Lion of the Blogosphere

Harvard students are smarter than you think

Commenters insisting that 3 standard deviations above average is exaggerated.

Well that’s not true.

According to this source the average new 1600 SAT score at Harvard is 1540.

And according to this source, 1540 is top 0.4%

That’s 2.65 standard deviations above the mean SAT score, but because a large percentage of lower IQ student don’t bother to take the SAT, the median SAT score equates to higher than the median IQ score.

So 3 standard deviations above average is approximately correct.

Harvard students really are the best of the best.

Written by Lion of the Blogosphere

December 30, 2017 at EDT pm

Posted in Education

69 Responses

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  1. It’s not that we don’t think Harvard students are smart. Rather, being smart is necessary but not sufficient to get into Harvard. To get into Harvard requires someone to be a certain kind of ass-kisser that many find off-putting. Also, at any state college, there is someone who scored high enough on the SAT’s to get into an Ivy League school. The problem is that we judge colleges by the dumbest person we know who went there. I am just as guilty as anyone else. I have no respect for West Virginia University because I know someone who is literally retarded who went there.

    ScarletNumber

    December 30, 2017 at EDT pm

    • This is so true. Acceptance and success at elite colleges is as much about ass-kissing as it is about intelligence.

      Sad!

      GondwanaMan

      December 30, 2017 at EDT pm

      • Same goes with success in life gondwana.

        mpt

        December 31, 2017 at EDT am

      • Agreed.

        …… even chess masters (have you read Kasparov on politics? – right or wrong, he is clearly in above his head) and intense mathematicians (have you read Witten on anything distant from differential geometry – right or wrong, he is clearly clueless) are not all that bright when they attempt to explain the world, in a way that an intelligent person would explain it if said intelligent person were, actually, aware of the facts of the world..

        “Harvard” is a fiction some of us repeat to ourselves when we want to thing there are smart people out there.

        There aren’t.

        howitzer daniel

        December 31, 2017 at EDT am

    • “Rather, being smart is necessary but not sufficient to get into Harvard. To get into Harvard requires someone to be a certain kind of ass-kisser that many find off-putting.”

      Assuming that’s true (and I think you are probably correct), that would increase the expected Jewish percentage at places like Harvard since Jewish people are probably more willing to do all the ridiculous BS necessary to get in.

      fortaleza84

      December 31, 2017 at EDT am

    • lion was just talking about IQ, not other qualities

      grey enlightenment

      January 1, 2018 at EDT pm

  2. Quote: “Harvard students really are the best of the best”

    It would probably be more correct to say that Harvard students really are the smartest of the smart.

    Joe Walker

    December 30, 2017 at EDT pm

    • There are really almost no smart people in the world.

      Elite colleges have lots of people who are good at ticking the right box, and people who are genuinely smart often spend time there. But the box tickers and the genuinely smart people are there for different reasons.

      howitzer daniel

      December 30, 2017 at EDT pm

  3. IQ is not normally distributed. The tails are way fatter than gaussian. Percentile oriented gaussian arithmetic on all sorts of biometrics are often fairly useless.

    bobbybobbob

    December 30, 2017 at EDT pm

    • “IQ is not normally distributed. …”

      I thought IQ was defined to be normally distributed.

      James B. Shearer

      December 31, 2017 at EDT am

      • Test scores are “normed” for the results to approximate bell curve. Problem is, norming sample sizes are not huge, typically on the order of N ~ 5,000. Thus, only few points exist on the extremes and they tend to be insufficient to eliminate fat tails that naturally exist. Bottom line: outside +/-3SD, for all practical purposes the scores are pretty much meaningless.

        mapman

        December 31, 2017 at EDT pm

      • “… eliminate fat tails that naturally exist. …”

        Fat tails don’t naturally exist if IQ is defined to be normally distributed. There may be a problem with accurately measuring high IQ’s but that is a different issue.

        James Shearer

        December 31, 2017 at EDT pm

  4. Intelligence and wisdom are two completely different things. A lot of intelligent people are very foolish. Anyone familiar with my comments has seen my explanations for why this is true. I read a study over the past week that basically confirmed this. But I can’t seem to find it now. Regardless, I’m hardly the first person to notice.

    https://pjmedia.com/rogerkimball/2008/9/5/the-boston-phone-book-harvard-and-sarah-palin/

    destructure

    December 30, 2017 at EDT pm

  5. Well, you surely remember Pumpkin Person’s research into this.

    Someone who scores 3 standards above the mean on the SAT would only score 2 standard deviations or so on a test like the Wechsler due to regression.

