTUS not causing any actual damage in between his naps.

      Lion of the Turambar

      May 8, 2016 at 11:40 am

  2. The promoters of trade deals like NAFTA acknowledged that those deals would cause some Americans to lose jobs, either because their jobs were moved out of USA or because their companies were forced out of business by foreign competition. On the other hand, they claim that the trade deals would create new jobs by opening foreign markets to US products. The trade deals would also keep costs of manufactured goods lower, benefiting everyone that can afford to buy them.

    Most analysts claim that on the whole trade deals like NAFTA are a wash for jobs, but the jobs created by NAFTA are in different businesses, require different skills and are in different parts of the USA from the jobs that are lost. This does not help the workers that lose their job because of NAFTA. They cannot get one of those jobs created by NAFTA. All of the trade bills contained a small amount of money to help workers that lose their job because of the trade deal, but it is not enough money and it does not recognize the reality of the situation. If you are 50 have a home, family, mortgage, and kids in college, you cannot start over, be retrained for a whole new technical skill, sell your house and relocate to some other part of the country.

    Trump claims that the trade deals have been bad for the USA because the negotiators were weak. This is not true. The US negotiators were very good. They negotiated very good trade deals for big American companies. The problem was not the negotiators. The problem was the negotiators represented the interests of big American companies, not everyday working Americans.

    I think there is no question that the trade deals have been a big factor in keeping inflation very low. If the USA starts to erect trade barriers as Trump suggests to protect American jobs, the result will almost certainly be much higher inflation. It is also not at all clear that using tariffs to bring jobs back to the USA will work. Yes some jobs were come back, but other countries will retaliate by raising trade barriers to US made products so other Americans will lose their jobs. I suspect the result will be a wash in total jobs.

    mikeca

    May 7, 2016 at 2:39 pm

    • Everything you said was 100% true. But like the Dilbert guy says, Trump supporters aren’t going off of facts.

      Trumps says China is stealing our jobs and it fits in with American anxiety about being eclipsed by another superpower. So the public eats it up.

      Raising tariff on China would hurt the poor and middle class the most, meanwhile the rich can import expensive Euro goods.

      As the other poster said, the problem with the trade deals is that they benefit big biz and screw smaller businesses

      Anonymous

      May 7, 2016 at 5:57 pm

      • > Raising tariff on China would hurt the poor and middle class the most

        Anonymous dipshit non-native English speaker detected. What gives you the right to meddle in our affairs?

        shiva1008

        May 7, 2016 at 8:48 pm

      • No, it would not hurt the poor.It’s easy to see why this is not the case: do you think that you are actually getting a discount on the prices you pay for goods?

        Think of it this way. If a company could raise prices by the amount of a tariff, don’t you think they would have done so already? Wouldn’t any profit maximizing firm already by optimizing what they could charge while not affecting revenues? So, why would a 45% tariff suddenly lead to some 45% increase in prices? Do you think you’re getting a 45% discount now?

        map

        May 9, 2016 at 1:51 am

    • In my opinion, the trade deficit isn’t just a matter of jobs and displaced workers. When it reaches the levels it currently has then It’s a national security issue.

      Since you’re interested in this topic, I highly recommend Warren Buffett’s article titled:
      America’s Growing Trade Deficit Is Selling The Nation Out From Under Us. Here’s A Way To Fix The Problem–And We Need To Do It Now.

      http://www.berkshirehathaway.com/letters/growing.pdf

      destructure

      May 7, 2016 at 6:17 pm

    • Trump is not proposing a trade war; tariff threats are a last resort but also and more importantly an initial position on renegociating trade deals.

      vdorta

      May 8, 2016 at 12:01 pm

    • China exports a product to America, is charged 7% import duty. America exports to China, is charged 40% import duty. This is called Free Trade. America increases import duty to 20%, is raising a trade barrier.

      See also, diversity is our strength.

      Ulick McGee

      May 8, 2016 at 1:26 pm

    • Free trade is ultimately a political decision. It was sold to the public as a way to not only increase jobs for the American public but to even alter the quality of jobs provided. A variant of David Ricardo’s theories were used: all the low-end scut work would go to China and Mexico and Americans would focus on the value-added stuff.

      It did not work out that way.

