Lion of the Blogosphere

Thoughts on Star Trek TOS after re-watching half of the first season

Yes, there is a disappointment here. In my memory, the original Star Trek series was the greatest thing ever to air on TV. But the reality is that it’s actually not that good. What happened?

It would probably be accurate to say that the original Star Trek series was the greatest thing ever to air on TV as of the year 1979. Especially if you like science fiction. But even if you don’t care for science fiction, early television just wasn’t very good, and those of us old enough to remember it look back on it with rose-colored glasses.

Even when the next generation of Star Trek first aired in the 1980s, my reaction at the time was that it wasn’t as good as the original. How could that be? For starters, I was put off by the enhanced level of political correctness of TNG, the insistence that a robot should be treated as if he were human, the wimpiness of Picard compared to the brashness of Kirk.

Today, objectively, I can see that TNG has production values that are light years ahead of TOS. I think this wasn’t as obvious in the 1980s for two reasons:

(1) On crappy low-resolution analog over-the-air broadcasts on CRT televisions, the improvement over TOS weren’t as obvious, but it’s a lot more obvious when watching these episodes on Netflix with high-resolution screens. They did an amazing job cleaning up TOS and it looks way better than it did when I watched it over-the-air, but that has the unfortunate side-effect of giving me a better view of how hokey and cheap everything looked.

(2) Even up to the 1980s, the future hadn’t yet arrived. The control panels in TOS still looked believable, while the flashier TNG sets gave the impression that someone was trying too hard to make everything look futuristic. If you look at the interior of an actual real-world space vehicle, yes they have one on display at the Smithsonian Institution, it looks a lot more like a set from TOS and nothing at all like a set from TNG. But with hindsight, the people who created the sets for TNG did a pretty damn good job of imagining, if not the 24th century, at least the next thirty years The flashing screens in TNG don’t seem especially futuristic any more, while the sets in TOS look very old-fashioned. It now seems pretty ridiculous imagining that a future starship would have buttons all over the place.

My sophistication as a consumer of television has increased immensely since then. We now expect to see characters in TV series acting in a more subtle and naturalistic way, rather than the overacting prevalent on early TV, which was perhaps suited for small low-resolution screens with many viewers getting poor broadcast reception on top of that.

Computer and other technology has progressed fifty years, and with computers being a big part of Star Trek, it’s too easy to see what they got wrong about the future. A computer that you could talk to and would understand what you said, that seemed pretty impossible in the 1960s, but we are pretty close to that today. I think that in 10 years, Siri or Alexa will have just as good verbal comprehension as the Star Trek computers. Star Trek massively underpredicted computer automation. All those people on the bridge of Enterprise pushing buttons seems pretty unlikely, a future spaceship will surely just fly itself. And most of what passes for traveling through space on Star Trek as well as most other science fiction shows violates the laws of physics.

Star Trek should be credited for what they were able to accomplish given such an aggressive shooting schedule and such a low budget. The first season of Star Trek had 29 episodes, whereas a season of Game of Thrones has only ten or so episodes, created with a vastly larger budget.

So why continue with re-watching the original Star Trek series? I am still fascinated (to use one of Spock’s favorite words) by how much my expectations about television have changed. I’m old enough to feel the pull of nostalgia for things from my youth. My grandfather used to watch these ridiculous old Western movies on television, and now I see why he did that.

And there’s still a lot to learn about how society has changed since the 1960s. You may ask, wouldn’t it be better to see that from something that wasn’t science fiction? Yes, and no. Star Trek explored ideas that simply weren’t explored in other television at the time. Partially it was the science fiction theme that enabled that, but also television wasn’t a very sophisticated medium back then. It was mostly dumb entertainment for the masses. As badly as you may think Star Trek has aged, if you enjoyed the A-Team as a kid but try to watch it today, you won’t believe how you were ever able to watch that dreck. I suspect that I will not get much enjoyment out of any 1960s sitcoms. Were there any dramas from the 1960s other than western stuff like Rawhide, Bonanza, Gunsmoke, etc? I am open to suggestions. I think that I would enjoy Petyon Place, but there doesn’t seem to be anyway to watch it without buying the DVDs for $25.56 per five DVDs, which seems outrageous. The only 1960s show on Netflix is the Andy Griffith Show, which is said to be a pretty good show for the 1960s; maybe I should give it a try.