    Pumpkin thinks the average IQ of Harvard students is even lower than that. Like 1.5 standard deviations above the mean. Regardless, I don’t believe for a second that Harvard students are 3 standard dev above the average.

    Anecdotally, I know a guy doing a medical-related Phd at Harvard. Smart, but nowhere near genius. I was in a calculus class with in high school and we got roughly similar grades.

    GondwanaMan

    December 30, 2017 at EDT pm

    • To clarify, keep in mind the SAT isn’t a pure IQ test. It tests conscientiousness and attentiveness to academic-related knowledge (particularly vocabulary, grammar, and basic algebra/geometry concepts).

      I’m sure there’s a 145 IQ guy out there somewhere that would bomb the SAT.

      GondwanaMan

      December 31, 2017 at EDT am

  6. They’re cheaters. When test scores are that high, even at Harvard, they smell funny. They’re also lucky, in that so many people take the SAT and so few spots are available at Harvard that quite a few intellectual middleweights simply have a lucky day when they took the SAT and rolled high by chance.

    High scorers who go into state schools are less likely to be juiced, which is why they’re rewarded with scholarships and a bigger alumni network. They’re worth it. They have more fun, too.

    https://www.huffingtonpost.com/grown-and-flown/cheating_b_1858896.html

    Cheating is so common everywhere, and ubiquitous at the elite level, that one suspects testing’s real function is to filter out morally sound traditionalists. Intelligence isn’t a real factor at all, just a front operation, and the back of one’s head knows this. The results certainly show that leftists and atheists and reform Jews (I know, I know) are utterly, predictably dominant in the Ivy League.

    Most intelligent people now simply want to work ordinary jobs, but better and faster than ordinary, and find more success in ordinary life (plus a bit of entrepreneurship) than in a cutthroat corporate rat race. Elite careers are sterile IQ shredders.

    Anonymous Fake

    December 31, 2017 at EDT am

  7. This all comes down to test prep. I took the SAT with no prep, then bought a princeton review book and went through it over the course of 3 or 4 days, and my score went up over 200 points.

    SAT test prep and study apps are extremely good now. The difference between a Harvard level score and a mediocre score is having your parents being aware of the availability of such, and forcing you to do it. The average IQ at Harvard is not as high as you would expect based on test scores.

    jjbees

    December 31, 2017 at EDT am

    • Everyone preps for the SAT, so it’s not a factor.

      Lion of the Blogosphere

      December 31, 2017 at EDT am

      • And assuming you got at least a half-decent high school education, I doubt prep for the SAT really does much beyond the 50th hour or so of study. Although I think some of the graduate exams benefit from slightly greater amounts of study (particularly the LSAT).

        GondwanaMan

        December 31, 2017 at EDT am

      • I thought it was cheating to study for the SAT. It was a scholastic aptitude test. Surely, the test won’t measure properly if you study for it. (yes, my parents and I were that naive.) Still managed to get the average SAT score of a Harvard student. I went to Arizona State University.

        Brodda

        December 31, 2017 at EDT am

      • This 2009 article in the WSJ reports on a study that found “SAT coaching resulted in about 30 points in score improvement on the SAT,” on average. And that’s most likely a boost from 1150 to 1180 rather than from 1550 to 1580: https://www.wsj.com/articles/SB124278685697537839
        Commenter Jibees’ score may well have gone up 200 points via a prep course, but that’s an extreme outlier.
        Other articles quote the College Board discouraging students from taking the test more than twice, as they claim there is no evidence of any boost from a 3rd or 4th test, but I remember in my case I took the SAT three times and each time my score was 30 points higher than the previous time.
        I wish I had done a prep course to get another 30 points; I was indeed aware that they existed, but I was too much of a pot-smoking burn-out at the time to care enough. I also wish I had taken at least one of the tests on a small dose of LSD, as I think that would work wonders: super focused, super lucid.

        PonPon

        December 31, 2017 at EDT am

  8. A quick Google search turns up estimates of average Harvard IQ ranging from 122 to 141. So, although an average of 145 is a stretch, it’s not completely out to lunch. But the article “Jewish math and HBD” implied that 145 is the floor, which is certainly not the case.

