Lion of the Blogosphere

Republicans pull Obamacare bill

I say this is good news for Trump in the medium and long run. Repeal of Obamacare would have been a huge PR mess.

Trump should use this opportunity to make Paul Ryan look like a weak leader, and wrest control of the Republican Party agenda from the establishment.

Let’s get to work on ending illegal immigration, ending H-1Bs, curtailing other work visas, significantly reducing the number of new green cards granted.

* * *

And now I’m going to go back to playing Overwatch. My Rank was briefly over 1100, let’s see if I can get it back there.

Written by Lion of the Blogosphere

March 24, 2017 at 3:51 pm

Posted in Politics

62 Responses

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  1. Let’s get to work on ending illegal immigration, ending H-1Bs, curtailing other work visas, significantly reducing the number of new green cards granted.

    Yes.

    Andrew E.

    March 24, 2017 at 4:32 pm

  2. Do you play chess at all, Lion?

    Otis the Sweaty

    March 24, 2017 at 4:40 pm

    • I played chess when I was in high school. I tried to get into it in 2007-2008 but wasn’t very good.

      Lion of the Blogosphere

      March 24, 2017 at 5:35 pm

  3. Lion, what is your gamertag on overwatch?

    jjbees

    March 24, 2017 at 5:25 pm

  4. The bill pretty much went down the way I predicted it would a week ago.

    Paul Ryan, Oblivious Idiot

    https://pragmaticallydistributed.wordpress.com/2017/03/16/obamacare-repeal/

    Ryan is the perfect symbol of the establishment Republican because he always has to make matters unnecessarily difficult for everyone.

    Everything would go so much easier for every member of the GOP hierarchy, from the most indifferent Republican voter up to the most plugged in donor, if the establishment would simply cooperate occasionally with Conservatives.

    And yet they always take the hard route by insisting on fighting their rightwing with many times more tenacity than they do, if they do, against Democrats. We see this wrongheaded mindset of theirs emerge again in the repeal process.

    For his sake only, Ryan has a compelling enough self-interest in appeasing Conservatives to get something respectable passed: If Ryan fails he isn’t nearly feared enough by his Caucus compared to how, for example, they once feared Tom Delay to survive a setback on repeal. But Ryan continues on, smiling obliviously like the idiot he is, jeopardizing his legislation by refusing to compromise with Conservatives.

    Perhaps Trump wants him to lose a few of the initial House votes to discredit Ryan and prepare the way for a different Speaker. If this is the goal desired by Trump there is no more certain way to reach it than by handing the initiative to Paul Ryan.

    I give the House Leadership’s repeal bill a C- on policy and a D- on strategy.

    Its reform of Medicaid is its best feature. The bill’s expansion of Health Saving Accounts is, if not flawless, acceptable. The tax credits are undesirable but not a deal killer.

    The bill’s glaring fault is its failure to repeal Obamacare’s regulations. Without elimination of those regulations the other aspects of the bill will not have a free enough insurance market to be successful in. Dealing with regulations is absent because the House “leadership” stupidly assumed from the start they could not get then past procedural objections to their inclusion from the Senate Parliamentarian.

    First, it is not clear the Parliamentarian would strike down all of the regulation reforms if it were explained that the regulations are germane to reconciliation rules because the House bill repeals Obamacare’s taxes and its regulations were designed so they could not function without those taxes. There is a decent chance the Parliamentarian could be brought around to this thinking. But we will not likely find out if the House doesn’t try.

    Secondly, if the Parliamentarian does rule (wrongly) against their relevance the Parliamentarian can simply be overruled by Vice President Pence or Majority Leader McConnell.

    Any repeal bill the House sends to the Senate should include as much regulatory rollback (including permitting selling medical insurance across state lines) as possible in order to increase the odds that at least some of the those rollbacks survive the Senate.

    On the flipside, the fewer regulations are repealed in this first attempt at dismantling Obamacare the less likely it is they will be repealed in future votes when the vote hurdle in the Senate rises to 60.

    House and Senate Conservatives could best position Ryan to be blamed by Trump for any vote failures by doing a runaround Ryan through directly offering Trump a set of specific amendments to the bill that, if Trump approves, would then guarantee their support for the full House legislation.

    If Ryan includes their proposals they will be in a strong position to ultimately repeal more than 75% of Obamacare instead of the current bill which, arguably, repeals only ~30% of it.

