Lion of the Blogosphere

Mark Conditt – beta-male rage?

According to NY Times article he was a “socially awkward” kid and unemployed since he lost his job as “purchasing Agent/buyer/shipping and receiving” at a semiconductor company. Nothing about him ever having a girlfriend. His home-schooled Christian upbringing may have been conservative, but it was a very blue-pilled type of conservatism that did not prepare him for success as an adult in a secular world.

Why did he go to a community college? If he was smart enough to make bombs, he was smart enough to go to a real 4-year-college. Elliot Rodger was also at an educational institution that was beneath his intelligence.

I think this may be beta-male rage by bomb instead of by gun.

Written by Lion of the Blogosphere

March 22, 2018 at EDT am

Posted in Crime

37 Responses

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  1. Homeschooling is such an incredibly bad idea. I think even the worst public school in the worst neighborhood would be better preparation for life than keeping a child at home all day.

    McFly

    March 22, 2018 at EDT am

    • You haven’t attended bad public schools.

      During the busing era I got to spend a year, along with a cohort of fellow white guinea pigs, watching my ghetto schoolmates who’d been promoted to 4th grade try and learn to read. Real rewarding that year (Sarc off).

      Curle

      March 22, 2018 at EDT am

      • I was just riffing off the part of this post regarding Lion’s observations about how this guy’s “home-schooled Christian upbringing” did not prepare him for life, which is 100% true.

        It’s actually a good idea for children to get of their parents’ house and interact with other people. Depriving children of extra-curricular activities like sports, music, drama, all seems to be particularly disastrous for them. In fact, it just seems downright cruel. The sheltering/isolation of homeschooling is made even worse when combined with the profound ignorance of evangelical Christian culture.

        This is not theorizing, this is based on observations about homeschooling of close friends and relatives. Although, it seems to work better in practice for girls than for boys. (Perhaps because a sheltered girl can still be cute/attractive, be desirable and make friends.)

        I agree that ghetto schools are terrible, but the social norm of getting children out of the house and going to school absolutely needs to be respected. Your comment actually confirms another observation I’ve made: middle-class people who come into contact with people like your “ghetto schoolmates” become quite conservative.

        Anyways, I’ve enjoyed Jordan Peterson’s book and video, and a major theme of his video is “it’s better to make people competent than to make them” safe. Real-world experience is what makes people competent and mature.

        McFly

        March 22, 2018 at EDT pm

      • “did not prepare him for life”

        Specifically life in a non-home-schooled secular world.

        Lion of the Blogosphere

        March 22, 2018 at EDT pm

      • My grand daughter (grade 1) is being home schooled. I didn’t agree with it, but it is not up to me. She actually gets out of the house a lot. She takes dance, parkour and art lessons with other kids, Also there is a once a week “Forest school” that she attends with other kids. She had learned to read–she can read very well. I was worried about that.

        Rosenmops

        March 23, 2018 at EDT pm

      • It’s actually a good idea for children to get of their parents’ house and interact with other people. Depriving children of extra-curricular activities like sports, music, drama, all seems to be particularly disastrous for them.

        You are totally WRONG to think that home-schooled kids spend all their time in the parents house, do not interact with other people, and do not do extra-curriculars. (Heck, my kids are not home schooled, and they do most of their sports, music, and drama via teams and clubs that have nothing to do with the school system.)

        the social norm of getting children out of the house and going to school absolutely needs to be respected.

        No it doesn’t. Sending your kids to school means they will adopt the values, attitudes, and behaviors of their fellow students. In most cases, this is a BAD THING. They will become vulgar proles. Unless you live in a wealthy school district or can afford private school, your kids are far better off being home schooled.

        Tarl

        March 24, 2018 at EDT pm

    • Curle is right. It depends on how bad the school is. By “bad” I mean ghetto. Of course, there’s nothing wrong with the buildings, books or even a lot of the teachers. It’s the violent, low IQ students. I went to ghetto schools all the way through graduation. I’m working on some anger issues which I think that’s partly responsible for. Otherwise, I’ve done pretty well and been successful. But there’s no way I’d subject my children to that.

      destructure

      March 22, 2018 at EDT pm

      • Homeschooling is better than sending a kid to a school where he either gets beat up or learns to become a gang member.

