Lion of the Blogosphere

Heat much more expensive than air conditioning

This is something I never realized (I guess because I get free heat from my landlord, and before that I lived in Phoenix), but according to this energy blog Americans spend more than four times as much on heating than they do on cooling.

This is why Florida is such a poplar retirement destination! It’s less expensive to live there because you rarely need to turn on the heaters.

Written by Lion of the Blogosphere

August 16, 2018 at EDT am

Posted in Science

48 Responses

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  1. Especially if you only do winter in Florida and summer up north. Then you don’t need heat at all!

    sestamibi

    August 16, 2018 at EDT am

  2. Cost of living is a lot less in Florida in general–of course, you do have higher transportation costs, and also a large number of NAMs/proles, a lack of amenities other than tourism and retirement crap, and a general cultural wasteland (JS can expound more on this).

    GondwanaMan

    August 16, 2018 at EDT am

    • JS can expound more on this.

      If you consider it “expounding” to merely repeat for the millionth time that the entire Anglosphere is prole, prole, prole in contrast to Quebec, and that Asians are obsessed with status, then yes, he can expound greatly.

      Hermes

      August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

    • Québec is a power source of affordability for heat, so powerful that it provides this energy to the Anglo Prole areas of Canada and Meriprolestan (like NY) coming from its hydro electric generators installed on its rivers.

      And Québec is at least 90% White, unlike Anglo Canada with its mosaic of incompatible peoples from all over the world, especially East Asia, who’ve become a source of angst as they overbid on real estate.

      JS

      August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

  3. I’m a little skeptical just because this is the complete opposite of my personal experience. My energy bill usually doubles in the months of June, July, and August before returning to a baseline the rest of the year. I guess it could be personal thermostat preference, though.

    Jokah Macpherson

    August 16, 2018 at EDT am

  4. Proles keep their houses COLD!

    Jjbees

    August 16, 2018 at EDT am

    • TOOS elites don’t even need heat…their self-evident socio-economic superiority is enough to keep them warm.

      Oswald Spengler

      August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

  5. According to wiki, Florida is 17% black, i.e. more than twice as schvarz-saturated as California. So I’m not going no matter how low the energy bill is. Besides, I hear there’s no check on property tax hikes.

    Department 11

    August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

    • Property tax in Florida is a LOT less expensive than the equivalent home in New Jersey, It could double and still be less expensive.

      Lion of the Blogosphere

      August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

      • According to liberals, real estate in Florida should be worthless because the entire state is soon to be completely underwater because of climate change.

        Hermes

        August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

      • There is something to be said that that swampy peninsula was not designed by Mother Nature to hold so many people.

        Lion of the Blogosphere

        August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

      • “According to liberals, real estate in Florida should be worthless because the entire state is soon to be completely underwater because of climate change”

        Their policies are more telling, stark demographic changes have an effect on real estate prices, which in turn sets the tone for culture and civilization.

        JS

        August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

      • It’s America’s wang, like the sage said. Let us hope no shrinkage ever occurs as long as it is ours to wield.

        Bill

        August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

  6. It makes perfect sense really – Comfortable temperature range is 15-25C, a really hot day is over 37C (Phoenix does it 107 days a year) – Only requires 12C of cooling to get to “comfortable”

    Take New york – the number of days a year where you need to cool more than 12C (3C or lower) is 206 days a year (and New york doesn’t really get cold)

    Simple thermodynamics – When it’s -20C out the amount of energy required to get to a nice 20C is roughly the same as the amount of energy required to cool down from 60C (one occurs with regularity, one never occurs)

    marcks

    August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

    • Cooling doesn’t work the same way as heating does, thermodynamically. “Waste heat” is a good thing when you’re heating.

      JayMan

      August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

    • According to Hydro-Québec, the company that harnesses massive electrical power for the French Speaking province and other regions of North America has a starting point of price compared to other North American regions.

      http://www.hydroquebec.com/residential/customer-space/account-and-billing/understanding-bill/comparison-electricity-prices.html

      New York City’s electricity price is 420% more than Québec, San Francisco being the worse offender is 440% more.

      So what gives?

      Utility companies have become the same value transference parasites of whom they serve!

      JS

      August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

  7. I thought you would link to the NYT article about painting Manhattan rooftops white. It probably doesn’t make sense cause any benefits in summer are negated in winter. But, you can show you care about climate change by doing it.

    RSF

    August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

  8. Wealthy people live in places where heating is necessary.

    Heat is therefore proper and not subject to the restraints of the Gaia religion.

    Wealthy people do not, as a rule, live in places where air conditioning is mandatory.

    Air conditioning is therefore prole and must be restricted in the name of Gaia.

