Lion of the Blogosphere

The Orville S01E11

The funniest scene from this episode is Yaphit accusing Captain Mercer of racism against gelatinous people.

Written by Lion of the Blogosphere

December 1, 2017 at EDT pm

Posted in Television

9 Responses

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  1. “I have several gelatinous friends.”

    But he doesn’t live in the same neighborhood with them.

    That was actually a very good episode in the science fiction sense. They tried to both explain and show what a 2 dimensional universe would look like. That was a pretty good take on it, and it looks like some effort was made to make it seem plausible.

    Mike Street Station

    December 1, 2017 at EDT pm

  2. How much does Seth spend every year to “hold the fort” on that that hairline? He’s going in for surgery annually.

    bobbybobbob

    December 1, 2017 at EDT pm

  3. That was pretty funny. But I thought this was even funnier. So awkward.

    destructure

    December 2, 2017 at EDT am

  4. In this episode, MacFarlane wants us to believe that LaMarr has an IQ in the top percentile. I don’t buy it. Like LaMarr, Rick Rosner and Chris Langan also live the simple life. But, unlike LaMarr, they also have nerdy hobbies. Rosner writes brain twisters in his spare time, and Langan develops his “Cognitive-Theoretic Model of the Universe”.

    I liked the way this episode provided a plausible reason for why Doctor Who’s TARDIS is bigger on the inside. The inside exists in extra-dimensional space!

    Mad props for using “Flatland” as source material. I wish the writers had done more to examine the biology and sociology of Flatlanders, like the book does. I don’t understand how the shuttle could have dragged the Orville across flat-space without causing a massive and disruptive collision.

    There is a good book called “Flatterland” by Ian Stewart that takes the story of Flatland and develops it even further than Edwin Abbott did:

    Comic Book Nerd

    December 2, 2017 at EDT am

  5. We are made to believe that LaMarr, who is black, was a genius all along. He did not use his genius IQ in the past, even when he or the whole crew were in life-threatening danger. LaMarr chose to keep acting stupid in “Majority Rule” for example, when he was threatened with lobotomy. Like with Michael in STD, his genius is established by him uttering some mindless Star Trek techno-babble.

    Kirk, Bones and Spock were in contrast actually believably smart characters.

    Wikipedia:
    “Though intellectually gifted, the farming colony from which he originates was not encouraging towards “eggheads”, and wanting to be liked, he learned to hide his intelligence and settle for modest ambitions.”

    Translation: Farming colony = The Ghetto. “Don’t be an egghead” = “stop acting white”. Ambition is not a heritable personality trait, but genius is.

    This is now the second episode that addresses black dysfunction. The first was “Into the Fold” in which black female doctor Finn was presented as an overburdened baby momma with unruly kids and the moral of the story was that black boys need fathers. This time the lesson is that blacks only need the encouragement and affirmative action from liberals like Captain Mercer and Kelly Grayson to come to their full potential. LaMarr gets a leg up and Yaphit has to step aside.

    The writers are apparently moderate liberals or moderate conservatives who don’t believe that white racism explains everything and that blacks should just act more white. What are they trying to accomplish with this nonsense? Do blacks even watch the show to get the message? I really liked Lamar and he was a perfect fit in his previous function.

    P.S.: Liberals believe that farming does not require intelligence and that farmers don’t appreciate competence in their community.

    Contrarian

    December 2, 2017 at EDT am

    • LaMarr chose to keep acting stupid in “Majority Rule” for example, when he was threatened with lobotomy. Like with Michael in STD, his genius is established by him uttering some mindless Star Trek techno-babble.

      Kirk, Bones and Spock were in contrast actually believably smart characters.

      Greg Cochran once noted that really smart people might be smart enough to emulate normalcy even though they weren’t that, specially in the case of John von Neumann. Perhaps LaMarr was pulling a von Neumann.

      JayMan

      December 2, 2017 at EDT pm

    • In the Communist Manifesto, Marx wrote about the “idiocy of rural life” and how socialism would eradicate it.

      Lewis Medlock

      December 3, 2017 at EDT am

    • Seth MacFarlane is liberal, but also politically incorrect, so I think he throws these little bon mots in his show as Family Guy type easter eggs.

      Mike Street Station

      December 3, 2017 at EDT am

  6. Norm Macdonald was also the voice of Pigeon on Mike Tyson Mysteries.

    MEH 0910

    December 2, 2017 at EDT pm


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