Lion of the Blogosphere

Today’s David Brooks column

David Brooks column.

A commenter asked me to write about it. Because Steve Sailer already wrote about it.

David Brooks writes:

Recently I took a friend with only a high school degree to lunch. Insensitively, I led her into a gourmet sandwich shop. Suddenly I saw her face freeze up as she was confronted with sandwiches named “Padrino” and “Pomodoro” and ingredients like soppressata, capicollo and a striata baguette.

Steve Sailer writes:

Perhaps the disbelief about Brooks’ column is that Italian words are pretty easy for Americans to more or less pronounce, while the formerly dominant French cuisine words were more difficult.

Actually, for me, the disbelief about Brooks’ column is that he has a friend with only a high school degree.

* * *

My problem with high-end Italian sandwiches is that they contain raw ham (prosciutto) which I find quite unappetizing when you have to eat a big mass of it.

Written by Lion of the Blogosphere

July 11, 2017 at 9:10 pm

Posted in Bobos

113 Responses

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  1. Yep, smells like BS.

    GondwanaMan

    July 11, 2017 at 9:17 pm

    • Actually, for me, the disbelief about Brooks’ column is that he has a friend with only a high school degree.

      It’s a girl.

      I led her into a gourmet sandwich shop.

      Rifleman

      July 12, 2017 at 2:47 am

      • The fact that she’s supposedly a woman makes Brooks’ story even more incredulous.

        Maybe a long-time secretary, or something similar?

        renault

        July 12, 2017 at 8:33 am

    • In reality, Brook’s story is irrelevant:

      She’s likely not young or nubile, and neither is Brooks, a late baby boomer.

      Most urban White Millennials have a college degree and feast in establishments that serves up pricey fare with funky names that sound way cooler than what Brooks is describing.

      JS

      July 12, 2017 at 7:26 am

      • Well, Brooks does do pretty well with young, (relatively) nubile women, especially for a 55-year-old dork.

        renault

        July 12, 2017 at 11:53 am

      • Boy, Maryk wasn’t kidding about his teeth. With the money he has there’s no excuse for that. I wonder if he’s living beyond his means.

        Richard

        July 12, 2017 at 12:56 pm

      • She looks very ethnic, along the lines of Yakov’s people.

        JS

        July 12, 2017 at 1:01 pm

  2. Journalists are losers because they use all their friends and families as tools for their journalism.

    Imagine being that high school educated “friend” used to point out the social shame of these LOSERS around high social status elites like himself?

    What a jerk.

    jjbees

    July 11, 2017 at 9:32 pm

  3. I think it’s pretty common for pundits, bloggers, and other opinion writers to fabricate anecdotes (fakecdotes?) to lend support to their arguments. My basic rule of thumb is that if a claim is self-serving and unverifiable, it’s most likely false.

    fortaleza84

    July 11, 2017 at 9:34 pm

    • It’s probably more recycling anecdotes they’ve heard from others and/or embellishing anecdotes to better fit their point. Re-anecdoting? An-exaggerating?

      snorlaxwp

      July 11, 2017 at 10:12 pm

  4. I can’t believe that David Brooks doesn’t know the difference between a “diploma” and a “degree.”

    Gerald B

    July 11, 2017 at 9:50 pm

  5. For me, the disbelief is that both you and Brooks use the phrase “high school degree” when high schools don’t grant degrees.

    Hermes

    July 11, 2017 at 9:55 pm

    • I’m just repeating Brooks. Who is a NY Times columnist and has an editor who checks his columns.

    • A quick websearch shows The Atlantic, WaPo, CNN, CBS News as well as the University of Arizona all making the same error.

      Richard

      July 11, 2017 at 10:31 pm

      • As did several of Sailer’s commenters. I think it’s a little piece of evidence of the cognitive stratification of our society–everyone who reads such articles has a degree and associates only with others who have degrees, so they think of a “degree” as the bare minimum level of education and forget that there are people who actually completed a level of schooling yet don’t have degrees.

        Hermes

        July 12, 2017 at 12:23 am

    • I say “high school degree” more often than “high school diploma”, here in western Canada. Or just refer to the person as a high school grad, or as having finished grade 12. “Diploma” usually refers to what you get after taking a two or three year program at a technical school.

      Rosenmops

      July 11, 2017 at 11:41 pm

    • The word “degree” is useful to confer the abstract notion of a given level of education. The word “diploma” suggests the concrete piece of paper that has “diploma” written on it. When I use it to refer to an abstract level of education, it sounds like I’m using it as a metaphor, which perhaps I don’t want to do. So if there wasn’t a word that means “level of education in the abstract sense”, then it would be useful to have one. But fortunately there is, and it’s “degree”.

      If a word is commonly used to mean something, and everyone understands what they mean when they say that word, then the word means that thing, regardless of pedantic attempts to argue otherwise.

      Wency

      July 12, 2017 at 8:16 am

      • “If a word is commonly used to mean something, and everyone understands what they mean when they say that word, then the word means that thing, regardless of pedantic attempts to argue otherwise.”

        Very well said.

        Lion of the Blogosphere

        July 12, 2017 at 8:28 am

      • What’s well said? There is no such thing as a HS degree and I’d never heard anyone talk like this. Yeah, you could say HS certificate and everyone will understand, but you don’t just bastardize the language and say it’s OK. HS Degree is pidgin.