      Therefore, free trade as sold to the public was built on a fraud. It has, in practice, become nothing but a shell game…just a way of shifting costs around. Did some people make a lot of money doing this? Sure. It came at a huge social cost.

      It is now time to reverse this.

      map

      May 9, 2016 at 1:45 am

    • False.

      Since NAFTA, the USA isn’t experiencing a shift in its economy from one sector to another sector. The USA is mostly just losing jobs.

      NAFTA is allowing the U.S. to buy cheap Mexican goods, but in returns or these goods Mexico is not buying US goods. Mexico is instead taking US treasuries, allowing Mexico to buy up swaths of California and Texas.

      So the USA producers really aren’t benefitting from NAFTA.

      Then there are all of the immigration effects produced by NAFTA, and the U.S. Isn’t benefitting from them either.

      Rotten

      May 9, 2016 at 11:25 am

  3. The irony is that even if you change US policy, it doesn’t solve the existing low IQ problem, and the solutions tend to challenge our notion of a free society or our moral and religious values.

    David Alexander

    May 7, 2016 at 2:54 pm

    • Is this David Alexander aka Beta Railfan? I thought you might’ve killed yourself or something.

      Welcome Back!

      ruhkukah

      May 7, 2016 at 3:54 pm

      • Wow… just re-read my comment, and it sounds very nasty/negative. I guess because I always felt David was a troll, but actually not sure.

        If you can delete the comment above Lion, please do so.

        ruhkukah

        May 8, 2016 at 1:55 am

    • I was wondering a couple of weeks back if David was still around from the old days. I hope the kid made out out ok

      Lion of the Turambar

      May 8, 2016 at 8:39 am

  4. In the future if things continue as they are now this will be the reality of the job market:

    90% of people will work in low-wage jobs, insecure part-time jobs or “gig” jobs. 9.9+% will be rich people who are able to get value transference jobs through connections and nepotism. Then, there will be a small number of important value-creating jobs for people with IQs in the 1 in 1,000 range.

    chairman

    May 7, 2016 at 3:34 pm

    • “Then, there will be a small number of important value-creating jobs for people with IQs in the 1 in 1,000 range.”

      Which won’t pay as much as the best value-transference jobs.

  5. This certainly isn’t the first time that new technology threatened jobs. There is always a new paradigm of employment that replaces the old. In this case, we will still need millions of people to manufacture, program and maintain the machines that automate labor. I don’t think it’s as bad as you think it is.

    B.T.D.T.

    May 7, 2016 at 4:39 pm

    • “manufacture, program and maintain the machines that automate labor” — these processes can and will be automated.

      Tarl

      May 7, 2016 at 5:30 pm

    • I kinda agree with Tarl on this one. Just because new jobs showed up in the past doesn’t mean it will happen in the future.

      Besides, what happens if the new jobs are too intellectually demanding to be done by people of below-average intelligence?

      sabril

      May 7, 2016 at 7:06 pm

      • There are still many functions of industry that will require the human experience. You still need good salespeople to promote your business. You still need smiling faces to greet customers at hotels and restaurants. And society will still require human beings to interpret and resolve human problems ie human resources, psychology, teaching, etc. I really don’t think that regular people would find a world full of vacuous robots to be very emotionally satisfying.

        B.T.D.T.

        May 7, 2016 at 8:56 pm

      • The jobs must be automated “just enough” so that stupid NAMs can do them. Like the cash registers at McDonalds that have pictures of the food instead of numbers to type in, and that automatically make change.

        Tarl

        May 7, 2016 at 10:04 pm

      • Tarl and sabril are right. But we still have to automate in order to compete with other countries with lower wages and automation. Also, it’s better for a plant to automate and lay off 2/3 of it’s workers than to outsource or go out of business and lay off all it’s workers.

        destructure

        May 7, 2016 at 10:07 pm

      • >You still need smiling faces to greet customers at hotels and restaurants.

        Not interacting with people is one of the great benefits of self-checkout at all kinds of stores. Won’t it be nice to be able to roll up to a hotel and you’ve made your reservation beforehand, and all you do is punch a code into the keypad and it dispenses your room keys? No more waiting around in hotel lobbies.
        Or go to a restaurant and just order off of a tablet that has the entire menu with pictures and descriptions for you. The only thing needed at that point is a busboy. Bad for women with no skills, good for society.