        Lion of the Blogosphere

        March 22, 2018 at EDT pm

      • At least that prepared him for life in the real world.

        gothamette

        March 22, 2018 at EDT pm

      • None of this matters.

        Either you’re well greased like Jared Kushner or have a hard to come by, well paying career, which could fund a hedonistic lifestyle, post-college in a liberal center like NYC or San Francisco.

        Other than that, you’re stuck with misery in Meriprolestan.

        Last week, I saw a NAM teen walk out of a housing project wearing a Princeton University Sweatshirt.

        Our notions of White America is done!

        JS

        March 22, 2018 at EDT pm

      • “Last week, I saw a NAM teen walk out of a housing project wearing a Princeton University Sweatshirt.”

        He was probably one of the few good ones who want to have mainstream non-ghetto lifestyles and do white stuff like to to college and then have a career.

        Lion of the Blogosphere

        March 22, 2018 at EDT pm

      • My fearless guess is that most homeschooled children do NOT live in areas with bad ghetto schools.

        Peter

        ironrailsironweights

        March 22, 2018 at EDT pm

    • Mcfly, most of the homeschoolers I’ve known had their kids enrolled in myriad extracurriculars to the point of overkill. The school vs homeschool contest is not so black and white. Both can range great to dreadful.

      IME homeschoolers were roughly divided into three camps: hippies/ countetculteral types, religious wackos, and intellectual elitists. The religious and elitist homeschoolers gave their kids decent educations for the most part. The hippies were touch and go. I knew one lady whose son occasionally heated up a can of soup in between video games. She called that cooking class.

      toomanymice

      March 22, 2018 at EDT pm

    • I think McFly is right, but these people are correctly recognizing that mainstream culture is sick, even if their diagnosis is a bit off. The problem is that keeping your kids from absorbing that culture is pretty damn difficult. And “sheltering” can work in some cases: see the Amish. The problem is these homeschoolers are taking a sort of half-assed Amish approach: kids that are thoroughly sheltered growing up but then thrown into mainstream culture as adults.

      Basically, when it comes to sheltering your kids from the culture, you can either live in the mainstream while making some basic efforts at peer group selection, or you can live in Amish-style immersion. Anything in between results in kids that are placed under enormous stress when they reach the adult world, often ending up troubled or fully rejecting their childhood values.

      Wency

      March 22, 2018 at EDT pm

      • The Amish, like the Hasidim, have a society in which they ensure that young people are married off before the age of 23. Conditt’s Christian homeschool community apparently doesn’t have that.

        Lion of the Blogosphere

        March 22, 2018 at EDT pm

    • You don’t have kids, obviously.

      thordaddy

      March 22, 2018 at EDT pm

  2. It’s common for homeschoolers to take CC college courses when they are high school aged. Not sure if that is what happened here.

    toomanymice

    March 22, 2018 at EDT am

    • Yeah, it’s called Dual Credit, or Concurrent Enrollment. You get college credit AND high school credit, and the tuition is usually subsidized by the state.

      Half Canadian

      March 22, 2018 at EDT pm

  3. Why did he go to a community college? If he was smart enough to make bombs, he was smart enough to go to a real 4-year-college. Elliot Rodger was also at an educational institution that was beneath his intelligence

    I’m curious about that too, and guys that attend schools beneath their apparent IQ level tend to have psychological issues, but this is an empirical observation. Perhaps a post about this in the future?

    markus

    March 22, 2018 at EDT am

    • While making bombs and success at school are both IQ-related, we all know some people who are much better at working with their hands than at acing standardized tests.

      But he also probably didn’t want to go too far from home due to sheltered childhood, and he was too smart for that CC but too dumb for UT Austin. Or maybe sheltered childhood means he was afraid of large crowds of UT. There’s probably some other (private school) options in Austin that are worse than UT, I don’t know, but low-quality private schools seem pretty pointless to me.