        Yakov

        July 12, 2017 at 11:28 am

  6. David Brooks doesn’t just have one working class friends, but two!

    On July 4th he wrote about his working class Trump-supporting friend:

    “For example, I have a friend who is an avid Trump admirer. He supports himself as a part-time bartender and a part-time home contractor, and by doing various odd jobs on the side.”

    David Brooks spends his free time hanging out with his part-time home contractor friend and his high school grad friend. They hang out together at gourmet sandwich shops and Mexican restaurants.

    Jimi

    July 11, 2017 at 9:57 pm

    • For some reason I snort-laughed when I read the last paragraph…

      GondwanaMan

      July 11, 2017 at 11:10 pm

    • Certain working class jobs are making a comeback as cool/hip, and it’s already happening with Hipsters who live in Manhattan working as bartenders, barbers and carpenters within their own community/social network, and this isn’t along the trajectory of Yakov and his HVAC endeavors, where he randomly services a variety of people from all over the place.

      JS

      July 12, 2017 at 12:06 am

      • Nobody working as a barber (or other “ironic” blue collar job for that matter) lives in Manhattan.

        renault

        July 12, 2017 at 8:36 am

      • That’s incorrect. First of all, many people working non-ironically as hair stylists live in Manhattan. Secondly, there are hipsters in the Alphabet City and the Lower East Side.

        Lion of the Blogosphere

        July 12, 2017 at 9:24 am

      • Barber is an excellent trade! And so is a shoemaker. If any of my grand kids chose it, I’ll be perfectly satisfied. Both make good money. You have to be very artistic to be a good barber – it takes talent. Shoemaker not so much, but I know Georgian, Bucharan, and Jewish shoemaker that own their own houses on Brooklyn and live well. These are all cash businesses, which is a huge plus in NYC today.

        You know nothing about HVAC or my life, but you keep talking about it as if you are my accountant, or confessor, or something. The funny thing is that there are certain demographics that love to have an Orthodox Jew working for them. I have a bunch of evangelicals that love using me and while I’m doing my thing, we discuss religion and politics. Nice people. Trump supporters too. We have good times – I entertain them and bill them. Nice work, if you can get it.

        Is there any way that I can drill into your head that my work is fun and I enjoy it? Incidentally, barber is a great job. So I don’t know what your problem is.

        Yakov

        July 12, 2017 at 10:48 am

      • I believe that Yakov enjoys his work.

      • @ Renault

        Lion is correct. I know a few Hipsters who are in these “trades” and live in downtown Manhattan in gentrifying areas. A few guys made a mint designing and constructing the decorum of bars, boutique shops and even movie sets. I think Lion once mentioned Hipsters are able to self actualize and do all sorts of fun things and get paid a living wage, because of their social circles. Hipsters are your quintessential white sheeple with self actualizing jobs.

        JS

        July 12, 2017 at 12:55 pm

    • I’ve no doubt this “friend” is fake too. Why doesn’t he call them what they really are? Employees.

      Mike Street Station

      July 12, 2017 at 6:18 am

    • This can best be understood by reading the previous Brooks columns about why no one wants to hang out with him, euphemistically “bailing”.

      Lion of the Turambar

      July 12, 2017 at 9:48 am

      • I was gonna read that, but something else came up, I don’t remember what…

        Njguy73

        July 12, 2017 at 5:46 pm

  7. Perhaps the disbelief about Brooks’ column is that Italian words are pretty easy for Americans to more or less pronounce, while the formerly dominant French cuisine words were more difficult.

    Actually, SWPLs know that the “correct” way to pronounce the names of Italian foods, according to prole Italian-Americans, involves bizarre, non-phonetic pronunciations, like “SOUP-er-sahd” for soppressata and “gah-buh-GOOL” for capicola.

    Hermes

    July 11, 2017 at 10:03 pm

    • “…the linguistic situation in Italy is quite complicated,” says Mariapaola D’Imperio, a professor in the linguistics department at Aix-Marseille University who was born in Naples and studied in Ohio before moving to France.”

      “…Italy is a very young country made up of many very old kingdoms awkwardly stapled together to make a patchwork whole…Its citizens didn’t speak the same language, didn’t identify as countrymen, sometimes were even at war with each other…About 80 percent of Italian-Americans are of southern Italian descent…They’re clustered in New York City, Long Island, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and in and around Philadelphia…Basically the old Italian kingdoms each spoke their own languages that largely came from the same family tree, slightly but not all that much closer than the Romance languages, like French, Spanish, or Portuguese…”

      And then there’s a bunch of stuff on vowel deletion and voiceless consonants.

      http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/how-capicola-became-gabagool-the-italian-new-jersey-accent-explained

      Njguy73

      July 12, 2017 at 5:36 am

  8. Lol this is so insulting to write. I mean to his ‘friend’ with a high school degree..

    Kaz

    July 11, 2017 at 10:03 pm

  9. Haha. I wonder if David Brooks’s imaginary friend also gets intimidated by that bastion of elitism, Olive Garden, with its intimidating menu items like “Capellini Pomodoro” – http://www.olivegarden.com/recipe/capellini-pomodoro/man-imp-reci-prd-23

    What an out of touch story.