Written by Lion of the Blogosphere

August 29, 2018 at 3:00 PM

Posted in Star Trek, Television

66 Responses

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  1. “TNG has production values that are light years ahead of TNG”

    TNG had time travel, like Superman?

    TNG: TOS

    “If you look at the interior of an actual real-world space vehicle, yes they have one on display at the Smithsonian Institution, it looks a lot more like a set from TOS…”

    Everyone reading may take some time to consider that. When we went to space 50 YEARS ago the real spaceship looked like the original Star Trek.

    Now things look prettier and nothing gets done.

    Artifact

    August 29, 2018 at 3:08 PM

  2. The Wild Wild West was awesome in the 1960’s when it aired, when I was a young kid.

    Part Western part James Bond. I may have to try to see it as LOTB has with TOS and formulate an updated opinion of TWWW.

    Xcommenter

    August 29, 2018 at 3:10 PM

  3. The best 60’s sitcoms hold up really well. They couldn’t tell dirty jokes, so they had to try harder.

    As for 60s dramas, they are mostly pretty awful. I like TNG and DS9, but TOS is completely unwatchable for me. Just too stupid and fake looking.

    The exception to dramas being bad is the second run of Dragnet that started in 1966. I watched that in reruns as a kid, and last year rewatched a few episodes. They story-telling is great, relatively fast-paced, and you see a good description of how crime was committed and fought in late 60’s 90% white Los Angeles. Pronounced Los An-gel-eeees by some of the characters. Production values are high too, I love looking at the cars and well dressed 60’s people in full color.

    Straight-laced Joe Friday dressing down dirty druggie hippies has some camp value too, but the show is good enough to enjoy on that level as well as straight up.

    pop

    August 29, 2018 at 3:36 PM

  4. Check out The Fugitive, from ‘63-‘68. Still stands up great

    Steve

    August 29, 2018 at 3:46 PM

  5. I still think I Love Lucy, Leave it to Beaver, The original Flintstones, Gilligan’s Island, and The Munsters are funny. Andy Griffith has some good episodes. The Odd Couple is great, and Taxi and Sanford and Son aren’t bad, but I think they are the ‘70s.

    Gozo

    August 29, 2018 at 3:49 PM

    • Redd Foxx was hilarious in Sanford & Son.

      Lion of the Blogosphere

      August 29, 2018 at 3:57 PM

    • I concur. Beaver, Hillbillies, Mayberry, Andy Griffith, My Favorite Martian and I’ll add Rocky and Bullwinkle were all great and still are. I haven’t yet, but will someday go back and rewatch some Partridge Family, Wild Wild West and Bug Valley which were favorites at the time. I did rewatch a favorite of the time, Land of the Giants, but couldn’t get into it.

      I have been watching sporadically Dark Shadows, a daytime Gothic soap opera I didn’t watch at the time, but which I appreciate for its slow pace which appeals to me.

      You missed one big place where TOS got the future wrong: humans no longer do space travel.

      Curle

      August 30, 2018 at 1:55 AM

  6. Never cared for westerns, court dramas like Perry Mason or the cartoonish Lost in Space. Twilight Zone is probably the only 1960s era drama that I watch repeatedly.

    Brendan

    August 29, 2018 at 3:51 PM

    • Good point about Twilight Zone. That and Hitchcock Presents are both great, I forgot them when I bashed 60s dramas.

      pop

      August 29, 2018 at 6:01 PM

  7. What about the original Twilight Zone or Outer Limits? Both series hold up pretty well for shows aired over fifty years ago.

    Oswald Spengler

    August 29, 2018 at 3:56 PM

  8. Anthony

    August 29, 2018 at 4:04 PM

  9. Star Trek is a product of it’s time, and although a Millennial might enjoy Star Trek: Discovery, they would have a much harder time sitting down to watch TOS. It’s much more slow paced compared to modern TV. The same is true for movies. I doubt many of the movies made in the 30’s and 40’s would hold up today.

    Mike Street Station

    August 29, 2018 at 4:06 PM

    • I doubt many of the movies made in the 30’s and 40’s would hold up today

      My wife and I often specifically seek out very old movies because of how clean they are. Some gems can be found.

      S.J., Esquire

      August 29, 2018 at 4:25 PM

    • The slowness was one of the most notable things to me when I started watching TOS after watching all of TNG. TV became much more fast-paced in the intervening 18 years. And it’s already been more than 18 years since TNG ended.