    If Ryan does not Trump will be able to ask why Ryan preferred the legislation fail instead of seeking a compromise Trump approved of.

    The Undiscovered Jew

    March 24, 2017 at 6:16 pm

    • If Ryan fails he isn’t nearly feared enough by his Caucus compared to how,

      All you said was that the repeal is facing trouble, which everyone knew a week ago. Where do you predict failure?

      And your advice, which basically consisted of replacing obamacare with something that only has any record of actually working in libertardian fantasies, would just court conservative votes at the expense of liberals and moderates. Something that would make the real challenge, threading the 60 senate votes needle, even more difficult than the existing plan did.

      Magnavox

      March 24, 2017 at 8:15 pm

    • I was reading the explanation of the bill over at Conservative Treehouse, especially the reconciliation vs. the repeal hurdle of 60 Senate votes.

      For the life of me, I don’t understand why the House has Senate voting under consideration. Who cares what the Senate does? Craft the bill, craft the vision of what you want health care to be, an then let the Senate hang themselves striking out what they don’t like. There are primaries coming up…people have to be on record where they stand.

      map

      March 24, 2017 at 8:17 pm

    • “Everything would go so much easier for every member of the GOP hierarchy, from the most indifferent Republican voter up to the most plugged in donor, if the establishment would simply cooperate occasionally with Conservatives.”

      In my view, the Republicans lost this battle when they changed their message from “repeal” to “repeal and replace”. If Romney had won in 2012, Republicans could have quickly repealed Obamacare before it came into full effect, and they wouldn’t have needed to replace it with anything. Once Obamacare went into effect and lots of people got insurance under it, it became impossible to just repeal it. The Republican message changed to “repeal and replace.” The replacement was going to be terrific. No one would lose coverage. Insurance would be cheaper, have lower deductibles and you would have better access to health care.

      There never was a Republican plan that could do what the candidates promised. Any Republican plan that could pass was going to causing tens of millions of people to lose health insurance.

      The conservatives want to get the Federal Government totally out of health care. Completely repeal Obamacare and gut Medicaid now to start the process of phasing out of Medicaid. They also want to start the process of phasing out Medicare, but probably not this year. The problem with that goal is by using the “repeal and replace” language in the campaign, Republicans already conceded that the Federal Government should have a role in health care. They accepted the Democratic argument that every other rich industrialized country in the world has universal health care system of some type, and that the USA should too. They were just quibbling with the Democrats about what that system should look like.

      The conservatives are totally out of step with Trump and the parties messaging on health care. Trump instinctively knew he could not run on the message of we are want to repeal Obamacare and start the phase out of Medicaid and Medicare. The Republican conservatives are just badly out of step with their base. Obamacare was very unpopular with Republicans as long as Obama was in office. Now that he is out of office things are different.

      The leadership tried to accommodate the conservatives, but the more they changed the bill to suite conservatives, the more moderate Republicans they lost. The conservatives come from very safe deep red districts and don’t have to worry much about losing their seats (although if they screw with Medicare that might not be true), but not all Republicans do. In the Senate the Republicans have to run state wide and cannot go too far to the right.

      The Republican party has been an opposition party for the last 10 years. Now they have to figure out how to be a governing party. Governing requires compromises to get the votes to pass legislation. When Obama was president it was easy for moderate Republicans to vote to repeal Obamacare, because they knew Obama would veto the bill. Now Republicans have a president that will sign bills, they need to grow up and start thinking about the policy implications of the ideologically driven legislation they are trying to pass.

      mikeca

      March 24, 2017 at 9:22 pm

      • Any Republican plan that could pass was going to causing tens of millions of people to lose health insurance.

        No one would “lose” anything. They’d no longer be allowed to steal from others.

        destructure

        March 25, 2017 at 12:01 am

      • Like the way children steal money for education, or indigent criminal defendants “steal” because some pointy headed liberal decided they’re “entitled” to a professional defense.

        Vince

        March 25, 2017 at 3:27 am

      • That this was an attempt to phase out Medicaid is a Democratic talking point. Bloc granting Medicaid is an absolute necessity in dealing with our entitlement crisis. I don’t understand the objection policy wise. I assume the real objection has to be political.

        Mike Street Station

        March 25, 2017 at 7:18 am

      • No one would “lose” anything. They’d no longer be allowed to steal from others.

        It’s the system itself that is stealing money, trillions of dollars every year more than what other countries spend for superior results.