    Alex

    July 11, 2017 at 10:47 pm

  10. For the LoftB, it sounds like another guido festival.

    David Brooks might be a liar in this regard, but it’s no surprise that ignoramuses in Staten Island continue to vote Republican year after year, much ado about nothing. Ironically, they are able to explain the ingredients coming from the Italian DELIghts.

    JS

    July 11, 2017 at 11:11 pm

  11. Brooks is not a bad guy and he does have writing talent. But he really isn’t an original thinker. And he barely qualifies as a conservative. Most of his views are boilerplate neocon . I’ll never understand how he became so famous.

    But Brooks’ obsession with status and status-markers and social class is pretty extreme. It’s interesting how the same trait can come across differently from different people. Lion has this same obsession, but on him it’s quirky and interesting. On Brooks it just comes across as shallow and annoying. I have no idea why.

    Maryk

    July 11, 2017 at 11:16 pm

    • “Most of his views are boilerplate neocon . I’ll never understand how he became so famous.”

      The first sentence answers the question you raise in the second sentence.

      ice hole

      July 12, 2017 at 1:00 am

    • Yes Brooks is a bad guy. A very very bad guy.

      Otis the Sweaty

      July 12, 2017 at 1:09 am

    • “I’ll never understand how [David Brooks] became so famous.”

      He became famous because liberal institutions like the New York Times and public television like to keep him around as a pet conservative.

      John D'oh

      July 12, 2017 at 1:41 am

    • Any obsessing with status weather Lion’s or Brook’s or anyone else’s is ridiculous. America is a free country and I’d never felt status having an effect on my life. I’ve got all the status that I need, whatever the hell status is supposed to be.

      Incidentally, Brooks wrote an idiotic column. Why is anyone even paying any attention to him? Dumb and dumber.

      I guess if I were to drive a Rolls Royce for a day I would see the difference in people’s attitude. But I don’t need it. Let them see who I realy am – just a little creature trying to make it and having a good time while doing it.

      Status seekers are ultimate phonies. This is very simple, so I don’t know why I’m even saying it.

      Obviously, I’d never heard off those sandwiches that Brooks is talking about and I’m never going to hear about them again. All they are is a shtick to make money from stupid customers, which is fine in itself, but I don’t care.

      Yakov

      July 12, 2017 at 2:45 am

    • On Brooks, it’s annoying because he is a try-hard.

      map

      July 12, 2017 at 3:32 am

  12. In Atlanta you have to “foreignize” the menu if you want to keep the wrong crowd out (nothing fried, also) – classical music also does the trick.

    Camlost

    July 12, 2017 at 12:07 am

  13. Try a bresaola with lemon juice, arugula, parmesan cheese, and olive oil.

    Dave Pinsen

    July 12, 2017 at 12:20 am

  14. America has traditionally been a place where proles can become nuveau-riches, and in time, old-money. In fact, this is the story of most, if not all “great” american families. Thus, in America, the main signaler of the upper class is simply money… a lot of it.

    In Europe, where society is not as fluid, the true mark of the upper classes is their network. Old families have known each other (as in marry, raise children along, or do business with) for decades, and in many cases, centuries. While it is very easy to create for oneself a happy, wholesome middle-class existence in Europe, it is virtually impossible to access the upper class. Regardless of how much money one has, one would would not have the network, know how, and savoir-fair required to be “in the club.”

    While Browne’s ramblings about prosciutto are akin to arriviste wishful thinking, I do see more an more in the US a tendency of upper classes to isolate themselves. Nepotism, connections, and corruption seem to be more important now for economic success than they were during the XX century. While it is true that a whole new breed of tech millionares entered the US elite in the past few years, the lion’s share of the wealth created by new technology has spilled over only to the already-wealthy families that own the venture capital firms that invested in the Googles and Facebooks. The US is creating its own “landed gentry” class as evidenced by a nepotistic billionaire president, tax cuts for the 0.001% in the agenda, and ever growing inequality metrics.

    Brown, and most other “social science” writers, miss the point entirely. SWLs’ trips to Iceland, organic quinoa salads, or Teslas are not marks of the new upper class. Whether you personally know Ivanka Trump, or Jamie Johnson is.

    trap-n-skeet

    July 12, 2017 at 12:47 am

    • In Europe, where society is not as fluid…

      stopped reading right there. the opposite of the truth but it’s truthy so it’s repeated ad nauseam. the confusion between facts and theories is truthiness.

      Beverly Hills Ninja

      July 12, 2017 at 4:54 am

      • I should clarify:

        In Europe, where there is less mobility between middle class and upper class,…

        I believe you are correct in that mobility from lower class to middle class in Western Europe is better than in the US.

        I stand by the rest of my comment, though.

        trap-n-skeet

        July 12, 2017 at 7:09 pm

    • All of the Western Euros that I’ve met in the states have cool occupations.

      Foreign journalist, sous chef, translator, and a CEO of a startup to name a few.

      It’s also quite interesting that I’ve not met one who works in Academia, because jobs at the American college campuses are for proles.

      Of course, I’m talking about non-Anglo proles. Not the recent Brits, the Irishmen or Scots who come to America and strive like regular White Americans.