        >And society will still require human beings to interpret and resolve human problems ie human resources, psychology, teaching, etc. I really don’t think that regular people would find a world full of vacuous robots to be very emotionally satisfying.”

        HR as a whole is a CYA department for big companies. The world would be a better place to completely eliminate those positions. No one thinks all human labor can be automated in the near future, but the kind of support roles you call out will naturally become less prevalent as human labor in general loses value.

        Panther of the Blogocube

        May 8, 2016 at 7:01 am

  6. Real artificial intelligence is a pipe dream. I think this reality will put a hard limit on the amount of automation that can take place.

    Andrew E.

    May 7, 2016 at 6:24 pm

    • I agree. To create true AI, we would first have to understand human consciousness itself which is basically unknown and unknowable.

      Sagi Is My Guru

      May 7, 2016 at 10:02 pm

      • That’s a fancy way of saying you hold yourself in high esteem. But you are wrong to do so, because your brain is not irreducibly complicated. It’s just a bigger version of the same thing that is in rats and dogs.

        Thinking big thoughts is what big brains do. It doesn’t doesn’t make them impossible to understand. The human kidneys were also once a complete mystery.

        Lowe

        May 8, 2016 at 8:34 pm

      • Yes, but the brain as a piece of hardware is not the same thing as human consciousness and the ability to think creatively. That’s the whole point. Why do we dream? Why do we forget? Why do we imagine things that aren’t real? Science doesn’t have answers to these questions and they are arguably largely unanswerable. Our brains aren’t rational machines, which is why AI is a practical impossibility.

        Sagi Is My Guru

        May 8, 2016 at 9:15 pm

      • “Science doesn’t have answers to these questions and they are arguably largely unanswerable. ”

        The scientific answer is that these brain attributes created a survival advantage for our ancestors.

      • The scientific answer is that these brain attributes created a survival advantage for our ancestors.

        Just so!!

        Of course, this mechanism has never been observed anywhere, ever. So there’s that.

        Andrew E.

        May 9, 2016 at 12:31 am

  7. I agree. At any given moment, there are a certain number of jobs in the US. Decreasing the number of workers will increase wages, as employers compete for a smaller labor pool. This may help to mitigate the effects of the job-killing $15/hr minimum wage. It will also spur automation. The US needs skilled, high IQ immigrants, not more tomato pickers who enter the country illegally. The big corporations support more immigration because they want to keep labor costs low (H1-B’s are a big help here and really screw American STEM graduates).

    Black Death

    May 7, 2016 at 7:50 pm

    • “The US needs skilled, high IQ immigrants…”

      Are you suggesting that there is a shortage of these folks? Have you been to an American hospital and looked at the doctors lately? The US does not *need* immigrants of any kind for any reason right now.

      SQ

      May 7, 2016 at 9:07 pm

    • Also open borders = more consumers and higher property values. People forget about that part.

      Otis the Sweaty

      May 7, 2016 at 10:17 pm

      • “More consumers” = mestizos with EBT cards. Yay. Doesn’t do me any good personally. Are they spending more on consumer goods than they’re taking out of the economy?

        “Higher property values” makes affordable family formation more difficult. Also, it is easy credit driving up home prices, and you don’t need open borders for that. Last but not least, open borders drives down property values as people are desperate to move away from neighborhoods recently colonized by La Raza (not least because the presence of mestizo children makes a school district undesirable and thus kills the value of homes within its boundaries).

        Tarl

        May 7, 2016 at 11:27 pm

      • More consumers and higher property values are bad for us peasants, but they are good for the crony capitalists.

        Otis the Sweaty

        May 8, 2016 at 11:49 am

  8. You don’t get, do you? People who can work and don’t, have no right to eat. This is a very healthy principal. Forced labor and flogging for the bums and if they still refuse to work let them starve to death. Nothing else ever made sense. I saw this in practice (without flogging and srarving) in the USSR and it was beautiful. But it won’t work with American demographic without that extra incentive of flogging and starving.

    Yakov

    May 7, 2016 at 9:38 pm

    • The flogging and starving took place out of sight – in labor camps where they sent social parasites.