        There are all sorts of reforms needed for means tested social programs, mandatory birth control and vastly increased levels of segregation being the two biggies, but taking away their health care is an insane one.

        American conservatives are so stupid.

        Magnavox

        March 25, 2017 at 9:07 am

      • For the life of me, I don’t understand why the House has Senate voting under consideration. Who cares what the Senate does?

        The excuse was the Senate Parliamentarian could strip items such as regulation reforms from the House bill on grounds they are not relevant to the budget.

        Of course Obamacare was designed to be so integrated that removing one part would cause the whole program to fail. Therefore repeal of regulations are relevant to a repeal done through reconciliation since, at a minimum, the taxes that fund the program would have been gutted.

        The Parliamentarian was just a feeble excuse for Ryan to not do his job.

        Once Obamacare went into effect and lots of people got insurance under it, it became impossible to just repeal it.

        There will eventually be no one on Obamacare because no one will be able to afford the exchanges rapidly inflating premiums.

        The Undiscovered Jew

        March 25, 2017 at 10:31 am

      • Vince — Nice straw man. I particularly liked how you tried to work children into it.

        destructure

        March 25, 2017 at 12:18 pm

      • It’s the system itself that is stealing money, trillions of dollars every year more than what other countries spend for superior results.

        And you want to make it worse.

        There are all sorts of reforms needed for means tested social programs, mandatory birth control and vastly increased levels of segregation being the two biggies,

        I agree with that.

        but taking away their health care is an insane one.

        You misunderstand who it is that’s taking something. Those receiving healthcare they didn’t pay for are the takers.

        American conservatives are so stupid.

        Apparently you define stupid as anyone who doesn’t support your socialist agenda.

        destructure

        March 25, 2017 at 12:43 pm

      • So many conservatives are like the robots on Westworld who just can’t register anything relating to them being robots. For American conservative it’s the same thing but they can never acknowledge how much cheaper and better other countries medical systems are. You can put the evidence right in front of their face but it just doesn’t make any impact

        Magnavox

        March 25, 2017 at 9:52 pm

    • “Its reform of Medicaid is its best feature. The bill’s expansion of Health Saving Accounts is, if not flawless, acceptable. The tax credits are undesirable but not a deal killer.”

      I would agree that the Medicaid reform was the best feature, and maybe it was worth passing just for that feature, but everything else in the bill would probably have done for Republicans what Obamacare did for Democrats; reduce the party to a few shrill extremists.

      On the tax credit side, I’m curious on what the complaint is. I don’t like how low the tax credits are nor do I like how they are scaled by age rather than income, but I’m for tax credits. What was shocking about this healthcare debate was how many Freedom Caucus members opposed any tax credits. It’s like they had never heard them before and are equating them to a new entitlement program. Every Republican reform plan going back to 2008 has had tax credits as THE central feature. Without them, millions lose insurance because of affordability and the Republican Party is done.

      Mike Street Station

      March 25, 2017 at 7:14 am

      • but everything else in the bill would probably have done for Republicans what Obamacare did for Democrats; reduce the party to a few shrill extremists.

        The bill didn’t go far enough repealing Obamacare. If the regulations were left in place there would not be enough market competition to drive down insurance premiums.

        The initial objections to tax credits were they created a new entitlement program. I agree the credits were not a bad idea if they were means tested, but the Freedom Caucus was primarily opposed to leaving the insurance regulations in place. If the regulations had been repealed they most likely could have comprised on tax credits.

        The Undiscovered Jew

        March 25, 2017 at 10:36 am

  5. Lion, I am an attorney in Florida. My wife is my legal assistant. I own the firm. My AGI is consistently above $200K. Obamacare for people in my position– small business owners — is horrendous.

    I am by no means rich, and for our family of 3 we pay $1500 a month in premiums for a plan with a per person deductible of $4k. Just the premiums for the year cost us the price of a modest new car… and they go up every year.

    My wife and don’t smoke and are in our 30s. The is only one insurer in the state who has a PPO Plan. So it’s take it or leave it. Before Obama, my insurance for comparable coverage was $200 per month.

    No one seems to care. Democrats think people like me are rich, and most Republicans have regular jobs and receive employer -subsidized coverage.

    Bell2

    March 24, 2017 at 6:21 pm

    • So why don’t you agitate for a single payer esque system or a Swiss style system?

      Simba of the blogosphere

      March 24, 2017 at 7:44 pm

      • What are you some kind of fag? He a real murican who knows that the real problem is giving poor people health care and not the trillions of dollars wasted every year on such an inefficient system.