    Lest all this kvetching about details obscure the broader point, it’s worth reiterating that Jewish representation in a wide variety of cognitively challenging fields is consistent with current demographic percentages combined with the estimated +2/3–1 standard deviation Ashkenazic advantage in IQ.

    Lex Corvus ♔ (@LexCorvus)

    December 31, 2017 at EDT am

  9. This source, from 2014, lists the average SAT at Harvard as 1505. Your readers may enjoy scrolling through the entire list:

    http://www.businessinsider.com/smartest-colleges-in-america-2014-10

    ice hole

    December 31, 2017 at EDT am

    • The SAT was re-scaled in 2015, so you can’t directly compare scores from before and after that time.

      GondwanaMan

      December 31, 2017 at EDT am

  10. “…the average new 1600 SAT score at Harvard is 1540”
    That sentence doesn’t make any sense.

    Sense

    December 31, 2017 at EDT am

  11. Sat is a kind of IQ test like all mental activity ranking procedure. It’s correlation with the general factor of intelligence is 0.65. Some tests can have 0.85. Some others like grades (gpa) 0.4 . Rote memory knowledge has 0.1.

    Average SAT is at 2.66 sd of 1 in 250. If correlation with IQ were perfect it would be 140. There are 16000 person each year born in the US that are above this average. Harvard would have selected 5% of the most intelligent (800 students above 140). Note that this gives room to legitimate positive discrimination because if Harvard selected 50% of intelligent black kids, it could keep the 140 average for them.

    But as the correlation is 0.66 for individual, and a bit’ less for the group because it is selected on this specific criteria (let’s say 0.6), then the expected IQ is only 124 or 1 in 20.

    I think it is a bit higher because Harvard uses GPA wich correlates with g at 0.4. So probably the average IQ of Harvard college students is 130.

    That means that there are 100 000 person with an higher than average IQ and that Harvard select only 1 in 125. That’s why Harvard is not a brainy school like Normale sup in France or Engeneering school in India. Harvard then select people at graduate level and after PhD to get morr research capacity. For example, all top 5 Putnam scorers are admitted into Harvard PhD in math with scholarship !

    It is not a plot. The aim of Harvard is finding leaders . Not finding geniuses .

    Bruno

    December 31, 2017 at EDT am

    • The other consequence of Harvard selecting less than 1% of the intelligent people is that it can’t have much people with more than150 IQ (because 1% of 1 in 10 000 is 1 in a million). That’s why difficult classes like math55a and be were understood by less than 10 people (out of 150 interested in math). Because the program is structured for > than 150 people and they don’t have many of them.

      Bruno

      December 31, 2017 at EDT am

    • Asians at Harvard are probably the majority when it comes to STEM. Other students who are deemed more nativist than Asians, and also Hispanics major in “BS” fluff subjects.

      Either way, Harvard is a business school without a business major requirement. Most of its graduates work in finance and consulting upon graduating.

      JS

      December 31, 2017 at EDT pm

      • Harvard undergrad is so against practical business education that it doesn’t even offer a class in accounting! Harvard students who want to take accounting have to take it at M.I.T.

        Lion of the Blogosphere

        December 31, 2017 at EDT pm

      • This country is all about the intrinsic bottom line, which is the $ sign.

        Going to Harvard allows you to beat around the bush in the name of privilege, not afforded to other people, who attend the lesser Ivies and lower schools that follow them.

        JS

        December 31, 2017 at EDT pm

  12. By the way, your source his wrong. The best source is Crimson, Harvard gazette. They say SAT is 2234 or a 1490 and not 1540. It is 1 in 70. But two wrongs can make a right. Because you have to double this score because the people who pass the SAT are the highest potential scorers. ETS calculates the percentile if all population passed the test . So it is a 1 in 140 or 138 IQ is correlation weee perfect (wich is not ) .

    http://features.thecrimson.com/2016/freshman-survey/makeup-narrative/

    Bruno

    December 31, 2017 at EDT am

    • Keep in mind the SAT was re-scaled/re-normed in 2015, thus boosting scores by about 50 points.