      Tarl

      May 7, 2016 at 11:28 pm

  9. ‘In the absence of creating a new economic system that provides meaning to people’s lives as well as money without the need to find a job in a laissez-faire economy’.

    What are you talking about now? Economic system that provides meaning to peoples’ lives? Like what? Lion, what economic system will do this for you?

    Yakov

    May 8, 2016 at 1:23 am

  10. The FT had a whole series about the rise of robots last week, capped off with an editorial in Saturday’s paper. You ought to check it out.

    Dave Pinsen

    May 8, 2016 at 3:34 am

  11. Lion,

    You have some really smart commenters (such as Market Reader? I forget his name) who might be able to explain how it is that Japan and Germany remain major industrial powers while paying their workers quite good wages. I’m not convinced that the reason the US workers are in such hot water is because they are asking for too much money. I think it’s because Big Business in the Anglosphere preaches the gospel of Free Trade, while practicing old fashioned globalist rapacity (nothing new about it) while Big Business in Germany/Japan is constrained by laws. This has been going on since the 18th century, and reached a zenith in the 19th, with the Robber Barons. Please everyone read up about labor conditions then. If it weren’t for the labor movement and laws, they would still be working people to death in the dark satanic mills.

    @destructure: ” But we still have to automate in order to compete with other countries with lower wages and automation.” Germany & Japan automate too. But they automate intellligently and on behalf of their workers. Japan has had low birthrates for generations and they will stay Japanese and prosperous. Germany is on the road to ruin due to invasion, but that’s another issue. In terms of their industrial process and output, they are a major power. So what’s the difference between Us and Them? Laws.

    gothamette

    May 8, 2016 at 8:53 am

    • The US is an industrial powerhouse. It is the world’s number 1 manufacturer. I don’t buy that free trade is holding the US back.

      Otis the Sweaty

      May 8, 2016 at 10:53 am

      • Quality, not quantity. America produces inferior and often tasteless goods, for its prole majority. No one thinks highly of American luxury brands.

        JS

        May 8, 2016 at 6:45 pm

    • Japan isnt a good example. Their GDP is slightly lower than it was in 1995 while our GDP is 3x higher.

      Germany has benefited from
      a. a lot of energy and esprit from reunification
      b. being in a free trade zone where they are the only manufacturer with their act together

      Lion of the Turambar

      May 8, 2016 at 11:35 am

      • I didn’t say that the US is a third world country. I asked how it is that German & Japan manage sophisticated economies while having a very highly paid work force.

        gothamette

        May 8, 2016 at 6:00 pm

      • I asked how it is that German & Japan manage sophisticated economies while having a very highly paid work force.

        I’m not as up to date with Japan as I am with Europe but I can tell you Germany’s nominal per capita GDP is less than that of white Americans. Additionally Germans and Western Europeans generally have to put up with a significantly higher cost of living – you do know the reason wealthy Parisians, Londoners, and Berliners shop in New York City whenever they have the opportunity is because NY merchandise is cheaper than the same goods are at home?

        The Undiscovered Jew

        May 8, 2016 at 7:58 pm

      • “Additionally Germans and Western Europeans generally have to put up with a significantly higher cost of living – ”

        I don’t doubt that, but how does this all fit in with Lion’s concerns about the US competing with cheap labor China?

        Japan does it, Germany does it – how?

        Regarding the Japanese and their way of life, Eamonn Fingleton of Forbes lives there, and he casts doubt on how awful the Japanese have it. He thinks it’s a ruse they maintain, oh poor me. Life there is excellent. The Japanese are awash in luxury cars, the best clothing, etc. And look at their results – are they dying like flies, the way the white working class is?

        ” you do know the reason wealthy Parisians, Londoners, and Berliners shop in New York City whenever they have the opportunity is because NY merchandise is cheaper than the same goods are at home?”

        Wow, so wealthy Berliners come to the US to stock up – this proves Lion’s point about cheap labor economies how? You are saying that Germany has a lot of rich people. I agree.

        gothamette

        May 8, 2016 at 8:37 pm

      • Next time I’m going to a 3rd world country to stock up on Gucci bags, because the standard of living is lower, and thus the prices are cheaper. Germans via NYC shopping for goods.

        JS

        May 9, 2016 at 9:53 am

      • I don’t doubt that, but how does this all fit in with Lion’s concerns about the US competing with cheap labor China?