        Magnavox

        March 24, 2017 at 8:17 pm

      • America is a prole nation, because there is no incentive for progress, just more wealth transfer. Proles don’t care about progress, only money and living for the moment. There is no incentive for anyone to improve one’s standing in America.

        JS

        March 24, 2017 at 9:55 pm

      • There is no incentive for anyone to improve one’s standing in America.

        Everyone is obsessed with increasing their standing they’re just idiots who get manipulated into doing it in really stupid ways. You should see all the stupid working conservatives bragging about how they bankrupt themselves with medical expenses rather accept government aid or push for a cheaper medical system. Because they would rather look down on poor people getting subsidized health care than criticize the health care system itself for manipulating the government into giving them favorable regulation that amounts to multi trillion dollar yearly subsidies.

        Magnavox

        March 25, 2017 at 9:16 am

      • He a real murican who knows that the real problem is giving poor people health care and not the trillions of dollars wasted every year on such an inefficient system.

        His problem, you retard cocksuscker, is that he’s paying $1500 a month for insurance that before Obamacare cost him only $200 a month.

        The Undiscovered Jew

        March 25, 2017 at 10:45 am

  6. “Let’s get to work on ending illegal immigration, ending H-1Bs, curtailing other work visas, significantly reducing the number of new green cards granted.”

    Um….shouldn’t he have been doing that all along? Why this diversion into such a mess?

    gothamette

    March 24, 2017 at 6:21 pm

    • Because tax reform is the number one objective of 95% of r’s. Doing “something” on ACA allows for a bigger position to be staked out on tax reform.

      Simba of the blogosphere

      March 24, 2017 at 7:47 pm

      • This is hopelessly twisted reasoning. This was a Democrat win. A Republican loss. Trump has lost political capital here, bigtime.

        gothamette

        March 24, 2017 at 8:28 pm

      • @Gothamette – it isn’t my reasoning. It is the reasoning of R’s.You are mistaken totally if immigration is the number one concern of R’s. Even health care really isn’t. The golden ring is tax reform.

        Simba of the Blogosphere

        March 24, 2017 at 9:06 pm

      • @Simba,

        I wasn’t responding to you – I used the wordpress feature to respond, and the system responded to you. I was responding to someone else on this long comment line who was defending Trump getting involved in this mess. I can’t even find the comment I was responding to, LOL.

        I agree with you, by the way, about Republican priorities. And I think they are delusional. I think they would repeal ALL taxes if they could.

        gothamette

        March 25, 2017 at 11:31 am

  7. I was hoping they would vote and fail. That way Trump would be off the hook for his repeal/replace campaign promise. Plus, he wouldn’t be blamed for repealing it but the TruCons would be blame for being stuck with it. And, like you point out, Trump should use the opportunity to strengthen his position relative to Ryan. Of course, he could have done that either way. But if it had passed then Trump could have still claimed the victory.

    If Trump isn’t a Machiavellian genius then the people who work for him are.

    destructure

    March 24, 2017 at 6:29 pm

    • If Trump was a real leader wanting true reform in America, red ink would be pouring out of the Capitol by now, that one gets to see with a bleeding polar bear.

      JS

      March 24, 2017 at 9:38 pm

      • What are you talking about?

        destructure

        March 25, 2017 at 9:42 am

      • Who is Trump? He’s just a clown, not a reformer. If he was for real, he would have his own vigilante law enforcers.

        JS

        March 25, 2017 at 10:19 am

      • ICE claims that Trump is the first president to have their back. Illegal crossings are down 40% since he took office. And there’s a spike in illegals leaving the US and headed for Canada.

        destructure

        March 25, 2017 at 12:57 pm

  8. The long knives are out. The MSM are peeing themselves in glee over this “Hindenburg”. There is much spiteful joy in Demland tonight!

    But in the medium to long term, this strengthens Trump’s agenda. He’s established street cred with many Members. They owe him now.

    This certainly breaks the spell of the evil Ryanbeast. Trump was generous in his praise for Ryan, but….

    gda

    March 24, 2017 at 7:18 pm

  9. Trump should use this opportunity to make Paul Ryan look like a weak leader, and wrest control of the Republican Party agenda from the establishment.

