Lion of the Blogosphere

Meat Loaf – Paradise By The Dashboard Light

with 52 comments

They don’t make music like this anymore. One of the greatest duets ever.

A guy who looks like Meat Loaf would never make it big today.

It’s so old fashioned that he has to promise to marry the girl in order to have sex with her. That would never happen today.

Karla Devito has such an interesting look. She’s not the woman who recorded the vocals on the album. She’s lip-syncing to Ellen Foley who was a conventionally cute blonde.

Written by Lion of the Blogosphere

March 19, 2019 at EDT pm

Posted in Music videos

52 Responses

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  1. I don’t like the song or the act. Is Meatloaf gay? In second grade I had a classmate named deVito. She wasn’t very attractive and was what you’d call guido. And she had a voice like a 3-pack/day smoker, even at age 7.

    Marty

    March 19, 2019 at EDT pm

    • Shame on you for not liking Meat Loaf.

      Lion of the Blogosphere

      March 19, 2019 at EDT pm

      • In mitigation, I love Air Supply.

        Marty

        March 20, 2019 at EDT am

      • “In mitigation, I love Air Supply.”

        Wow. A reverse double back flip retort. To mitigate disliking one POS band while maintaining the validity of the original claim also claim affinity for another POS . Well done!

        Curle

        March 20, 2019 at EDT pm

      • Curle: listen up, and listen good.

        You don’t say one word about Air Supply ever again.

        Are we clear?

        njguy73

        March 20, 2019 at EDT pm

  2. OT: Lion, an update on the LA fine arts scene:

    Last month was huge with the launch of the 1st annual Frieze LA art fair and the art week that orbited it. Frieze is a contemporary fine arts magazine with a median HHI of >$150k (for those anxious to know) and this art fair puts LA on the global fine arts map. We were flooded with New Yorkers and Chinese but in a good way 😅

    Expect in the next 20 years to see more NYC galleries and artists (Moby is the loudest to date) moving out here where the rent is cheap and the weather is better, diluting the stupid Hollywood crowd and increasing the cachet of Los Angeles as a destination cosmopolitan city for the world’s ultra-wealthy (with fine art being their ecumenical sport).

    A Dilettante

    March 20, 2019 at EDT am

    • Nonsense.

      LA is already too expensive for artists.

      California also has a resale royalty for fine arts, which destroyed the market for living artists.

      What is the evidence that those high-dollar readers actually subscribe to Freize magazine, as opposed to having it sent to them involuntarily?

      Justice Duvall

      March 20, 2019 at EDT am

      • Good points. I can only add that the LA urban sprawl allows for artists to leave a SWPL lifestyle in Long Beach, Eagle Rock, Highland Park, NoHo…and the rest of the artists are trust funders who live on the Westside.

        A Dilettante

        March 20, 2019 at EDT am

    • As long as it doesn’t turn into the Miami Art Basel.

      a bee ee?

      March 20, 2019 at EDT am

    • I dated a girl in college who was into “the arts”. She imagined she had more talent than others and destined to be rich and famous. She was wrong on all counts. Such a shallow SWPL twit. Last I heard she was divorced and doing something menial. No schadenfreude. Just an acknowledgement that values have consequences. Artists and people enamored by that sort of thing have the wrong values.

      destructure

      March 20, 2019 at EDT pm

      • There are the posers who want to delude themselves into thinking they are above their own mediocrity and then there are those who treat Western fine art seriously, as a continuation and advancement of Western High Culture.

        A Dilettante

        March 20, 2019 at EDT pm

  3. I remember when they invited Meatloaf on for the finale of American Idol. To close the show, they had Meatloaf and Katherine McPhee do a live rendition of the song. Meatloaf was in prime form, at McPhee, who was a more natural musical drama performer than pop star anyway was more than up to the task. They fed off each other, with each trying to top the other’s over the top showmanship. It was one of the most amazing live television performances I’d ever seen…that is until they cut it off just a couple minutes in to the song to do some lame musical medely with all the other contestants and a bunch of other songs. I’ll never forget what we were denied that day, and that was pretty much the last time I ever watched network television.