      Then there are the Slavic and displaced Balkan Euros who are of a different mentality altogether. Yakov finds friendship among them. Those that talk about gaming the system and lucrative occupations regardless of class distinction, that sort of thing with an unsavory foreign accent…

      Poles, Serbians/Croatians, Albanians and Ukrainians, who else?

      JS

      July 12, 2017 at 7:52 am

      • I know a German woman who’s a computer programmer. Not cool.

        I knew a British guy with a prole job at a government agency.

        Lion of the Blogosphere

        July 12, 2017 at 8:15 am

      • I knew an Australian plumber. Wow! 6′ 4″, strong, smart, he started working for peanuts and in 2 years had a thriving business. Excellent plumber he was. America has always been the land of opportunity. That’s how I understand ‘Make America Great Again’ – keep it the land of opportunity for hard working enterprising people and the last place you want to be in, if you are a lazy European socialist like JS.

        Yakov

        July 12, 2017 at 10:11 am

      • This sounds too much like an 80s song:

        Buying bread from a man in Brussels
        He was six-foot-four and full of muscles
        I said, “Do you speak-a my language?”
        He just smiled and gave me a Vegemite sandwich
        And he said

        I come from a land down under
        Where beer does flow and men chunder
        Can’t you hear, can’t you hear the thunder?
        You better run, you better take cover
        Yeah

      • Mate, now that you’ve mentioned it, Molson Australian beer is amazing! Australia is a pretty good place and I wanna visit. I like Australians, but you make money there?

        Yakov

        July 12, 2017 at 10:26 am

      • We don’t call Australians and Brits, Anglo Proles for no reason. In addition, there are a lot of Anglo Prole Canadians in America too. I know of a guy who grew up in Brandon (a city in Manitoba) and he is a teacher for a public school in Bushwick, Brooklyn. Of course, Lion knows that schools located in Bushwick could only mean a few things on this blog.

        I’ve only met 2 French Canadians in NYC. One was doing her residency (She was mixed race, perhaps with Amerindian, looks Hispanic) at a hospital and the other was a guy, who was working for the Québec Cultural Center.

        JS

        July 12, 2017 at 11:09 am

      • So why do Western Europeans and French Canadians live a better life than most Americans?

        And now that we are heading towards a post scarcity world, Americans exerted so much time and effort over what? A few are at the top of the income pyramid, and a lot are at the bottom. Americans still have a lower quality of life.

        Capitalism — did it bring wonders to America? America is kind of ugly and unsightly despite the entrepreneurial and ambitious nature of its citizens. Apparently not, because Donald Trump won the presidency.

        JS

        July 12, 2017 at 3:17 pm

      • the famous part french canadians i know are paul theroux and jack kerouac.

        the therouxs are an interesting family.

        Beverly Hills Ninja

        July 12, 2017 at 5:42 pm

      • JS, you have so many problems but they essentially boil down to ‘I don’t want work, gimme free money, I want to be happy and eat a sandwich that nobody ever heard of and sip a latte. It looks like your genes are very tired. America is not for you, but why do you keep dissing it? Why can’t you enjoy life? All you do is spread bad karma.

        Yakov

        July 12, 2017 at 6:29 pm

      • You fail to see my point because your definition of middle class is different than mine.
        Journalists, sous chefs, translators,… all proper middle class occupations. A successful small business owner in Europe (a successful plumber, craftsman, etc.) is also middle class.

        To me, key element of the distinction between upper and middle class is whether one needs to work to make a comfortable living. In Europe, it is easy to make a comfortable living, provided one works enough (enough can mean different things in different countries, but some level of work is still required). However, moving from this state to actual upper class in Europe will in most cases require some connection to ancient nobility, or secular land or corporation ownership. This is why I say that society in western Europe is less fluid (any comparison between America and Eastern Europe is misguided. Eastern Europe is more comparable to some Latin American countries).

        trap-n-skeet

        July 12, 2017 at 7:00 pm

      • So yes, the key point is comfortable living which is quite attainable in Europe — this you do not find easily in socially disconnected and cognitive dissonant America and the Anglo Sphere.

        Why do many Americans dream of going to Western Continental Europe to live the good life, and often studying abroad for those who are young? If not, they go to French Speaking Canada in North America.

        The Anglo Sphere has been a disaster, and worse, England, which is the core of the Anglo Empire is now being cannibalized by its own policies of out of control immigration. What’s even worse, the Anglos were always insular and never liked their subjects to begin with, so their societies were always segregated and non-integrated. It’s called Anglo Exceptionalism. The Anglo Sphere is one of the most delusional empires to come into existence.

        JS

        July 12, 2017 at 8:05 pm

      • And to further drive the run into home plate — English is the lingua franca of the world. A discussion brought upon by an Anglophone Canadian upset about the French Canadians trying to assert French as the only language of their home province of Québec. This person, a woman, emphasized that English is a global language, and it is the language of power and commerce. Coming from her arrogance, she said that French is only a language of nationality and culture, and these Francophone Canadians need to speak English in order to negotiate with the world. Basically, this sums up the Anglo Sphere. It isn’t about culture or nationality, it’s only about money and global influence.