    Justice Duvall

    August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

    • Air conditioning is mandatory in Manhattan, the “home” of the wealthiest. Have you ever been in Manhattan, right now? I don’t mean to be a drama queen, but without air conditioning there I would die, and so would ex-mayor Bloomberg, Barbara Streisand, Al Sharpton, and any other wealthy New Yorker you could name.

      Bill

      August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

  9. Heating expenditure is a function of the latitude.
    I bet to you that the heating bill at Antarctica is more than 4 to 1. Simply because they need heating more than cooling. Expense ratio is a function of need and not real cost.
    In reality, heating is always cheaper than cooling if you start from base room temperature. This is because every activity generates heat and not cooling. Your body generates heat, your motion generates heat, your electronics generate heat, everything generates heat. So you already got a lot of free heating. The energy needed for more heating is a lot less.

    Neal

    August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

    • This doesn’t wound right. Hopefully our resident HVAC expert will chime in.

      Lion of the Blogosphere

      August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

      • Even your HVAC unit generates a lot of heat so it costs extra to cool it down (you’re working against environment + HVAC). Heating is always cheap and easy that’s why even low IQ primitive people can do it with just 2 sticks whereas air conditioning is a great modern invention.

        Cooling is not easy nor cheap.

        Because heating is low tech, heating units are ubiquitous compare to air conditioning so they get used more often. People turn them on immediately when there’s even a small hint of a temperature drop. This increases the overall expenditure on heating compare to cooling.

        Neal

        August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

  10. You can always add more layers if cold, in fact wearing a winter coat indoors at 50F isn’t bad at all.

    But with heat, even if you dress light you’re still hot.

    toomanymice

    August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

    • I agree. When it’s cold, I usually set the thermostat low and wear a sweater. But there’s no way to compromise when it’s hot.

      destructure

      August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

    • There are many ways to reduce heat, especially the way you design the house, air directions, windows and insulation. I used to live in many different hot and humid places and usually managed without air condition in most days. Another thing is, heat doesn’t kill you, it might be uncomfortable but in hot places people just get used to it. On the other hand, if you don’t take care of warming yourself when temp drop you will just die.

      Hashed

      August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

  11. Florida also doesn’t require that much power in A/C. While it feels extremely hot due to the humidity, there’s a hard ceiling on temperatures at 100 F. Miami has one of the lowest record temperatures of any major American city. Generally in the summer Florida isn’t that much higher temperature than the Northeast. (Right now NY and Miami both are 88 F.)

    Cooling by 20 degrees uses significantly less power than heating by 50 degrees.

    Doug

    August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

  12. It’s basically the opposite here. During the winter I spend a little extra on heating (approx $70/month for electricity since my house has electric heating), but in summer my electric bill is over $150/month. Then again, I prefer the cold.

    Georgia Resident

    August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

    • During the winter I spend a little extra on heating (approx $70/month for electricity since my house has electric heating

      Holy dude! I spent ten times that, $700, during the coldest month last year! (I also live in frigid Canada and have multiple children and pets.)

      S.J., Esquire

      August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

  13. There are plenty of places in the US where you can live comfortably without HVAC. My home temperature never goes below 66 or above 81. Both extremes are comfortable if dressing smart.

    My 2¢

    August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

  14. Florida is a less expensive to live as a retirement haven, because its main target are proles who don’t mind living around NAMs who come from the Caribbean areas.

    Now tell me how many New Yorkers can afford to live in San Diego, let alone Manhattan!

    JS

    August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

  15. the article doesn’t say if one is more energy efficient than the other. raising temperature and lowering temperature should take the same amount of energy if both are perfectly efficient. but whereas many houses are heated with gas or heating oil, air conditioning uses electricity, which is less efficient.
    conclusion: americans pay more for heating for the same reason 70% of saudi electricity is used for air conditioning.

    because kim jong un

    August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

  16. I dunno what this is supposed to mean, but doing apples to apples, say 1 month of heating compared to 1 month of cooling. Cooling would typically be significantly more expensive because of the equipment that is used. Steam or water boiler use natural gas, an AC uses electricity as its source of energy. A heat pump would cost about the same to operate in either season. I haven’t followed the link, but I just can’t see how the cost of operating a steam boiler can be anything but a fraction of using an AC or a heat pump. Having said that, the modern inverter compressors are very efficient. For example, my daughter has 11 air handlers and 2 4 ton compressors. The units are on the whole summer and her monthly electrical bill is $700. In the winter it’s $500. If she would only use the hot water heating system, which she has, she could cut it even more.

    Yakov

    August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

    • Natural gas which is finite and comes from dinosaur times would cost more than electricity that can be generated from running water.

      No one with a functioning mind should be stupid to not understand this.

      Heat is expensive in America, because Manhattan’s real estate is expensive. Demand despite supply!

      JS

      August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

      • ‘No one with a functioning mind should be stupid to not understand this.’