    PerezHBD

    March 20, 2019 at EDT am

    • That’s surprising. I’ve always thought Meat Loaf was not actually a very good performer, and that his voice requires lots of retakes and studio doctoring to come out sounding good. I saw him on TV once in the nineties, and he sounded off-key. And here is a video of him performing “I’d Do Anything for Love” in 2007. He sounds (and looks) absolutely terrible.

      Hermes

      March 20, 2019 at EDT pm

      • A lot of people besides Meat Loaf haven’t aged well.

        Lion of the Blogosphere

        March 20, 2019 at EDT pm

      • He actually seems to look better than he did in his 20’s during Bat Out Of Hell. Lost weight (or at least he covers it better), better haircut.

        trey

        March 21, 2019 at EDT am

      • He’s 60 years old in this performance! How many classic rock tenors are still belting out live performances as strong as this at that advanced an age? And note the lust with which his hottie 20 something duet partner looks at him. As old and fat as he may have gotten, she can still sense the raw POWER of a true rock God.

        PerezHBD

        March 21, 2019 at EDT am

  4. I always found this song fascinating. Who could forget that line “we were glowing like the metal on the edge of a iknife?” But what made it interesting was that it ends up not with them getting divorced (as in Billy Joel’s “Scenes from an Italian restaurant”) but with the even more tragic result of him being unhappy for the rest of his life and wishing for death. Maybe by the late 70’s divorce was so common that the having them end up divorced wouldn’t have been depressing enough. But it’s ironic. He says he’ll “never break my promise or forget my vow.” Why not? It was standard 1970’s dogma that nothing mattered but the self and that all obligations could be abandoned in the pursuit of something better. I heard some couples were even pledging “as long as love shall last” instead of “until death do us part.” So the guy in this story must have been from a traditionalist family or culture. I guess the message is that if you want to live like a traditionalist, don’t have sex before you’re married. But even if I’m wrong about this third assumption, I’m probably right about the first two. And two out of three ain’t bad…

    Maryk (the g-loaded guidette)

    March 20, 2019 at EDT am

    • I agree that even in the 70s it was old fashioned, but in the 70s people remembered the 50s. Today, no one remembers the 50s except for people over the age of 70. Meat Loaf is 71.

      Lion of the Blogosphere

      March 20, 2019 at EDT am

  5. “A guy who looks like Meat Loaf would never make it big today.”

    Meat Loaf hit his peak popularity in the late 70s. MTV started up in 1981. Do the math.

    a bee ee?

    March 20, 2019 at EDT am

    • I noticed MTV crushed the popularity of one of my guilty pleasure favorites Christopher Cross. I am actually kind of in awe of how nice and harmless male musicians (and men in general) used to look like before the roids-n-tattoos look took over.

      Jay Fink

      March 20, 2019 at EDT pm

      • Christopher Cross’s Wikipedia Bio even includes a section entitled “The Curse of the MTV Generation.” Though they make it sound like the issue was his musical style, not his looks.

        When I look up pictures of Cross now, he looks to me kind of like a slovenly, Southern frat boy. The kind who would be performing bro country, not schmaltzy adult contemporary love songs.

        Hermes

        March 20, 2019 at EDT pm

      • True dat, but at least Christopher Cross had four big hits notched to his belt: Ride Like the Wind, Sailing, Think I’m Gonna Make It, and of course Arthur’s Theme, which, if I recall correctly, won the Oscar for Best Song of 1981.

        a bee ee?

        March 22, 2019 at EDT pm

    • Mr. Loaf’s size was basically his _schtick_ when he got started. If he weren’t so big he might not have gotten as much attention.