        Japan does it, Germany does it – how?

        My point is Germany isn’t as competitive as they look if you consider Germans earn less per capita than white Americans (for now…) and have higher expenses.

        Of course this doesn’t mean there isn’t room to improve American manufacturing competitiveness.

        The Undiscovered Jew

        May 9, 2016 at 8:44 pm

    • Yes. Laws.

      Their laws say they must generate a trade surplus.

      Our laws say we need to generate a trade deficit.

      map

      May 9, 2016 at 1:54 am

  12. America is the best when it comes to financial opportunity! Whoever says different is stupid. Two of my workers didn’t show up, I’m billing their time and doing the work myself. It’s a little tough on my own, but for this amount of money I can rough it out. Truly amazing country! All I’m doing is running copper pipes and electrical cables. Why can’t almost anyone do it? Because they are lazy and spoiled and stupid, yes stupid. They want to get paid first and then they’ll do a good job. Wrong! You do an excellent job regardless of the pay and the money will come. Maybe not in Zimbabwe, but in NYC for sure. The truth is – I wasn’t sure if I would be able to do it alone, but I tried and I made it. And it’s absolutly perfect – obre de arte! I mean it. I’m tired, but I’m going back to run more pipes and cables.

    Yakov

    May 8, 2016 at 6:19 pm

    • America doesn’t value value creating personnel. A construction worker only gets to marvel at the building, he helped built. Yet, he doesn’t get to live in it. Only cubicle workers sitting at the computer engaging in value transference, making millions of fake numbers, has that privilege.

      Tell it to enough people, and they wise up. America’s elites want to screw you, then throw you at the curb, while they live the good life.

      JS

      May 8, 2016 at 6:50 pm

      • Mate, I know that America respects work. I feel respected. America is great. You are making up nonsense. You have an evil eye. Repent before it’s too late.

        Yakov

        May 8, 2016 at 9:31 pm

      • Yes, hence America’s constant stream of 3rd world immigrants and anyone who is gullible to serve the needs of the elites on the cheap. They cannot exploit the native White majority as much as they used to, who have been replaced by non-Whites, and freshly arrived individuals like yourself.

        JS

        May 9, 2016 at 9:57 am

      • @JS

        Remember a sime rule in life: complainers complain and producers produce.

        Also, don’t mix apples and oranges. Immigration has nothing to do with Americans respecting labor. It impressed me 40 years ago and it amazed my Tajik today. Stop barking.

        Yakov

        May 9, 2016 at 3:10 pm

      • Here is a testament of your low standards:

        40 years ago, NYC’s public institutions were par excellent with the best. Today, no one with a right mind, thinks highly of them.

        JS

        May 9, 2016 at 4:47 pm

    • “America is the best when it comes to financial opportunity!”

      America has the least upward social mobility of any advanced country, though the UK might have overtaken us in this respect recently.

      chairman

      May 8, 2016 at 8:40 pm

      • I don’t know what social mobility means. I don’t want to go anywhere socially. I freely associate with diverse people from NAMs to millionairs. I don’t feel too inferior or too superior to anyone. I have my place under the sun and they have their’s. I can admire a gem without having a need to pocess it. Work is it’s own reward for me. I don’t want to be anyone else. So I dunno. I have no problems like that. You should just be who you are. I mean, what you wanna be already? In America everybody is equal, so you can’t be anything.

        This is such a weird comment, almost every sentence has ‘I’ in it. I sound like Trump. This is bad. But you know what I mean.

        Yakov

        May 8, 2016 at 9:40 pm

      • The Anglo-Prole-Sphere is a still an empire to the ruling classes. It is in their best interest to not promote many individuals. No bottom line based company, wants to dole out more money and promote people. It’s common sense.

        JS

        May 9, 2016 at 10:00 am

  13. I don’t buy any of this robotics and automation stuff. The technologies are plagued by poor system design combined with cheap credit. It’s mostly hype. Generalized automation is very expensive and hard to pull off.

    That is why we have mass immigration. The elites are using technology to hedge against labor and labor to hedge against technology.

    map

    May 9, 2016 at 1:57 am

  14. Azealia Banks and Jon Voight have just endorsed Trump.

    gothamette

    May 9, 2016 at 11:06 am


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