        Mate you are a riot! Are you saying that steam boiler is more expensive than electrical coils to operate because of some dinosaurs that supposedly had turned into natural gas? Try selling this to a customer.

        Yakov

        August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

  17. In Southern California, I spend about $100 a year for natural gas-powered heating and $300 per year on electricity for AC. In both cases, I am generally adjusting the temperature by about 10 degrees, from 83 to 73 in the summer and from 55 to 65 in the winter. Utility natural gas is just very cheap these days, while electricity here is not. Rooftop solar actually makes sense here for large houses even without subsidies.

    This actually understates things, as I often just leave my gas heater thermostat at 65 for weeks at a time, while I never use my AC unless I am home. It would be more like a 6 to 1 ratio in cooling to heating costs if you account for this.

    pop

    August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

  18. This is why Florida is such a poplar retirement destination! It’s less expensive to live there because you rarely need to turn on the heaters.

    I’m three miles off Daytona Beach. My highest electric bill is $90 – $110 per month for June – Aug. From Dec. to Feb., it runs $35/mo; I turn on a space heater about 5 winter mornings per year. Nonetheless, June through August is brutal and I’m trying to plan for retirement with those months spent in the Colorado Rockies.

    I just had a new tankless natural gas water heater installed. It’s so efficient that the meter cannot register any nat gas use. I still pay $14/mo as the base rate, taxes, & fees. The old tank-style water heater ran about $30/mo including taxes and fees. The new tankless water heater will pay for itself in just under 100 months!

    I hear there’s no check on property tax hikes.

    No, there are strict checks and limits on FL property taxes, especially for one’s legal residence, if the residence is declared as the residents “homestead.” A FL “homestead” is allowed a $50K deduction off the assessed value of the property, and that assessed value cannot increase by more than 3% per year (and can decrease, even dramatically, as most all FL properties did in 2007 – 2012). FL city councils are severely restricted to how much they can increase, and how high they can set, the property tax millage rate each year (i.e. the prop tax per $1000 of assessed value).

    Property tax in Florida is a LOT less expensive than the equivalent home in New Jersey, It could double and still be less expensive.

    My FL property tax on my $250K (market value) single-family home is $600/yr and has decreased each year over the past five years. I bought the house ten years ago at a very low price when the market was crashing, so was able to lock in a low first-year assessed value (and, in turn, the subsequent years). A single-family home with a market value today of $250K and an assessed value of, say, $200K, would pay over $3000 in property tax.

    Nowhere Man

    August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

    • The same house in NJ would cost 750,000 to buy, and property tax would be 2% to 3% of that per year, 15,000 to 22,500 per year.

      Lion of the Blogosphere

      August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

      • Having grown up glorifying the American revolution, I don’t understand why any American would pay these exorbitant amounts. Where is the spirit of ’76?

        Yakov

        August 17, 2018 at EDT am

      • We can move to Florida.

        Lion of the Blogosphere

        August 17, 2018 at EDT am

      • Why would any White person in America revolt so they can see hordes of NAMs and immigrants benefit from the system?

        This is the gist of the problem and we have a police state in every little corner.

        JS

        August 17, 2018 at EDT am

      • ‘We can move to Florida.’

        So could the Founding Fathers, but they didn’t.

        Yakov

        August 17, 2018 at EDT am

      • Without air conditioning, they wouldn’t want to live there.

        Lion of the Blogosphere

        August 17, 2018 at EDT am

      • That was funny. Lolz.

        Yakov

        August 17, 2018 at EDT pm

  19. I live south of Tampa. My place is slightly less than 1000/sq ft., second-floor condo. My electric bill last month was $95.

    And I’m not sure why you folks are so worried about NAM’s. Outside of the Big Blue Citadels, they’re just simply not the factor you people make them out to be.

    raoulduke2767

    August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

    • California’s NAMs are Mestizo Latinos, while Florida’s NAMs are mostly Caribbean types. There’s a lot of blacks living in the Sunshine State, more than double the percentage of the Golden State.

      JS

      August 16, 2018 at EDT pm

  20. Some gas utilities are authorized by their state regulators to bill based on “normal” weather conditions (usually the average of the last thirty years’ heating degree days–a heating degree day is the difference between the day’s average temperature and 65). This means that in a very cold winter the customer would pay less and pay more in a winter that was warmer than usual. The theory behind it is that over the long run everything evens out.

    sestamibi

    August 17, 2018 at EDT am

  21. AC refrigeration cycle is few times more energy efficient than furnace heating. However, AC usually works on electricity, which is few times more expensive than natural gas (for the same amount of delivered energy). If you do not use natural gas for heating, you are screwed. If you use natural gas for heating, AC cost will be about the same as heating cost, assuming the same absolute difference between inside and outside temperature (Summer vs. Winter).

    My 2¢

    August 18, 2018 at EDT am


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