    He may be able to convince people of that but the fact is that Trump got behind the bill in a big way and it’s used all his vaunted deal making abilities and charm and still completely failed. He ran right up against the political division and inertia that blocked so much of what Obama wanted to do. So far Trump doesn’t look like any better of a politician than Obama.

    Magnavox

    March 24, 2017 at 7:31 pm

    • Obama was a phenomenal politician. Very weak line of criticism.

      Otis the Sweaty

      March 24, 2017 at 8:02 pm

      • Maybe as a campaigner. He was a terrible president politically. Completely ineffectual and disinterested. Trump was supposed to be someone that excelled at and enjoyed the give and take of actually being president.

        Magnavox

        March 24, 2017 at 9:50 pm

      • Trump wanted the title, not the job. He doesn’t know what the job entails.

        Anthony

        March 24, 2017 at 11:01 pm

      • how was he terrible? He passed the stimulus, Obamacare, got cuts to the payroll taxes pushed through, got 2 justices confirmed, put DACA into law, flooded the country with immigrants/ended immigration enforcement and won all his showdowns with Congress. He did all of this despite only having the votes to get any kind of legislation passed for his first 2 years in office.

        If Trump isn’t playing a longer game here, this isn’t a failure of his political skills, it is a failure of his political strategy. Nobody could have pushed this monstrosity of a healthcare bill through

        Otis the Sweaty

        March 24, 2017 at 11:29 pm

      • Remember, Obama’s GOAL wasn’t to make America great, it was to manage America’s decline.

        Lion of the Blogosphere

        March 25, 2017 at 12:02 am

      • To respond like TUJ: Trump wanted the title, not the job. He doesn’t know what the job entails

        Good, so let the country fall apart, like a NYC landlord waiting for its old tenants to die, so 20-somethings could move in and pay market rate rent.

        JS

        March 25, 2017 at 12:01 am

      • I find it hard to give Obama credit for having an opposition thats willingly spreads and lubes its own ass cheeks.

        Panther of the Blogocube

        March 25, 2017 at 12:06 am

      • Remember, Obama’s GOAL wasn’t to make America great, it was to manage America’s decline.

        Only like western and northern European nations are “in decline”, as in really fucking nice places to live on average. One of his big failures is that he wanted to build that new america out of medicaid babies and hispanic immigrants. The other big failure was that he was not good at and did not enjoy politics, which arguably he didn’t need because Hispanic immigrant babies are the status quo.

        Magnavox

        March 25, 2017 at 9:10 am

      • “Only like western and northern European nations are “in decline”, as in really fucking nice places to live on average.”

        There is a lot of ruin in a nation, particularly in rich, first world ones. But the dumb decisions made over the past few years will come back to bite them…hard.

        Mike Street Station

        March 26, 2017 at 10:32 am

  10. There’s a “Medicare for all” bill introduced in the House by Rep. John Conyers, D, Michigan.
    https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/676/text
    If Trump were really a Machiavellian genius, he’d throw his support behind it and gin up just enough Republican support to push it over the top. And I say this as a conservative physician. It wouldn’t be a stretch for Trump, as he was in favor of single payer just a few years ago.

    Kosher Kowboy

    March 24, 2017 at 7:35 pm

    • Great idea. That is quite possibly the most ingenious thing Trump could do to boost his political power through classic triangulation.

      B.T.D.T.

      March 24, 2017 at 7:48 pm

      • I was hoping Trump would triangulate with his cabinet picks but he completely failed to do that. There may be a real chance of Trump being impeached which could prevent him from doing it even if he wanted to.

        Magnavox

        March 24, 2017 at 8:20 pm

    • Yep – trump wasn’t really an out of the box hard nosed negotiating genius like he fashions himself to be. He would’ve had Bannon running backchannel with pelosi and schumer on the side to float a public option bill (Medicare for all would’ve been a bridge to far). I think he could’ve sniped off enough R’s together with every dem on the hill for a public option.

      Simba of the blogosphere

      March 24, 2017 at 7:50 pm

      • One of the problems is that Trump has very little leverage because he’s such a liar. Not to mention that he can’t stop blabbing. He simply lacks the personality traits and skills successful negiotators have. This was a great analysis, I thought:
        http://www.businessinsider.com/republican-healthcare-plan-trump-deals-2017-3

        Part of the author’s thesis is that Trump’s greatest asset is simply marketing. But that seems very tied to his popularity. Right now, “fear of defying a Trump” is an important consideration to many R’s who fear constituent backlash. But if the president becomes seen as deeply unpopular and incompetent, then what?