      Hermes

      August 29, 2018 at 4:27 PM

    • King Kong ain’t slow! It’s as fast paced as the first Star Wars movie, one monster attack after another.

      Gozo

      August 29, 2018 at 8:47 PM

  10. I suppose that like I said, it goes to show that by today’s standards, this should be considered a kids’ or adolescents’ show. Which is not all bad, since the only Really Good stories are ones appreciable by children and grownups equally (like Narnia).

    All that notwithstanding, I hope you don’t stop the reviews. Some good ones are coming up!

    S.J., Esquire

    August 29, 2018 at 4:23 PM

  11. I had the same thought about older TV shows. Much of what you’ve criticized in these Star Trek reviews so far is just as true of Perry Mason or Bonanza or whatever.

    And whoever originally made that point a month or two ago about over-the-air reception on low-definition TV had a great point. It’s been forever since the thought of getting a less-than-perfect picture has ever occurred to me (unless a heavy storm passes through, in which case my DirecTV cuts out entirely.) But for most of my childhood, we didn’t have cable, and it was extremely rare to be able to watch TV without snow, ghosting, flickering lines moving down the screen, etc. We basically never got perfect reception.

    Hermes

    August 29, 2018 at 4:32 PM

  12. Lion, how well do you think the Star Trek films (Star Trek I-VI) starring the original Enterprise crew have held up?

    Oswald Spengler

    August 29, 2018 at 4:43 PM

    • I haven’t watched them in a long time. I guess I need to put that on my long to-watch list.

      Lion of the Blogosphere

      August 29, 2018 at 5:01 PM

      • Raj Koothrappali: Are you joking? Star Trek V is the standard against which all badness is measured!

        Sheldon Cooper: No; no, no. Star Trek V has specific failures in writing and direction while Star Trek I fails across the board: art direction, costuming, music, sound editing.

        – The Big Bang Theory: “The Lizard-Spock Expansion”

        In a later scene. Sheldon says “IV: The Voyage Home” was the best movie, while Raj goes, “Three words: Wrath. Of. Khan.”

        njguy73

        August 29, 2018 at 6:09 PM

  13. In the UK at least the late sixties and 1970s was the Golden Age of TV. Fawlty Towers, Monty Python, Steptoe and Son, Till Death Us Do Part, I Claudius, Pennies From Heaven, The World At War, Plays (yes Plays) such as Edna The Inebriated Woman, Cathy Come Home, The Naked Civil Servant., Civilisation, The Ascent of Man, numerous plays by Dennis Potter. (And the entirety of human existence could be summed up in twenty minutes of Benny Hill.)
    Nothing comes close today. Its not about props and special effects, its the acting and writing

    martin2

    August 29, 2018 at 5:11 PM

    • martin2 – must have been nice to have been British back then.

      njguy73

      August 29, 2018 at 6:05 PM

  14. Am tempted to counter every Star Trek post with a foreign music video.

    (This one is brief and elegant.)

    Justice Duvall

    August 29, 2018 at 5:54 PM

  15. >>Were there any dramas from the 1960s other than western stuff like Rawhide, Bonanza, Gunsmoke, etc? I am open to suggestions.

    Naked City (1958-1963), a police procedural drama, shot on the streets of New York City is pretty good. Restrained, realistic acting. The series improved over its run. You can have fun just picking out actors who would become 1960s-70s stars and superstars, getting some of their first roles on Naked City (Dustin Hoffman, Rip Torn, Martin Sheen, Peter Fonda, Carroll O’Connor, Alan Alda, James Caan, Robert Duvall and many more).

    I have heard that “Car 54, Where are You.” (1961-1963) also shot in New York City, is hilarious.

    Daniel Heneghan

    August 29, 2018 at 6:30 PM

    • Beverly hillbillies was a riot. Green Acres could be pretty funny too.

      I always thought it ridiculous how huge and roomy the Enterprise was inside. But I guess I’m used to real spacecraft that have to launch into space and all.

      Mrs Stitch

      August 29, 2018 at 8:57 PM

    • Good pick. I was gonna suggest that one.

      My mom is a huge fan of the Rifleman. Cheesy as hell, though.