        JS

        July 12, 2017 at 9:48 pm

      • I don’t want work, gimme free money, I want to be happy and eat a sandwich that nobody ever heard of and sip a latte.

        or the saying from paul and the puritans, he who doesn’t work doesn’t eat.

        i agree with lion that very few people have the subtlety, IQ, understanding, whatever to understand why this was more or less true 300 years ago, but is false today.

        i also understand why the commies didn’t grok it.

        once exploitation of feudal lord or capitalist is thrown off there was still a mountain of work to do. especially in places like in the former russian empire or what is still today the PRC. so stakhanovites and “heroes of soviet labor” made sense. but the russian version was always a per-version of marx.

        what yakov may not know is that marx predicted revolution in the most advanced capitalist countries not in russia or china or korea or cuba or whatever.

        in a way this has come to pass in western europe already. it was just effected without bloodshed.

        capitalism is choking on its own wealth. marx predicted it.

        btw, as chomsky has noted the ruling class in the US is 100% marxist, even more so than the nomenklatura. but their marxism is inverted. just like charles koch has lots of things to say which libtards might like, so does marx have lots of things to say that american “conservatives” might like…if only they read him.

        Beverly Hills Ninja

        July 12, 2017 at 10:00 pm

      • Ninja, if you were paying attention to my comments, you should think that I probably do know what Marx wrote about communism being the next stage of development for the industrial society. Why would you think that I don’t know that? This is the basics of Marxism. Mate, you and JS always think anybody who is a normal working chaps is an idiot.

        I remember these words of Benjamin Franklin from my HS American Literature course: ‘Early to bed and early to rise – makes a man happy, healthy and wise’. I thought it was a very good idea then. So I don’t know why you, who are supposed to have deep roots in America, bring irrelevant proofs from Marx, Russia and China. These things have nothing to do with a free enterprising, democratic America. Chomsky, he has roots in America? He cares about this country? He is a patriot? Who the hell is Chomsky? So he spits out some bombastic nonsequitur that all elites are more Marxist then nomenklatura. What does this mean? Nobody understands this, but they pretend that it’s something very profound and repeat like parots. So tell us what’s the meaning of these words?

        Yakov

        July 12, 2017 at 11:22 pm

      • ‘in a way this has come to pass in western europe already. it was just effected without bloodshed.’

        You are a riot. The advancement of the Western countries has proven Marxism to be false, not effected it without bloodshed.

        My father had an uncle in the States, who’d worked for the post office. So in 1969 he went on a trip to Europe, bought a Volkswagen van and drove all over the continent with his wife. He came to visit us on this trip and nobody, absolutely nobody, in the whole of the USSR had more freedom or lived better then him. Confident, fit, tanned, with a happy good looking wife – he looked like a man from another world, and he was. You and JS are just comical.

        Yakov

        July 12, 2017 at 11:37 pm

      • I think Yakov has gotten JS down to a tee!

        “JS, you have so many problems but they essentially boil down to ‘I don’t want work, gimme free money, I want to be happy and eat a sandwich that nobody ever heard of and sip a latte. It looks like your genes are very tired. America is not for you, but why do you keep dissing it? Why can’t you enjoy life? All you do is spread bad karma.”

        Great comment!

        Mike Street Station

        July 13, 2017 at 7:27 am

      • Because it’s fun and true. Your input on this blog is antithetical to any functioning democracy. No smart person should not waste their mind on trades, and no smart person in America should waste their time in a country where intelligence is not welcomed, only if its lucrative!

        JS

        July 13, 2017 at 4:27 pm

      • It’s not Molson it’s Forester ‘s, obviously. I was too tired, but nobody corrected me. You should try it, it’s excellent.

        Yakov

        July 13, 2017 at 7:03 pm

      • ‘Your input on this blog is antithetical to any functioning democracy.’

        Why is that? A functioning democracy doesn’t need HVAC techs or barbers? Only snobs to sit in cafes and slice balony?

        Your input on this blog is antithetical to any functioning society, let alone a democracy. Your genes are tired, you are a dinosaur, I’m telling you.

        Yakov

        July 14, 2017 at 12:49 am

  15. neogaf thread about Macron’s 100% true comments about Africa: http://www.neogaf.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1404202

    Probably worth reading the thread for yourself, but I will post any highlights that I come upon.

    Otis the Sweaty

    July 12, 2017 at 2:14 am

  16. Overall, the Gaffers are very supportive of Macron.

    People underestimate the woke Left. They know that Macron is one of them so they will give him some slack. Not all woke Left are red guard SJW types.

    Otis the Sweaty

    July 12, 2017 at 2:16 am

    • i would not be surprised if macron is the actual anti-christ.

      Beverly Hills Ninja

      July 12, 2017 at 4:51 am

  17. brooks is an immigrant. he arrived at age 18. ipso facto he has nothing to say worth listening to regarding the US. he’s nauseating. he’s also shorter than robert reich and looks like a chipmunk.

    Beverly Hills Ninja

    July 12, 2017 at 4:50 am

    • Didn’t he spend most of his childhood in the US?

      He attended Grace Church (same school as Matty Yglesias) and lived in Stuy Town for at least a few years of his childhood, eventually moving to Philly for high school if I recall correctly. Not sure how accurate wikipedia is re his personal life.

      renault

      July 12, 2017 at 8:45 am

      • i thought he left canada for u chicago. he’s a canadian. his parents were canadians. right? his dad was an english professor at NYU, the ultimate of out-of-touch-with-reality.

        he’s an example just like dinesh d’souza, steve hsu, and yakov. people without any roots in the US who lecture americans about america.