        FreddyG

        March 25, 2017 at 10:39 am

    • Had a hospital CEO (MD) tell my Republican club today that single payer was pretty much the only way out of this message.

      Fine..But with open borders? Gah.

      Mrs Stitch

      March 24, 2017 at 8:18 pm

    • I would support that but it would do nothing or almost nothing to solve the real problem, which is total healthcare spending. You would have to make medicare a price maker that establishes price controls for health care.

      Magnavox

      March 24, 2017 at 8:19 pm

      • Medicare is, for all practical purposes, a price maker, or rather CMS is ( https://www.cms.gov/ ). In fact it’s not unusual for contracts between providers and payors to slot pricing in terms of the Medicare price, i.e. the allowable charge for procedure X is set at 130% of Medicare, or what have you.

        Kosher Kowboy

        March 25, 2017 at 6:35 pm

      • My admittedly limited understanding is that isn’t true. That they, like all insurance companies, have a register of what they will pay but it’s based on what different providers charge and not an analysis of their costs

        Magnavox

        March 25, 2017 at 9:56 pm

  11. Mestizos from the south of the border are usually not H-1B holders. I’ve come across a few White Hispanics from Mexico and Puerto Rico who are software engineers, and these guys are the exception rather than the rule.

    For all your East Asian readers out there, it would make sense that White America limit H-1B holders from the Pacific Ocean, with the exception of Australia.

    JS

    March 24, 2017 at 8:04 pm

  12. Paul Ryan was the biggest loser today and that may have been Trump’s plan all along. He gave him enough rope to hang himself and the future of his speakership. He and Bannon must know that Ryan needs to be replaced to enact the full agenda, especially on immigration. There is no doubt that Trump will get his revenge sooner or later.

    B.T.D.T.

    March 24, 2017 at 9:53 pm

  13. Paul Ryan, and all Republican bowel-movement conservatives, are SOULLESS GLOBALISTS. They are the epitome of corrupt management that only cares about upholding the power and prestige of management; at the expense of the workers and the whole damn business. They are paper-pushing mediocrities who can’t accomplish anything except producing mailers lying about their hard stance against immigration, etc.

    I’m ashamed I *ever* voted Republican. They are worse than the Left. The Left, at least once, had the moral core of labor rights in the face of unequal bargaining power. The Republicans are crony capitalists who have done a much, if not more, to flood this country with “cheap labor.”

    fakeemail

    March 24, 2017 at 11:17 pm

  14. Personally, I am happy with the repeal failing. Not that I really cared one way or another.

    What was absolutely hilarious was that the bill was not discussed in any detail anywhere. I mean, seriously, the system is so inefficient that no serious discussion is possible on a bill that could be changing the future of our country. It was also pretty funny that the repeal could still pass b/c some dems did not care enough to vote against the repeal. Apparently, on any given day, lots of congressman are just AWOL from their job.

    Nice blog, dude

    March 25, 2017 at 2:39 am

  15. One of the big problems with how we do politics in this country is this obsession with these grand, sweeping, comprehensive pieces of legislation. That’s why I’m extremely skeptical of immigration reform. Trump said in his speech to Congress that he thinks he can pull off a grand deal, and it’s just a matter of work. I foresee a complete re-run of this health care mess: a comprehensive immigration reform bill that is too moderate for hardliners, yet too hardline for moderates.

    FreddyG

    March 25, 2017 at 10:33 am

  16. I don’t think that Obamacare or a single-payer system are good ideas. I support repealing Obamacare because in some areas of the United States, most people don’t want it. Health system should be left up to the states. If blue states want Obamacare, let them have an Obamacare that only exists in their states. If red states want a completely private system, let them have it too.

    Hader

    March 26, 2017 at 10:12 pm

  17. I’m sad this failed.

    I don’t like Obamacare, but the people on Obamacare can’t just have their policy yanked right away. This approach, stripping all of the cost driving regulations and taxes from Obamacare was the right approach. Within a year or 2, Obamacare would disappear because the private plans were less expensive.

    Of course as long as “pre existing condition” coverage was in the bill, costs would go up for the consumer, but Trump said that had to stay during his campaign.

    The real point of this bill: it was a massive tax cut for the middle class! (Even if it didn’t fix healthcare) (Even if it’s failures could be used by the Democrats in their coming pitch for more centralized control over healthcare).

    Rotten

    March 27, 2017 at 2:31 am


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