      Peter

      ironrailsironweights

      March 20, 2019 at EDT pm

  6. Ellen Foley was on Night Court too, however she reached her peak singing on Hitsville UK by the Clash.

    JMcG

    March 20, 2019 at EDT am

  7. Never underestimate a guy that looks like Meat Loaf. He wasn’t the “norm” back in the ’70’s and 80’s. But there were a slew of us that thought he was sexy as HELL! The long hair,the bedroom eyes,the voice, the tux, the heart, soul, power and passion that he put into each and every performance. Noooo, don’t ever underestimate a man like that. He’s the one that will steal your girl’s heart.

    Theresa Worley

    March 20, 2019 at EDT pm

    • He was the white Teddy Pendergrass?

      Commercial-Residential

      March 20, 2019 at EDT pm

  8. I don’t care much for the song Paradise BTDL, probably because I’m a prude and never got laid in high school, but I give Meatloaf credit for having some special talent with song writing and showmanship. I particularly like the early parts of Two Out of Three, “I’ve been looking for a ruby in a mountain of rocks” is worthy to enter the lexicon, and the following “But there ain’t no Coupe de Ville hiding at the bottom of a Cracker Jack box”, is a surprise and a delight. Things like that make a song a thrill to listen to twenty years after you first heard it.

    Old Prude

    March 20, 2019 at EDT pm

    • Apparently Mr. Loaf does have some songwriting credits on some of his lesser songs, but “Paradise by the Dashboard Light” and all his other big hits were written solely by Jim Steinman.

      Hermes

      March 20, 2019 at EDT pm

      • Good for Mr. Steinman, then! I still give Meatloaf credit for putting them across in a memorably apt fashion.

        Old Prude

        March 21, 2019 at EDT pm

  9. This looks like an appropriate place to reference Video Killed the Radio Star. 80’s music was so much better than today’s. People can say 80’s music was silly, hokey or whatever. But the music today is just terrible and all sounds the same. Research suggests that even millennials prefer older music to today’s. Music used to be original. But today they just keep using the same formula over and over.

    https://metro.co.uk/2019/02/07/millennials-prefer-music-20th-century-golden-age-pop-today-research-reveals-8462993/

    destructure

    March 20, 2019 at EDT pm

    • There is actually a great deal of really good music still being made. Just none of it is on the radio or TV. It takes a little more effort to find the good stuff, because it’s not being spoon-fed [force fed] to you on mass media and pop culture, but the rewards are great. But, yes, pop-music is crap, and modern country is barf-making and repetitive. One more complaint: All the female country singers sound like teeny-boppers. What ever happened to the Women? Where is Sammi Smith? Tammy Wynette? Emmylou? Nothing but the twittering of fourteen-year olds.

      Old Prude

      March 21, 2019 at EDT pm

  10. Meatloaf. One of the greatest songwriter and singer ever

    don Pfister

    March 20, 2019 at EDT pm

    • Meat Loaf, not Meatloaf. The former is the rock star, the latter is what proles eat for dinner.

      Lion of the Blogosphere

      March 20, 2019 at EDT pm

      • I can’t believe you corrected that guy’s spelling of Meat Loaf without correcting him on who was writing all those songs.

        onetwothree

        March 20, 2019 at EDT pm

      • Oh, I see I have been in error, sir. Meat Loaf. One prig to another.

        Old Prude

        March 21, 2019 at EDT pm

      • Wasn’t trying to be a prig. I never mention typos.

        BUT, Meat Loaf vs meatloaf was just too funny to ignore, sorry.

        Lion of the Blogosphere

        March 21, 2019 at EDT pm

  11. Meatloaf was good on Ted Nugent’s Free for All album, which is far, far away from that theatrical … stuff he did with Jim Steinman. I’ve never seen Roadie. I wonder how Mr Loaf, as the Times would call him, did in that movie. Probably well, because the cliche is that the worse the musician, the better the actor.

    Carducci

    March 20, 2019 at EDT pm

  12. Jack Black was pretty big not too long ago while doing is comedy band. It sorta looks like Mr. Loaf.

    Return of Shawn

    March 20, 2019 at EDT pm

  13. I remember seeing a video some years ago when he looked like he had a lost of weight and therefore didn’t look too bad. Cocaine?