      GondwanaMan

      August 29, 2018 at 9:55 PM

  16. Both dramas “I Spy” and “Route 66” hold up as dramas. I also liked sitcom “Dobey Gillis”, but I haven’t seen it in 30 years now. I too like the mid/late 60’s run of Dragnet.

    purpleslog

    August 29, 2018 at 9:01 PM

  17. Caring about “production values” is prole! Ever been to a play? A painted backdrop, a few props.. you are good to go. Early TV was often just teleplays. Twilight Zone is my favorite show, and it seems very staged. For people used to seeing plays, TV shows like Star Trek must have been pretty amazing. (By the way, if you like The Twilight Zone and have Netflix, you can check out “The Encounter” starring George Takei. It was banned pretty much as soon as it aired for being “racist”. Watching it now, I really don’t see much problem with it.)

    I loved the Bob Newhart Show back in the day, but it seems slow now and just mildly amusing. The Odd Couple has held up better, as has The Munsters. The Rockford Files and Hawaii 5-0 are still good. Peter Gunn is the oldest show I enjoy watching.

    Steverino@steverino.com

    August 29, 2018 at 9:28 PM

    • The Chicago Bob Newhart is pretty good, and some episodes of the New England Bob Newhart show.

      As a kid I loved Adam-12, which has lots of shooting and fast car driving.

      Gozo

      August 29, 2018 at 10:24 PM

      • I loved the opening to the original cop show SWAT from the 1970s …the police scanner, the sirens wailing, the funky instrumental theme, the SWAT team running to the SWAT can, then jumping through windows or rappelling down walls.

        Oswald Spengler

        August 30, 2018 at 2:56 PM

    • Broadway-level plays and musicals often have more elaborate sets and special effects.

      Dave Pinsen

      August 30, 2018 at 4:06 AM

    • “Caring about “production values” is prole!”

      Nah, it’s pseudo-hipster. Lion tries so hard to rise above his origins. Too hard.

      But it’s true, the truly upper class don’t care about production values. They focus on the script and the acting.

      And for this, RAWHIDE’s middle seasons were the epitome of Americana.

      gothamette

      August 30, 2018 at 10:32 AM

    • Everyone cares about production values. The only question is, how much.

      MoreSigmasThanYou

      August 30, 2018 at 12:14 PM

  18. Recommended TV series to watch from the 1960s through the 2000s:

    1960s:

    The Fugitive

    The Prisoner

    The Avengers

    1970s:

    Columbo

    The Rockford Files

    All in the Family

    1980s:

    The Equalizer

    Miami Vice

    Magnum, P.I.

    1990s:

    Nowhere Man

    The X-Files

    Twin Peaks

    2000s:

    Battlestar Galactica

    Deadwood

    Breaking Bad

    Oswald Spengler

    August 29, 2018 at 11:09 PM

  19. After Lion is finished with Star Trek, he can review Star Dreck, featuring Captain Jerk, Mr. Schlock, and Mr. Snot:

    Hermes

    August 29, 2018 at 11:30 PM

  20. If you look at the interior of an actual real-world space vehicle, yes they have one on display at the Smithsonian Institution, it looks a lot more like a set from TOS and nothing at all like a set from TNG. But with hindsight, the people who created the sets for TNG did a pretty damn good job of imagining, if not the 24th century, at least the next thirty years The flashing screens in TNG don’t seem especially futuristic any more, while the sets in TOS look very old-fashioned. It now seems pretty ridiculous imagining that a future starship would have buttons all over the place.

    Disagree with this somewhat. The touch screens on TNG didn’t look futuristic; they reminded me of the controls on an ‘80s microwave oven. I saw the 50th anniversary rerelease of 2001 last weekend and the set design blows away any of the Star Treks. Yeah, there are lots of buttons, but have you seen an airliner cockpit? Still lots of buttons there too. And for dramatic purposes, it’s no contest. Imagine this scene in 2001 with TNG touch screens.

    Dave Pinsen

    August 30, 2018 at 4:04 AM

    • “have you seen an airliner cockpit? Still lots of buttons there too”

      Intentional design to not rely too much on computers. You don’t Windows 10 to crash just as the plane is landing and the pilot loses all access to the controls.

      Lion of the Blogosphere

      August 30, 2018 at 12:01 PM

      • Intentional design to not rely too much on computers. You don’t Windows 10 to crash just as the plane is landing and the pilot loses all access to the controls.

        So why wouldn’t the same be true of a space ship?

        Dave Pinsen

        August 30, 2018 at 5:28 PM

  21. My grandfather would watch old Western movies on TV too. Sometimes if I was visiting he would get all excited “A Western is on”. Even if it was boring to me I would watch the Westerns with him and pretend I liked it. I have no regrets because it made him happy to watch those with me.

