Lion of the Blogosphere

Star Trek Voyager S02E02 Initiations

I watched another episode of this series so I could compare if it’s better or worse than The Orville, and I’d have to say that it’s worse. A lot worse.

The episode starts off with Chakotay doing some American Indian religious ritual alone aboard a shuttlecraft. How is it that, in the future, all of the major Earth religious like Christianity, Islam and Buddhism have completely disappeared, but some obscure hokey American Indian religion still lives on? Why would they let Chakotay take a shuttlecraft for such a silly reason? Up until the Voyager series, the impression I had is that the Federation supports freedom of religion for lesser alien species, but it’s heavily looked down upon for Starfleet officers to participate in such primitive beliefs.

And it does not seem like a bad idea to allow Chakotay to wander around alone in a dangerous sector of space with a precious shuttlecraft? If it’s destroyed, how will they get more? And yes, it does get destroyed. But somehow the Voyager has infinite shuttlecrafts, with no explanation as to how that’s possible.

The young Kazon kid was so obviously the same actor as Nog from Deep Space Nine, it made the episode very hard to take seriously (despite the fact that the show tends to take itself ridiculously seriously). You keep thinking, how did Nog wind up in the Delta Quadrant looking like a Kazon instead of a Ferengi?

Chakotay is supposed to have previously been a fighter in the Marquis, which is an anti-Cardassian terrorist organization. He must have killed many Cardassians. So when encountering an alien species like the Kazon, who appear to be just as poorly behaved as the Cardassians, if not more so, why wouldn’t Chakotay shoot first and ask questions later? But of course that’s the opposite of what he does. He should have gotten killed for it, except that Voyager always preaches to us that as long as you do the morally right thing, then everything will work out in the end. This moral preachiness is why I really can’t stand this series. Why did I torture myself my watching another episode?

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And in other news, The Orville is the Donald Trump of science fiction, hated by the elite critics, but loved by regular viewers. See Rotten Tomatoes.

Written by Lion of the Blogosphere

September 12, 2017 at 8:03 pm

Posted in Television

13 Responses

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  1. And it does not seem like a bad idea to allow Chakotay to wander around alone in a dangerous sector of space with a precious shuttlecraft? If it’s destroyed, how will they get more? And yes, it does get destroyed. But somehow the Voyager has infinite shuttlecrafts, with no explanation as to how that’s possible.

    The Voyager itself should have been destroyed or rendered inoperable early in the series because it took all sorts of damage (and steady loses to minor crew members) without being near a Federation starbase where it could have stopped for repairs and maintenance.

    The Undiscovered Jew

    September 12, 2017 at 8:47 pm

  2. You should have finished season 2 of TNG and started season 3 instead.

    The Undiscovered Jew

    September 12, 2017 at 8:49 pm

  3. And in other news, The Orville is the Donald Trump of science fiction, hated by the elite critics, but loved by regular viewers. See Rotten Tomatoes.

    And Discovery is Hillary Clinton.

    Ideally the Lion will serve as the “Electoral College” of science fiction by breaking the tie between Orville vs Discovery over which series gets cancelled first.

    The Undiscovered Jew

    September 12, 2017 at 9:00 pm

  4. And in other news, The Orville is the Donald Trump of science fiction, hated by the elite critics, but loved by regular viewers. See Rotten Tomatoes.

    I don’t think rotten tomatoes voters are representative of “regular viewers”. Star Trek style science fiction really appeals to aspergery people because of the way it downplays interpersonal conflict and resolution in favor of dumbed down intellectual challenges and meaningless technobabble. It also indulges that groups worst impulses towards unearned sanctimony by presenting the shows robotic characters and aspergers friendly workplaces as more evolved and superior to what exists in the present day (and the past of the timeline of the show).

    I haven’t seen The Orville though. Although I did see that the show covered up a super attractive actress, Halston Sage, in unflattering alien makeup.

    Magnavox

    September 12, 2017 at 10:15 pm

    • “I did see that the show covered up a super attractive actress, Halston Sage, in unflattering alien makeup.”

      Amen to that. They learned nothing from the fate of Seven of Nine. Reveal, don’t conceal.

      That thing on her forehead makes her look like she has Down’s Syndrome.

      Comic Book Nerd

      September 12, 2017 at 10:56 pm

  5. I am not what you call a regular viewer, Lion, but Trump was my number one choice when there were 17 candidates (my other two choices would have been Santorum or Cruz but neither had the passion of Trump, and we were voting for somebody who would do something, not somebody who would win philosophical arguments). That being said, every single science fiction TV show is mostly bad most of the time, we only like them for reasons of nostalgia and for the occasional moments of interesting insight into the human condition, or for the humorous references to whatever little scraps of knowledge we might have about STEM subjects, and sometimes there is good music or good acting. There have been a couple hundred English-language sci-fi series and all of them were, generally speaking, a waste of time. I mean, they were of historical interest, but …. Maybe there were good Finnish ones or good Japanese ones but I don’t speak those languages.

    howitzer daniel

    September 12, 2017 at 10:45 pm

  6. “And in other news, The Orville is the Donald Trump of science fiction, hated by the elite critics, but loved by regular viewers.”

    The critics liked “The Orville” even less than they liked “A Million Ways to Die in the West”. And that’s saying something.

    Comic Book Nerd

    September 13, 2017 at 1:44 am

  7. Isn’t C-tay supposed to be from another planet or something where Indians are the boss?

    Greg Pandatshang

    September 13, 2017 at 2:07 am

    • Not that I am aware of, but there are many seasons of Voyager and I only watched the first season, so that’s something which could be revealed later.

      Lion of the Blogosphere

      September 13, 2017 at 8:00 am

  8. I thought Orville was fairly entertaining. It’s clear that Seth McFarlane was trying to do a straight up rip off of Star Trek, if the space ships were staffed by real people instead of Roddenberry automatons. A divorced couple fighting on the bridge I can buy that. Maybe it will wear thin after a few episodes but I thought it got off to a good start.

    Mike Street Station

    September 14, 2017 at 10:21 pm

    • I’m only on the second episode of season 2, I have a long ways to go to catch up.

      Also, I can’t believe that The Inner Light isn’t on the top 10 list. Nor is City on the Edge of Forever. Everyone knows those are the two best Trek episodes from the new and the original series.

      Lion of the Blogosphere

      September 16, 2017 at 10:56 am


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