        1. they’re disgusting and despicable.

        2. america itself is such a pile of excrement that it allows this. it gobbles it up.

        affirmative action should exist, and it should be based on the depth of one’s roots in the US. native americans first, the descendants of slaves usually second, hillbillies third.

        a country whose essence is made-up every generation by new arrivals is not a country. it’s a joke that should be wiped off the face of the earth.

        Beverly Hills Ninja

        July 12, 2017 at 4:53 pm

      • ‘america itself is such a pile of excrement that it allows this. it gobbles it up.’

        If this is what you, a person that supposedly has roots in America, say about your own country, you and JS should shut up and listen to us, the immigrants.

        Had the colonists and early Americans not gotten rid of the Indians the country would now look like Brazil or Mexico. What affirmative action? What are you talking about? They, the real native Americans according to you, who lived here since forever need affirmative action, right? But a Chinese guy not speaking a word of English and not having any education doesn’t. You know why? Lemme tell you – it’s because the stupidest and the most ignorant of these Chinese respects work, education and teachers. This is so simple that I don’t know why I’m even saying it.

        Go talk to some of these Chinese, you gonna learn a lot about the US.

        Yakov

        July 12, 2017 at 9:31 pm

    • That’s reductions! I’m an immigrant and so what? Immigrants appreciate America more then the natives. Brooks is a Jew married to an Asian, and as such he is very messed up. Most Jews who marry out are messed up.

      Yakov

      July 12, 2017 at 10:14 am

      • Ridiculous.

        Yakov

        July 12, 2017 at 10:19 am

      • Brooks’ mannerism is very Jewish, despite a non-sounding surname!

        JS

        July 12, 2017 at 11:20 am

  18. Is he short? I didn’t know this. But he has awful teeth. You’d think with all his money he’d get some veneers or implants. I mean missing teeth is usually associated with trailer park trash, isn’t it?

    But on this topic of food with “exotic”” names, it should be pointed out that any food named in a language you don’t know will seem “exotic” to you. As will any sandwich named after a food that you’ve never heard of before. If a sandwich shop offered a “finocchio sandwich” most people in the US wouldn’t know what it was referring to. I would because I’ve always known that vegetable as “finocchio” since I grew up in an IA family. In fact, if the shop had called it a “fennel sandwich” I would have until very recently not know what it contained since I’d never heard that vegetable referred to by its English name. The same with the kitchen utensil called a “colander.” We have a different name for this in Italian and I hadn’t heard the word “colander” until I was well into adulthood. But there will always be words in your own language you don’t know. My former boss once thought it was funny that I’d never heard the word “cabal” before.

    Maryk

    July 12, 2017 at 8:39 am

    • Ridiculous.

      Yakov

      July 12, 2017 at 10:21 am

    • ‘My former boss once thought it was funny that I’d never heard the word “cabal” before.’

      You’d never heard if the’ Jewish Cabal’? Were you living under a rock? Just check out Unz or Sailer and you will learn all about it. This is odd indeed.

      Yakov

      July 12, 2017 at 10:23 am

      • What part did you find ridiculous, Yakov? Me not having heard of “fennel” or “colander” or the “cabal” part?
        Do you disagree that every individual has missed out on learning or learning about some widely used words? There are too many words in the English language for any of us to know them all. And yes, I’ve heard the phrase “Jewish Cabal” but this instance of “cabal” had the word in lower-case letters and didn’t have “Jewish” preceding it. Maybe that’s why I wasn’t making the connection. But at least I know the word now. Anyway, my boss was a schmuck to laugh at my ignorance.

        Incidentally, it’s only on LOTB that I can hear someone ask me “Were you living under a rock” and not be offended. After all, I may need HVAC service one day!

        Maryk

        July 12, 2017 at 11:37 am

      • So you did hear if the ‘Jewish Cabal’. Now it makes sense, because how can you grow up not hearing about it? There is no way you can.

        Yakov

        July 12, 2017 at 11:55 am

    • I always thought that finocchio=fanook. And that fanook=fagala.

      I’m sure that the public use of these terms, even in jest, are now regarded as human rights violations.

      Lewis Medlock

      July 12, 2017 at 4:28 pm

    • yes. mary k gets it.

      lion didn’t comment on it. i will.

      brooks is a “snob” in the pejorative sense.

      he takes fluency in italian gastronomic terms as a sign of sophistication and high class.

      what a loser. the problem is he’s the norm in the US. those in the US with high rank have no idea what class is. they don’t have it, and can’t get it.

      the high class american is lower class.

      he confuses those with taste for his inferiors.

      as those with taste do not share his tastes, he lumps them in with his genuine inferiors.

      Beverly Hills Ninja

      July 12, 2017 at 5:01 pm

    • I mean missing teeth is usually associated with trailer park trash, isn’t it?

      The teeth aren’t missing, they’re just shorter.

      MEH 0910

      July 12, 2017 at 11:15 pm

  19. Yo dummy, prosciutto is not “raw” ham. It’s cured/heavily salted. Hardly anyone puts it into a sandwich, either. Agree that Brooks is unlikely to have any friends who haven’t been to college.