    I can’t find the video, but IIRC it looked like it was shot in a small TV studio.

    curri

    March 20, 2019 at EDT pm

  14. Hot Rod Hearts

    This song is a guilty pleasure for me:
    Another 80’s hit about love in automobiles:

    I loved it in the ’60s when they wrote songs about cars.
    Of course back then most cars and pick-ups still had bench seats,
    so you could drive and hold your sweetie at the same time.

    Robbie Dupree – Hot Rod Hearts

    Hot Rod Hearts
    Ten miles east of the highway
    Hot sparks burnin’ the night away
    Two lips touchin’ together
    Cheek to cheek sweatshirt to sweater
    Young love born in a back seat
    Two hearts pound out a back beat
    Headlights, somebody’s comin’
    Got to move
    Keep a runnin’ with the hot rod hearts
    Out on the boulevard tonight
    Here come those hungry sharks
    Up from the bottom for another bite
    School girl brushes her hair back
    Blue jeans can’t hide the bare facts
    Bad boy knows where to find her
    Runs the light, sneaks up behind her
    Here come those hungry sharks
    Up from the bottom for another bite
    True believers livin’ on the borderline
    They’re just dreamers killin’ time
    Killin’ time, killin time
    Times are…

    Of course I admit to liking the 70’s hit, “Brandy” too.
    Which has now been revived by “Guardians of the Galaxy”.

    Looking Glass – Brandy (You’re a Fine Girl)

    Nedd Ludd

    March 21, 2019 at EDT am

  15. Forgot to mention: not only would it never happen today that the girl would press him for a promise of marriage before yielding to sex, if he brought up any sort of commitment before they’d even had sex for the first time, she would lose interest, seeing him as creepy and desperate.

    Hermes

    March 21, 2019 at EDT am

    • What guy has EVER mentioned commitment before, during or after trying to get a piece? That WOULD be weird and creepy. Maybe Trump would ask for the non-disclosure to be signed, but that’s about it as close as it gets.

      Old Prude

      March 21, 2019 at EDT pm

      • Why would it be creepy? Out of the ordinary, yes (even for the 1970’s.) But creepy? I don’t see why.

        Maryk (the g-loaded guidette)

        March 21, 2019 at EDT pm

      • “after trying to get a piece..”

        It sounds as if you’re talking about a porterhouse steak.

        Maryk (the g-loaded guidette)

        March 21, 2019 at EDT pm

      • It’s not weird or creepy if you’re a conservative religious person. And there was a lot more conservative religiosity pre-1970’s.

        Hermes

        March 21, 2019 at EDT pm

      • I’m a prude. I didn’t want to say “of a**”, Sorry, fellows. Even religious guys have hormones, and though they might defer to the wishes of the maiden, they won’t be the one initiating discussion of commitments. Too much fire down below. But I do appreciate the sentiment.

        Prude’s wife has gotten involved in 23andMe, and there sure are a lot of previously unknown cousins coming from those romantically moral days of the fifties. So, based on that circumstantial evidence, No: Those old-timers were not asking for commitments prior to knowing a gal.

        Old Prude

        March 22, 2019 at EDT pm

  16. “Bat Out of Hell” (the album) is the greatest musical channeling of teenage angst, yearning and horniness ever put to vinyl. Every song on it is great.

    peterike

    March 21, 2019 at EDT pm

  17. Looking Glass were a Rutgers and Jersey Shore hard rock band whose one hit wonder didn’t suit them. Some of their members moved into a metal band, Starz, which was supposed to be good. There was a long interview with them in the New Jersey Star Ledger around 2000. The best part is when they all testified that they knew Springsteen from his club days in the band Steel Mill. They said Bruce was the best guitarist, easily the equal of Jimmy Page or Robbie Robertson, and they couldn’t understand why he underplayed his guitar skills during his post-1970 career.

    Carducci

    March 21, 2019 at EDT pm

  18. BTW Lion, “Bat Out of Hell II: Back Into Hell,” is a great album. A worthy successor to the first record.

    peterike

    March 22, 2019 at EDT pm


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