      GondwanaMan

      December 31, 2017 at EDT am

  13. If Harvard wanted the highest IQ, the only way would be to preselect all students with either a 4 gpa (5%) or top 4% sat (1400, it s meaningless above that ) . It could be like 200k people. And then propose them for free (during one week) several Mental ability tests (that would chance every year) and select 1%. Then probably it could have a 148 average IQ. The maximum, an 153 average IQ, is practically impossible because they would be to test 1 million people during at least one week each year.

    Then if you add that many high IQ people only want a good life, without being in a front page of magazine, and that above 150, many people have mental issues, that wouldn’t be a great idea.

    So probably Harvard is doing things right given it’s leadership objectives .

    Bruno

    December 31, 2017 at EDT am

    • “If Harvard wanted the highest IQ”

      Well Harvard doesn’t want that, they want the highest “LQ,” that is leadership quotient, graduates most likely to become the tops in whatever field they enter after graduating.

      Lion of the Blogosphere

      December 31, 2017 at EDT am

      • The class of 2017 surveyed, more than half of its graduates will end up in Finance and BS Consulting. Although the survey appears poorly conducted, it provides hints that most of its grads will take up these 2 value transference fields. There isn’t much diversity in career choice upon graduating, because unfortunately, most of it graduates are looking to hoard money coming from a prestigious learning institution. Furthermore, most of its grads will live in NYS, MA and California.

        http://features.thecrimson.com/2017/senior-survey/after-harvard-narrative/index.html

        MA appears suspect as a choice of residence, given the gripe that Harvard is underrepresented with lower class White gentiles, and MA is a state riddled with them and their heirs, whose population in the state far exceeds that of Jews of any socioeconomic class.

        JS

        December 31, 2017 at EDT am

  14. Judging Harvard students by IQ according to SAT score has the problem that SAT score is not an independent variable. SAT score is used to select Harvard students. Therefore Harvard is a collection of people who happened to do really well on the SAT.

    If you really wanted an unbiased way of judging the IQ of Harvard students, you would need an independent test.

    Also, the SAT is not an ideal IQ test. Vocabulary and math are things that can be memorized. With practice a person can learn every word that will appear and every math rule that will come up. Purer IQ tests involve strict pattern recognition unrelated to crystallized knowledge.

    Dan

    December 31, 2017 at EDT am

  15. Using SAT score to judge Harvard IQ when Harvard chooses students by SAT score is somewhat circular reasoning.

    To put it another way, wealth correlates strongly with IQ also.
    https://pumpkinperson.com/2016/02/11/the-incredible-correlation-between-iq-income/

    But if you used wealth as the admission criterion for an elite group and then turned around and said “this group is 0.01 percent elite on wealth and therefore is 0.01 percent elite on IQ” because IQ and wealth are correlated, that is obviously flawed reasoning.

    Dan

    December 31, 2017 at EDT am

    • The SAT *IS* an IQ test, the best IQ test that there is.

      Lion of the Blogosphere

      December 31, 2017 at EDT am

      • “… the best IQ test that there is.”

        Would Arthur Jensen agree?

        James B. Shearer

        December 31, 2017 at EDT am

      • I think he would agree with my point, and agree that the best IQ test that there is has never been developed because no one is interested in developing it, but there is no test normed and constructed better than the SAT.

        Lion of the Blogosphere

        December 31, 2017 at EDT pm

      • So what? A score on a “true” IQ test is itself a relatively noisy measure of IQ. You would still expect some regression towards the mean if you selected based on the score on an IQ test.

        dynkin

        December 31, 2017 at EDT pm

      • A Perfect IQ test is a test that reflects only the G factor . SAT is far from it .

        eyaldavid

        December 31, 2017 at EDT pm

      • Why does that make the test more perfect?

        It’s likely that the SAT actually reflects better a factor of what is needed to be successful in America.

        I also don’t believe that a test of fluid g devoid of any cultural bias or bias by how much experience people have with taking tests is possible.

        Lion of the Blogosphere

        December 31, 2017 at EDT pm

      • It’s likely that the SAT actually reflects better a factor of what is needed to be successful in America.

        That may be but that means it is measuring things other than IQ because things other than IQ are important for success. Which makes it a poorer pure IQ test.


        I also don’t believe that a test of fluid g devoid of any cultural bias or bias by how much experience people have with taking tests is possible.

        So what? You can’t build a perfect clock either but that doesn’t mean there is no point in trying to do as well as you can.

        The main problem with the SAT in the context of Harvard admissions is that it has been dumbed down so much that it doesn’t do a good job of ranking very bright people.