    Explainer21

    July 12, 2017 at 10:46 am

    • A lot depends on what he meant by “friend.” If you mean someone you see regularly, I’d probably agree that it’s unlikely Brooks has any friends who are not college educated. But a lot of educated people have friends from their childhood who they still see on rare occasions – for old time’s sake. Often when you’re young you make friends with whoever is nearby rather than who you have a lot in common with. Then later on you grow apart because your interests and life goals differ so much.

      But there are exceptions to any rule. And there are also some people (rare, but they do exist) who are very well-read, better read than most college grads. These self-educated types are often very interesting to talk to. Check out a book called “The Priceless Gift” by a man names Cornelius Hirschberg. He was a salesman and worked a variety of menial type jobs but educated himself through independent reading. This book is out of print and on the pricey side, but well worth it. It was written in 1960.

      Maryk

      July 12, 2017 at 11:47 am

      • Would a guy like Cornelius exist in 2017?

      • Ray Bradbury also never went to college.

        Hermes

        July 12, 2017 at 3:18 pm

      • Why not? I’m that guy, albeit on my modest level of intelligence. But want to get better so I ordered the book for $45.

        Yakov

        July 12, 2017 at 5:53 pm

      • Yakov, I’m delighted that you ordered the book. May I indulge my ego a bit and ask if you bought the book because I recommended it or because you wanted to show Lion that self-learning people still exist? I’m hoping it’s the first because that would mean I’m moving up on the LOTB website social ladder! I actually would take more pride in being able to influence you than in being able to influence an SWPL like David Brooks.

        Not that I want you to break your budget or take too much time away from your religious study, but there are two other books I could recommend. “Self University” written in 1989 by Charles D. Hayes. And “Provoking Thought” by Leland Miles. Mr. Hayes makes the interesting claim that if a person is bothered by what he considers gaps in his knowledge due to lack of formal schooling or credentials, then he is probably underestimating what he’s learned on his own and overestimating how much others learned through formal training. Mr. Hayes also comes from the same town in Alaska as the Palin family. He should do the conservative movement a favor and knock on Sarah’s door, offering her a free copy!

        Maryk

        July 12, 2017 at 10:29 pm

      • For those who may be new to LOTB, what Yakov means by a “modest” level of intelligence is probably something in the 120-130 range. He means “modest” by the standards of the kind of people who read this blog, For the general population, a modest IQ is about 100.

        An interesting question (interesting to me, at least): How low an IQ can a person have and still be able to absorb and benefit from the posts on LOTB? My guess is that 110 would probably be the lowest – the high end of average, at least for whites. Also, it seems to me that anyone under the age of 25 would have to be exceptionally well-read to have the degree of knowledge (or “cultural literacy) necessary to follow these posts and conversation threads.

        Maryk

        July 13, 2017 at 8:28 am

      • I haven’t considered that my posts are over the heads of those under 25.

        Lion of the Blogosphere

        July 13, 2017 at 9:38 am

      • ‘May I indulge my ego a bit and ask if you bought the book because I recommended it or because you wanted to show Lion that self-learning people still exist? I’m hoping it’s the first because that would mean I’m moving up on the LOTB website social ladder! I actually would take more pride in being able to influence you than in being able to influence an SWPL like David Brooks.’

        Lolz! This is the funniest! This takes the cake! Lolz! Bought a book to impress Lion. I’m gonna platz (explode in Yiddish). Listen, I didn’t even know that you had recommended it. It looked like something that I would benefit from, so I got. It’s good to know that it was you who brought it up though. Thanks a bunch!

        Yakov

        July 13, 2017 at 8:39 am

      • Some of Lion’s posts are pretty juvenile, like when he goes on about video games, and TV shows, how Judaism is about chanting in a language he doesn’t understand, how the Jewish food is so horrible, how cows are dangerous and baloney like that. Anyone over the age of 25 and with an ounce of brain in hid head shouldn’t find them too interesting.

        Lion, you haven’t written about cows for a long time. What’s new happening on that front?

        Yakov

        July 13, 2017 at 11:22 am

  20. Luckily there is coursework you can complete so you can go to lunch with David Brooks!

    https://www.mcsweeneys.net/articles/course-catalog-for-david-brooks-elite-sandwich-college

    Mike Street Station

    July 12, 2017 at 1:59 pm

    • I disagree that mozerella should be pronounced with a silent a.

      Lion of the Blogosphere

      July 12, 2017 at 2:53 pm

      • Check the link posted by Njguy73 in reponse to me upthread. IA’s pronounce mozzarella as something like “mootz-ah-DELL” (not a true d, but a flipped r.) I actually agree with you, but IA’s consider themselves the final arbiters on “correct” Italian pronunciation, so if you say “mahtz-uh-RELL-uh” they just laugh at you and say that you are wrong.

        Hermes

        July 12, 2017 at 3:25 pm

      • It’s easy to see why Lion thinks this. He knows that only IAs pronounce mozzarella with a silent a. And Sicilians pronounce it “moozarelle.”

        Maryk

        July 12, 2017 at 4:05 pm

      • “I disagree that mozerella should be pronounced with a silent a.”

        Alas, David Brooks would never invite you to lunch. He would just shake his head and regard the class divide as unbridgeable!