      Take a school like Drexel University (as one example with which I’m loosely familiar): the tuition is 3x Penn State while the average SAT is comparable, so if you get into Drexel you should be able to get into Penn State. True, you might get a fat scholarship to Drexel, but that just means you should have applied to a better school.

      Wency

      March 22, 2018 at EDT pm

      • “While making bombs and success at school are both IQ-related, we all know some people who are much better at working with their hands than at acing standardized tests.”

        It wasn’t just about working with his hands, he had to figure out, with just the internet as his teacher, what to buy, how to assemble the parts, etc. I bet that only half of 4-year-college graduates today could figure it out. A lot of dummies have 4-year degrees.

        Lion of the Blogosphere

        March 22, 2018 at EDT pm

      • “Take a school like Drexel University”

        Orange buildings!

        Lion of the Blogosphere

        March 22, 2018 at EDT pm

      • making mail bombs isn’t that hard as far as conscience and IQ are regarded (85 is plenty), the problem is experience… if you’re completely naive than it takes maybe half a year (full time) and a high IQ but if someone taught u like to solder and so on during your teenage years than it’s quite straightforward

        again, more evidence of your (genetic) IQ being less than 120

        bombexpert

        March 23, 2018 at EDT pm

    • I’ve had the same empirical observation. They are under achievers and feel the pain of not living up to their potential and being separated from their natural peers. They’ve been ostracised.

      The lack of ability to apply oneself would belies bad social skills, sexual frustration, anxiety, lack of confidence, etc.

      fakeemail

      March 22, 2018 at EDT pm

  4. I read the Buzzfeed article and all it talked about was how he was home schooled, conservative, christian, etc. But I didn’t see any indication any of those played the slightest role. He wasn’t particularly religious. The only church they mentioned was 10 years ago and people from that church didn’t even remember him. Most of the people they interviewed from his home school group hadn’t seen him in 5 to 10 years. And the only thing he wrote that was even remotely political was for a US government class in which he admits he’s not political. Yet they write an entire article focusing on those things. Why? Because Buzzfeed is far left and like all leftists they’re prejudiced against home school, conservative and christian.

    There are very few reasons someone would plant a bomb. Pursuing revenge, pursuing some ideological agenda, maladjusted or some combination. I’ve seen no indication that he was pursuing revenge or any ideological agenda. And while he didn’t appear mentally ill he does seem slightly maladjusted ie a little awkward and isolated. But not so much that he was humiliated and lashing out.

    So the guy was definitely beta. But I honestly don’t see the rage either in his life or the bombs. Rage is beating someone to death with a bat, stabbing them 120 times or rampaging through a school trying to rack up a high score. Coolly making a handful of bombs that one quietly plants isn’t rage. Not saying bombs can’t be motivated by rage but bombs are less personal and emotional. They’re more cool and detached. This guy wasn’t rampaging. He just had a crappy, boring life and didn’t know what else to do. So he thought, “hmmm, might as well make some bombs.”

    Someone nailed it in the last post when they said it wasn’t “beta male rage” but “beta male ennui”. People who have something going on in their life (ie relationship, social interaction, employment, hobbies, sports, goals, etc) are much less likely to do something like this.

    destructure

    March 22, 2018 at EDT pm

    • “Pursuing revenge”

      Bingo. He wanted to get back at the world, for some reason.

      gothamette

      March 22, 2018 at EDT pm

  5. “Mark… Conned it.”

    In the radically autonomous environment, “fake news” of a “false flag” is the default assumption.

    The 24hr news cycle needs to have the break put on it.

    Let’s see that blown out body, first?

    thordaddy

    March 22, 2018 at EDT pm

  6. Can we get back to the real elephant in the room- Stephen Paddock?

    It was the deadliest mass shooting in US history but the press is conveniently ignoring it even though we received no answers.

    The fact that we know so little is itself of interest.

    Paddock brought 24 guns and a ton of ammo to his hotel room. If there is only one guy in the room why are there 24 guns? Sure the ammo could make sense but there is no way he did/could use 24 weapons.

    According to recent press reports he made multiple trips back to his home out of town to return with more bags to bring up. This is a big hassle to get more guns than he could potentially use.