        James Shearer

        December 31, 2017 at EDT pm

      • Lion wrote,

        “The SAT *IS* an IQ test, the best IQ test that there is.”

        I don’t believe psychologists hold that view. I believe the consensus is that the best IQ test are generally the Raven Progressive Matrices, WAIS, and the like.

        The correlation between SAT and IQ is significant but not overwhelming. Here is the data analyzed in great detail, very recently:

        https://pumpkinperson.com/2016/12/14/how-well-does-the-sat-correlate-with-official-iq-tests/

        He found that a top SAT scorer had a median IQ (according to IQ tests) of around 120, which is a very good group IQ but off-the-charts high.

        Of course Harvard students have a top SAT score. That is WHY Harvard chose them. Harvard students do have a high average IQ. But certain not an average that is in the genius range.

        Dan

        December 31, 2017 at EDT pm

      • “there is no [IQ] test normed and constructed better than the SAT”

        This is just not so. The SAT tests static knowledge of many facts: vocabulary, math theorems and rules, how fast you read and the like.

        Tests like the Raven’s Progressive Matrices don’t require you to have such static knowledge. A kid with little schooling but who is very intelligent could do well on the Raven’s Progressive Matrices but is guaranteed to bomb the SAT.

        I got a 1600 on the SAT in 1996 with a top secondary education and a lot of prep and practice tests (recentered, not a perfect score) but I encountered many, many smarter people in physics and engineering at Cornell.

        Dan

        December 31, 2017 at EDT pm

  16. They may be educated and can pass test, but how many of them can do anything practical?

    Phd’s are some of the stupidest people I’ve worked for, and they have engineering degrees.

    Someone

    December 31, 2017 at EDT am

  17. Reading Lion’s ass kissing of the ass kissers is depressing. OK, so Harvard students are great test takers, and All Around Good Guys, forming non-profits in crappy little African countries, and so on.

    How many of them go on to become CEOs? I had a job once where I did bios of CEOs and I was surprised to see that most of them didn’t go to Harvard, or an Ivy. Most got engineering degrees from State U, and went on to get (at company expense) a buff management degree from an Ivy. Jack Welch is the prime example of this.

    An Ivy degree is a great signal for a white shoe law firm, which is Lion’s obsession, but no advantage anywhere else, except maybe a non-profit humanitarian relief company, which are all thinly disguised CIA fronts.

    Just to be sure, I spot checked where Darren Woods went to school: “Woods was born in Wichita, Kansas. He has a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Texas A&M University, followed by an MBA from Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management.[3][4]”

    I was right.

    Every. Single. Time.

    (Harvard boys are thought of in the REAL money making industries as phaggots.)

    gothamette

    December 31, 2017 at EDT am

    • Woods didn’t even go to an Ivy League B-school and he still did pretty well, and if you don’t know who Darren Woods is, you should.

      Hey Lion: is Rex Tillerson still SecState?

      gothamette

      December 31, 2017 at EDT am

      • Woods went to an M7 business school, which is sort of the “Ivy League” of graduate business schools, so I’m not really sure what point you’re trying to make here.

        ipc

        January 1, 2018 at EDT pm

      • The point I’m making is that going to an Ivy undergrad is irrelevant to success in business life. I take your point about Woods going to a prestigious B school, which only underscores the point I was making. Please read my original comment.

        gothamette

        January 1, 2018 at EDT pm

      • “going to an Ivy undergrad is irrelevant to success in business life”

        That’s way to strong of a claim. However, the phenomenon of CEOs not being Ivy material is a topic I’ve written about before: https://lionoftheblogosphere.wordpress.com/2014/10/12/ceos-of-big-corporations-only-have-iq-of-115-on-average/

        If you want to work in the most elite professions, like investment banking and management strategy consulting, then you need elite credentials.

        Lion of the Blogosphere

        January 1, 2018 at EDT pm

      • I stick by my claim. Going to an Ivy undergrad by itself is irrelevant to success in business life. I repeat: the vast majority of CEOs get some STEM degree, usually engineering, and then get polished in a prestigious B school. Yes, the Ivy credential will be there at some point along the way but not necessarily undergrad.

        gothamette

        January 1, 2018 at EDT pm

      • But they use every one of those points, while you and I sit around blabbing on the Internet.

        gothamette

        December 31, 2017 at EDT pm

    • This comment of yours was interesting.