        Mike Street Station

        July 12, 2017 at 6:13 pm

      • Guidos pronounce it with a silent “a”, thus that pronunciation is low class.

        Lion of the Blogosphere

        July 12, 2017 at 7:20 pm

      • From the article: “There’s something both a little silly and a little wonderful about someone who doesn’t even speak the language putting on an antiquated accent for a dead sub-language to order some cheese.”

        This reminds me of the SNL sketch where Jimmy Smits hosted. He plays an office worker ordering lunch for his Anglo co-workers who pronounce “burrito” and “chimichanga” with a thicker accent than him, and he’s like, “You don’t have to do that.” Then Bob Costas walks in, they ask him for his NFL picks, and Costas goes “I like SAN-FRAN-CIS-CO to beat TAM-PA-BAY” in a super-thick Latino accent.

        Njguy73

        July 12, 2017 at 8:03 pm

  21. Raw prosciutto is best consumed in very small amounts. Its salt and fat content result in poor “mouthfeel”, so it is usually served wrapped around melon balls.

    It is, however, a key ingredient in a recipe I found in Marcella Hazen’s Italian cookbook: saute peas with a clove or two of garlic, some parsley and prosciutto. Excellent with chicken piccata.

    sestamibi

    July 12, 2017 at 9:27 pm

  22. If you can’t say prosciutto you ain’t no friend of mine.

    Jim

    July 13, 2017 at 11:07 am

  23. Has everyone here seen the stir Brooks caused with this column? The internet is lighting up with articles and blog posts about it. And comments are running heavily against him. I can’t remember the last time Italian deli meats got this much attention!

    Maryk

    July 13, 2017 at 7:22 pm

    • I look at Brooks’ condescension towards his less cultured inferiors as a wider symptom of the Anglosphere’s lack of appreciation for anything foreign, especially if it isn’t Eurocentric.

      French Canadians take the heat from their Anglophone counterparts for being insular and not globally aware (after all, English is the universal language, and not your provincial Froggy lingo). What delusional Anglophones don’t understand is that their domains are disgustingly decrepit, intellectual backwaters. And again, this starts with the bookstores and I mean bookstores that promote culture, not just book browsing.

      I walked the streets of Montréal and it’s literally littered with bookstores throughout the city, and many of them display books with a cultural or subject theme. This is a Western Continental European concept. Just walk the streets of Madrid, Barcelona, Paris and Berlin, and many bookstores are of this kind. It could be a foreign theme. One bookstore in Montréal is currently selling books about the Middle East and there is an array of books being displayed which are nicely arranged and decorated with related marketing material in the backdrop. Next week, the same store might promote books about Greco-Roman themes, and books about Aristotle, Homer and the Roman Empire would be aligned in the store display, along with decorative marketing images of hoplite soldiers and the Coliseum. Now walk the streets of London and New York City, and tell me if you find this kind of artistic and creative flair.

      JS

      July 13, 2017 at 10:05 pm

      • There are all sorts of specialty bookstores in Manhattan.

      • i know very little about Canadian culture, so I can’t comment on the validity of JS’s claims regarding how many bookstores there are In Montreal or their quality. And yes, in general, it is always better to have a lot of bookstores. But he should keep in mind that owning books is not synonymous with reading them. There is a certain kind of person why owns tons of books on “intellectual” type subjects and rarely even glances at them. I’m not even referring to the “so many books, so little time” type of person who simply can’t limit his book purchases because there is so much he really want to get around to reading – he buys his books and always plans to read them “eventually.” I’m talking about the kind of person why buys books to feel superior to others and really has no intention of ever reading them. JS isn’t this type, of course. But such types exist, and we don’t know how much of the clientele for bookstores falls into this category.

        Maryk

        July 13, 2017 at 10:39 pm

      • Canadian culture consists of Anglo and French elements with remnants coming from the indigenous population. Anglophone Canadians are like Americans, basically they seem to lack the refinement (what we call classiness) found in other civilized groups and they also consume American pop culture. Where as the French Canadians are their own thing and they also consume a lot of French trends from the other side of the Atlantic, which is essentially European in origin. There seems to be a 2 way street as well, because quite a number of books published in Montréal/Québec have the Euro prices on them. This you do not find with books published in Anglophone Canada.

        JS

        July 14, 2017 at 12:14 am

      • “There are all sorts of specialty bookstores in Manhattan.”

        A helluva lot less than there used to be.

        Lewis Medlock

        July 13, 2017 at 11:02 pm

      • Yes, the number of bookstores are declining, because of Amazon, because of ebooks.

  24. I’m not even referring to the “so many books, so little time” type of person who simply can’t limit his book purchases because there is so much he really want to get around to reading – he buys his books and always plans to read them “eventually.
    An interesting question (interesting to me, at least): How low an IQ can a person have and still be able to absorb and benefit from the posts on LOTB?

    DevBlog

    August 5, 2017 at 6:38 am

  25. DevBlog posted two sentences from my posts on this thread. Yet he posted no comments of his own about them. I’m not really sure why.

    maryk

    August 5, 2017 at 11:16 am

    • Well, he could post this: American White women have a lower educational attainment than women in Spain and Canada, and this speaks volumes.

      JS

      August 5, 2017 at 1:18 pm


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