    Also he had 3 cell phones- one of which hasnt been unlocked. Ok a BYOD, a COU but why does he need the 3rd phone? For something illicit- but there was nothing illicit about the prerequsits for his spree so why would he need to have the third phone? He can make hotel reservations on his regular phone. He can lookup ammo shops and ranges. Those are legal activities that arent going to ring alarm bells.

    So what illegal business was he doing with the 3rd phone?

    It seems a reasonable possibility to me that he was there doing some gun brokering. And I wonder if this shifty guard wasnt involved in some way.

    Lion o' the Turambar

    March 22, 2018 at EDT pm

    • Sometimes there aren’t any answers. I still say late-onset schizophrenia. More likely than some sort of Putin/ISIS conspiracy that’s being hidden.

      Lion of the Blogosphere

      March 22, 2018 at EDT pm

      • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoarding#Anxiety_disorder_and_hoarding

        According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition,[3] the symptoms for hoarding disorder include:
        ……
        F. The hoarding is not better explained by the symptoms of another mental disorders (e.g., obsessions in obsessive-compulsive disorder, decreased energy in major depressive disorder, delusions in schizophrenia or another psychotic disorder, cognitive deficits in major neurocognitive disorder, restricted interests in autism spectrum disorder).

        MEH 0910

        March 24, 2018 at EDT am

      • Hoarding Symptoms Are Not Exclusive to Hoarders

        Hoarding disorder (HD) was originally conceptualized as a subcategory of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and numerous studies have in fact focused exclusively on investigating the comorbidity between OCD and HD. Hoarding behavior can nevertheless also be found in other clinical populations and in particular in patients with eating disorders (ED), anxiety disorders (AD), major depression (MD), and psychotic disorders (PD).

        MEH 0910

        March 24, 2018 at EDT am

    • Ok but what is his purpose in shooting up the music festival? Still unexplained.
      And we know he didnt have anything organically wrong with his brain from the lab examinations.

      I am not saying Putin. I am saying that at least it seems likely that multiple people were/ or were supposed to be in the room.
      If the hotel guard was in on some illicit gun sale there would be huge liability for the resort, and so the actual purpose of Paddock being there with more guns than he could possibility use is being ignored.

      Lion o' the Turambar

      March 23, 2018 at EDT am

    • you can’t diagnose 99 % of mental problems from dead brains, most disorders are hard to get via multiple scans like fMRI, narcolepsy can target only 10 000 brain cells, for example

      and I doubt that the autopsy was done as thoroughly like u belive

      bombexpert

      March 23, 2018 at EDT pm

    • “Paddock brought 24 guns and a ton of ammo to his hotel room. If there is only one guy in the room why are there 24 guns?”
      “Also he had 3 cell phones- one of which hasnt been unlocked. Ok a BYOD, a COU but why does he need the 3rd phone?”

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compulsive_hoarding

      MEH 0910

      March 24, 2018 at EDT am

  7. Local Austin media reporting that the mailed bombs were addressed to a nurse or employee at something called a “MedSpa” – no word on the race of the recipient but the employees claim they were completely unfamiliar with the bomber and had no interaction with him. There are few black nurses in Austin (few blacks at all) but lots of Latina nurses. So maybe hate, but probably beta male rage.

    Paul Rise

    March 22, 2018 at EDT pm

    • I looked up MedSpa in Austin and it seems to be some sort of combination of cosmetic and plastic surgery services. Things like Botox injections, tattoo removal, ultrasonic therapy, laser hair remov – no I didn’t do it!!!!

      Peter

      ironrailsironweights

      March 22, 2018 at EDT pm

  8. If he was smart enough to make bombs, he was smart enough to go to a real 4-year-college.

    Tim McVeigh, Terry Nichols (Oklahoma City bombers) only briefly enrolled in (shitty) colleges, then dropped out.
    Eric Rudolph (Olympics bomber) was a high-school dropout.
    Samuel Joseph Melville (1969 New York City bomber) was high-school only.

    Tarl

    March 24, 2018 at EDT pm


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