      Stealth

      January 1, 2018 at EDT am

      • Which comment, and what about it was interesting?

        gothamette

        January 1, 2018 at EDT am

  18. At the University of Chicago they used to say “getting out is harder than getting in.” Now getting in is pretty difficult.

    Anthony

    December 31, 2017 at EDT am

    • “At the University of Chicago they used to say “getting out is harder than getting in.”

      As it should be. If people can get in and then just coast, it only spoils and flatters them. Highly intelligent people are capable of incredible errors of judgement (Iraq, anyone?), particulary when they don’t know what they’re talking about.

      Thomas Sowell attended Harvard as an undergrad and Chicago as a grad. His opinion of Chicago was much higher. As he put it: “At the University of Chicago the study of economics is a full-contact sport.”

      ice hole

      December 31, 2017 at EDT pm

  19. If you take the actual number 0.7%, then you won’t find discrimination for a 0.8sd advantage .

    Nb: And 0.7% is half the actual number given by Crimson, to take into account that the 1.6M who takes the test (there must be less as there are people repeating) are more clever than at least two third of the 2.4M who doesn’t.

    Happy new year to all commenters, from Amsterdam !

    Bruno

    December 31, 2017 at EDT pm

  20. I know of two guys who were rejected by Harvard undergrad a few years ago, even though they were much smarter than almost all Harvard undergrads. Each of them had 2 IMO gold medals, and both were Putnam fellows at MIT. One of them, as a freshman at MIT, explained to a Harvard math grad student how to solve his Ph.D. Thesis problem in algebraic geometry. (They wrote a joint paper about it.) That one is now a Harvard grad student in math.

    Calvin Hobbes

    January 1, 2018 at EDT am

  21. No! I’m not smart enough to validate my opinions with substantial proof, but hear me out. The average Caltech student is smarter than the average Harvard student because admission at the former is based more on a meritocracy. +4 SD is genius level, and the average Caltech student is not a genius. As a rough estimate you can put Caltech students at +3 SD and Harvard students at +2 SD.

    DaddyFrank

    January 1, 2018 at EDT am

  22. You are misled by the numbers. Harvard NEVER reports average test scores. They only give you the 25th, 50th, and 75th percentile. Having done research in this area, I can tell you that most of the Ivy League does the same, as does Stanford. This hides the low scorer among the bottome 25th percentile. They will not reveal more information than this. Though it is often the case, at Harvard, median test scores are NOT equal to the average.

    nohwon

    January 1, 2018 at EDT pm

    • The higher estimate is what you need to get into Harvard if you’re not black, Hispanic (but to a lesser extent than being black), an athletic recruit, or a rich legacy.

      Lion of the Blogosphere

      January 1, 2018 at EDT pm

      • Yes, but using it as a mean distorts the relative strength of the Harvard undergrad class precisely because of legacies, athletes, etc. In contrast, top students at Caltech are not that different from the bottom ten percent of Caltech. And that used to be true of MIT till they changed their admissions criteria a couple of decades ago.

        nohwon

        January 2, 2018 at EDT pm

  23. A Yale tenured professor of psychology had invented a test of 3 questions to evaluate decision making rationality. The test correlate at 0.77 with SAT and ACT. Harvard students had an average score of 1.43 with 20% with perfect answers. Highest score was at MIT with 2.16 and 48% with 3. Internet people had average of 1 with 17% perfect score.

    There is no way those students had a median IQ of 140 or more …. just look at the questions ! I needed less than one minute per question ….

    http://pubs.aeaweb.org/doi/pdfplus/10.1257/089533005775196732

    Bruno

    January 4, 2018 at EDT pm

    • The 0.77 correlation is among SAT and ACT. With the 3 questions test, it’s 0,46 with ACT and the same with SAT math. 0.44 with SAT. But only 0.24 with SAT verbal.

      Bruno

      January 4, 2018 at EDT pm

    • I agree it’s pathetic that everyone didn’t score 3.

      But the Harvard group was nearly all female, and females aren’t logical.

      Lion of the Blogosphere

      January 4, 2018 at EDT pm

      • Yes . They are 50% of the class and have the same SAT (a bit more verbal and less math). The guy should have corrected scores because he had identified the sex difference average .

        Bruno

        January 5, 2018 at EDT am


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