Lion of the Blogosphere

David Katz update

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6106961/Jacksonville-gaming-gunmans-parents-battled-schizophrenic-bitter-divorce.html

The father claimed she had diagnosed their sons with ‘affective disorders’, alleging: ‘Whether or not children suffer from an affective disorder is a matter to be determined by a mental health expert. There is no evidence that Elizabeth Katz is a mental health expert.’

In an affidavit on May 7, 2006, Richard Katz wrote: ‘David has informed me that he does not want to take the psychiatric drugs, they make him feel worse, and is making efforts to refuse them. I was unaware of David’s efforts to avoid taking these drugs until I was informed of them by David. I have not seen evidence of schizophrenia in David Katz.

‘Elizabeth Katz purchased medications for David after a single visit with the prescribing doctor, during which the doctor was given information that was not correct or significantly exaggerated.’

He continued: ‘I believe that Ms. Katz is not acting in the actual best interests of the children and that her conduct is inappropriate and suggestive of a possible mental disorder.

Consistent with my diagnosis that the mother had Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy, presumably the “possible mental disorder” that David’s father mentioned in the court filing. But obviously the family court believed the mother.

A classmate who attended Glenelg, an independent middle school in Ellicott City, Maryland, revealed to DailyMail.com that David Katz was picked on by other students. ‘I can tell you that he was bullied,’ the classmate, who did not wish to be named, said.

Most mass-shooters have that in their background.

Written by Lion of the Blogosphere

August 29, 2018 at 11:11 AM

Posted in Crime

10 Responses

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  1. I agree the mother is probably crazy. But that doesn’t mean David Katz is not crazy. The father may have been in denial, or not seen the boy at his worst.

    Rosenmops

    August 29, 2018 at 1:01 PM

    • Two questions for the more knowledgeable. 1. At what age should kids be given drugs for mental illness? 2. Can the drugs given for mental illness make a “normal” person crazy?

      cesqy

      August 29, 2018 at 3:23 PM

      • “2. Can the drugs given for mental illness make a “normal” person crazy?”

        Being treated for a psychiatric problem that a kid doesn’t actually have can definitely cause a kid to become anxious and depressed, but that’s not the same as being crazy. I see no evidence that Katz is crazy other than his mother thought he was crazy.

        Lion of the Blogosphere

        August 29, 2018 at 3:26 PM

      • I’m not an expert, but I think the answer to question 2 is yes. The medicines can do the opposite of the intended purpose, and unlike an adult, a kid can’t really say “no.” If a parent and doctor insist that a child needs the medicine, the child is going to take it. An adult can more easily recognize if the medicine is increasing anxiety rather than decreasing it, and stop.

        Stilicho

        August 29, 2018 at 4:22 PM

      • Ask a psychologist. They will suggest if it is indeed the right time to consider using psychiatric drugs. Psychologists do not write prescriptions. You will need to have a psychiatrist or a family doctor to write the prescription. Insist on getting baseline data for all likely side effects (thyroid function, blood sugar, cholesterol, creatinine, other kidney and liver functions etc.) before starting psychiatric drugs. Doctors are unlikely to be very diligent on this due to the conflict of interest. Remember that Psychiatry is mostly art and very little science.

        My 2¢

        August 29, 2018 at 4:54 PM

  2. “ I see no evidence that Katz is crazy other than his mother thought he was crazy.”

    Well, and shooting and killing a bunch of people. And all those psychiatric hospital visits, which they don’t do on a whim. But besides that, nope, nothing at all. *whistles*

    It seems likely, given the totality of the evidence, that his mother was correct, and dad was in extreme denial. As dad was a NASA engineer, he quite likely had some autistic tendencies that he passed on to his son, and to call the son out on those tendencies also implicated Dad’s behaviors. So dad would rather deny. Keep in mind that autism and schizophrenia are often comorbid.

    Kid was a nutter. Mom was correct. Dads stubbornness in this area probably contributed to the carnage.

    D

    August 29, 2018 at 3:43 PM

    • “Well, and shooting and killing a bunch of people”

      Soldiers to that. Are they crazy? No, they are patriotic and following orders.

      People can kill others for reasons we don’t approve of but aren’t caused by a break from reality.

      “Kid was a nutter. Mom was correct.”

      Mom called the police 26 times. Poor kid had anxiety and was bullied at school, but nothing more than that.

      Lion of the Blogosphere

      August 29, 2018 at 3:56 PM

      • 26 times in one day would be a lot.

        My 2¢

        August 29, 2018 at 4:57 PM

      • “Soldiers to that. Are they crazy? No, they are patriotic and following orders.

        People can kill others for reasons we don’t approve of but aren’t caused by a break from reality.”

        You are being silly. He wasn’t a soldier and he wasn’t following orders.

        And it isn’t a matter of not approving of his reasons but that he didn’t appear to have reasons that would make any sense to a sane person.

        And he also killed himself which sane people generally don’t do (unless they have a painful terminal illness or something).

        James B. Shearer

        August 29, 2018 at 9:57 PM

      • People actually describe the reasons for their suicide in suicide notes that accompany up to 50% suicides. However, good luck finding statistics on the suicide notes. They are not discussed/researched because would not put the society in good light.

        My 2¢

        August 30, 2018 at 12:45 AM


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