    Jay Fink

    August 30, 2018 at 7:38 AM

    • I identify with that too, because my mother is always watching stuff like The Andy Griffith Show or those old musical starring Bing Crosby and Fred Astaire. I’ve tended to find it annoying because those old shows and movies seem so slow and boring by today’s standards, but I understand when I contemplate the fact that it’s nostalgic for her the same way TNG or Seinfeld are for me.

      Speaking of Seinfeld, isn’t it crazy that there are now college students who weren’t born until after it ended? To today’s 20 year olds, Seinfeld is what the Brady Bunch was to me, something I couldn’t relate to because it was on before I was born.

      Hermes

      August 30, 2018 at 10:56 AM

      • College students today have no personal memory of 9/11. Ronald Reagan is just a distant historical figure of no relevance at all.

        Lion of the Blogosphere

        August 30, 2018 at 11:24 AM

      • Star Trek TOS was on before I was born, but I watched it in syndication. Seinfeld is still on in syndication. 11pm and 11:30pm on WPIX in New York. I watch it most nights.

        Dave Pinsen

        August 30, 2018 at 5:36 PM

      • I watch it most nights.

        I am not trying to be condescending here, but – really? My dad did the same thing when I was growing up (literally watched Seinfeld every night) and now that I’m an adult I can scarcely believe that he did it. Between a busy job and busy family, I can’t *imagine* watching TV regularly, let alone wasting precious hours of every evening on it. Seriously not trying to be a jerk, but – don’t you have better things to do?

        S.J., Esquire

        August 30, 2018 at 8:15 PM

      • I am not trying to be condescending here, but – really? My dad did the same thing when I was growing up (literally watched Seinfeld every night) and now that I’m an adult I can scarcely believe that he did it. Between a busy job and busy family, I can’t *imagine* watching TV regularly, let alone wasting precious hours of every evening on it. Seriously not trying to be a jerk, but – don’t you have better things to do?

        Such as what, commenting here?

        I’m usually doing something else while I’m watching it – responding to emails, that sort of thing. But I generally don’t have a very busy schedule between 11pm and midnight when it’s on.

        Dave Pinsen

        August 31, 2018 at 2:18 AM

    • There were elderly people still alive in the 1960s who were kids during the closing of America’s western frontier. Just think of the changes they witnessed over the course of their lifetimes…from stagecoaches and steam trains to supersonic aircraft and the moon landings in less than a century.

      Oswald Spengler

      August 30, 2018 at 11:20 AM

      • My dad was born in 1942 and is still alive and in excellent health. One of his earliest memories is when he was about six or seven and a distant relative visited him. She told him that when she was his age, so about seven, she remembered standing by the railroad track watching Abe Lincoln’s funeral train go by as it was taking his casket to Illinois.

        GMR

        August 30, 2018 at 3:50 PM

      • My great-great grandmother (1876-1982) and great-grandmother (1899-1993) both still spoke English with the infamous New York “er-oi merger” (“boiled in oil = berled in erl”).

        There’ are some great videos on YouTube of Richard Feynman (1918-1988, I think) talking — he has a perfect NYC accent for someone his age, but with the one difference being that he never does this. He must have been stigmatized for it as a kid and became conscious of it, whie retaining every other feature of the language he grew up with.

        Kyo

        August 31, 2018 at 1:55 PM

  22. next watch the Babylon 5 series. DS9 plagiarized much of it to the extent that a legal settlement was made. even to this day the character development, scene construction and film technique are excellent. the lower resolution currently available does not detract from viewing. each season produced a large number of episodes on a tight budget.

    it seems like video in general increases its pace after an initial golden era for a particular venue. the old History Channel had much longer, slower paced, lecture quality documentaries. now everything is short and fast paced, like a conspiracy to shorten people’s attention spans.

    Chris Stevenson

    August 30, 2018 at 11:31 AM

  23. “College students today have no personal memory of 9/11. Ronald Reagan is just a distant historical figure of no relevance at all.”

    We are now as distant from the riots at the 1968 Democratic convention as those cops and hippies were from the Hundred Days Offensive that ended the First World War in 1918.

    Oswald Spengler

    August 30, 2018 at 11:32 AM

  24. Of all the TV that I watched and enjoyed as a kid it is probably old American films like the Hope/Crosby ‘road to’ series and Laurel and Hardy that I can still watch and enjoy (along with the British classic ‘Carry On’ films).

    The worst? If I ever chance to see a few minutes of cartoons like Transformers and He Man they are so awful it gives me a headache. What was I actually enjoying? A Team is as you say nonsense, so is Airwolf, and Stringfellow Hawk now seems like a sulky prick whereas the 8 year old me thought that he was the epitome of macho cool. Street Hawk is boring. David Hasselhof makes Knight Rider bearable. I’d still give the Fall Guy and the Dukes of Hazzard the benefit of the doubt if I were to see them again.

    Sometimes I was allowed to stay up and watch adult programmes like Cheers and Moonlighting, and I will always love those series. Moonlighting is a forgotten classic IMO.

    Prolier Than Thou

    August 30, 2018 at 2:21 PM

    • Actually, maybe I was thinking of the Dukes of Hazzard.

      Lion of the Blogosphere

      August 30, 2018 at 2:45 PM

    • I loved Airwolf when I was in junior high. It was on Netflix a few years ago, and I streamed a few episodes. I could barely get through it, man was it bad. Not to mention the Libyan dudes were all white guys with towels on their heads.

      GMR

      August 30, 2018 at 3:54 PM

    • Dukes of Hazzard is wretched. Magnum PI and Remington Steele, on the other hand, I liked as a kid and still found enjoyable. Also Simon & Simon, which I hated as a 5 year old but was really pleased with when I watched about 30 episodes a couple years ago. Probably the greatest prole detective show ever made.

      Richard

      August 30, 2018 at 5:01 PM

  25. Somewhat OT:

    Wil Wheaton is now banned from Mastodon:
    https://archive.fo/Kb0YP

    In an early TNG episode, Q gives Riker his powers. Riker uses the powers to bestow gifts upon some of his fellow crewmen.

    Wesley’s gift is a ten-year age boost. In the blink of an eye, he goes from awkward teenage nerd to confident twentysomething jock:

    Sadly, things didn’t turn out that way in meatworld:

    Stan Adams

    August 30, 2018 at 8:28 PM

  26. The early days of television from around the 40s to early 60s had excellent writing, with a lot of anthology series such as Kraft Television Theatre producing weekly teleplays that had high quality scripts. I think its around the 60s when TV really started getting dumbed down for mass market appeal.

    Alex

    August 31, 2018 at 11:00 AM

  27. Lion, can you borrow DVDs from your Public Library system?

    https://www.nypl.org/books-music-movies

    MEH 0910

    August 31, 2018 at 2:30 PM

  28. The late 1950s & early 1960s had tough detective shows: 77 Sunset Strip, Peter Gunn, the early Perry Mason was very different in tone from the later episodes, Ripcord (lousy, IMHO), Seahunt (lousy), Route 66 (eh). As the ‘60s wore on that sort of thing faded away to superscience: Man from Uncle or glamour: Fame is the Name of the Game or police dramas: Ironside. Mannix, named for a real Hollywood fixer, was the last tough detective show I can recall.

    ErisGuy

    August 31, 2018 at 8:49 PM

  29. Give Andy Griffith a try. I think it is the most wholesome American show ever produced. It is good TV. The future equivalent was Boy Meets World. Both feature strong male leads and treat young males as men in progress.

    BS

    September 3, 2018 at 7:48 AM

  30. I was a teenager in the ‘70s, watching Trek in syndication in Sunday afternoons – there was no rhyme or reason to the order in which the episodes were shown. But eventually I found David Gerrold’s book “The World of Star Trek”, and got validation for what I was feeling but was too ashamed to admit – most of the episodes weren’t very good, and Gerrold actually said that, in print, and even said why the bad episodes were bad.

    This came in handy a few years later, when my friends and I were driving back to Hicksville after going to the Big City to see “Star Trek: The Motion Sickn^H^H^H^H^H Picture”, and I finally had the temerity to say, “That just wasn’t very good,”, and we all felt better having owned up to that assessment.

    And it came in handy again in several years later when I was with a different set of friends watching ST:TNG’s first several episodes, and I said that they basically sucked. And again we all felt better, no longer having to pretend that what we wanted to be true was actually true. When TNG concluded, I watched the last episode, and it still had all the same flaws, especially a shocking reliance on double talk deus ex machina.

    cthulhu

    September 7, 2018 at 11:35 PM


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