Lion of the Blogosphere

A videogame-based IQ test?

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2019-03-19/a-harvard-dropout-s-plan-to-fix-college-admissions-with-video-games

That’s basically what this article is talking about. But “IQ” is not mentioned once in the article. So I am rather stumped. Doesn’t everyone know how much the liberal elite (which controls everything these days) hates the idea of IQ tests? If there’s an IQ test, it means that blacks will perform much worse on it than whites, and they will say it is racially biased. Or will a computer-based IQ test finally prove to everyone that lower black IQ is not caused by lack of education, because we all know that blacks actually play a lot more videogames than upper-middle-class white kids whose parents strictly limit their “screen” time.

Raymond B. Cattell came up with the concept of “crystallized g” and “fluid g.” A test of crystallized g would be like the verbal portion of the SAT because it’s heavily influenced by knowing a lot of vocabulary words and having experience doing lots of reading. In English. A lot of people think it would be great if there was a way to test intelligence totally independent of schooling or environment. My opinion has been that it’s a fool’s errand, and that we should embrace tests of crystallized g as the best way to test intelligence. The so-called “Flynn effect,” to my understanding, has been based on tests of fluid g. While IQ according to Flynn was increasing, verbal SAT scores were decreasing. Decreasing intelligence would be predicted by society’s dysgenic fertility. (I believe that the decline in math SAT scores has been temporarily halted by the massive increase in teaching to the test that began in the 2000s, because the math SAT is more susceptible to improvement through intense coaching.)

But there’s none of that in the article, just “golly-gee-whiz, this is better than the SAT, and a lot of people have invested in it.” But I predict that if any sort of test becomes as “high stakes” as the SAT, then an industry will arise around prepping people for it, and it will be discovered that the video-game-based test is even more influenced by coaching and prepping than the traditional SAT. And I also predict that SJWs will shut it down because they will say that the test discriminates against blacks.

Written by Lion of the Blogosphere

March 27, 2019 at 9:55 AM

Posted in Biology

19 Responses

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  1. The more I deal with the admissions process for elite schools, the more fair I think it is – provided everyone fully understands it – which of course they don’t. Making people jump through extra hoops weeds out people who aren’t willing to jump through all those hoops. Some people who have an IQ that fits Harvard don’t have a personality or motivation level that fits Harvard.

    MoreSigmasThanYou

    March 27, 2019 at 10:44 AM

    • When I was in high school, I was clueless about a lot of it, as were my parents. They were probably like Chinese parents today who don’t get all of the subtle class-based stuff and “leadership.” Even if they read about it on the internet, they don’t fully grok it.

      Lion of the Blogosphere

      March 27, 2019 at 10:52 AM

      • I 100% agree. What we typically call ‘confident and poised’; they would think of as having never learned manners. They actually have to unlearn some cultural values. On the other hand, Chinese are big on copying everything their teachers do (including mannerisms). So the real hang-up would be getting parents to divert money from useless things like piano lessons to a useful college coaching service that would ‘teach to the test’ for admissions.

        I think society has to expect high school students to be clueless. They’re sort of like the baby in the trio of The Baby, The Immigrant and The Guy On Mushrooms. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qdBg2rs7mUw Students should get adequate services for navigating the system. Of course students will never get that from high school guidance councilors, as long as those guidance councilors are schmucks who make $36k a year. It’s hard to teach someone else how to be a success when you’re a failure.

        MoreSigmasThanYou

        March 27, 2019 at 11:25 AM

      • Typical high school guidance councilor:

        MoreSigmasThanYou

        March 27, 2019 at 11:26 AM

      • I’m trying not to trip your benevolent censorship filter, but in my personal life I may be dealing with someone who’s beyond a normal level clueless, and could be a passive-aggressive un-coachable type; albeit un-coachable with a really high IQ. If this kid displays a pattern of sabotaging my attempts to get him into an Ivy, then that’s going to support my statement about the process being more fair than I gave it credit for in the past.

        MoreSigmasThanYou

        March 27, 2019 at 11:43 AM

    • I think that your opinion on fairness is nul considering that, as you state: “everyone doesn’t fully understand it”. Which vastly undersells how many people don’t understand it.

      In general, only people who have parents that went through it or were culturally close enough to those who did will have a chance at understanding it. College counselors even at the best private high schools tend to be a mixed bag (they tend to stick underperforming teachers in that role). I personally know of one truly dumb kid (a high school soccer recruit who was left back one year when he was recruited) who got into Penn, neither on academics or sports, merely because his lower class father became so actively involved in the prep school community. The last that I heard the kid is now a gay stripper. I’m not kidding.

      Jon

      March 27, 2019 at 11:26 AM

      • Jon,

        So true.

        “Which vastly undersells how many people don’t understand it.” Yeah, hardly anyone understands it. Even the people who understand it best are pretty open about how difficult it is to understand perfectly. Each university’s admissions standards are slightly different, and those standards change slightly from one year to the next. Also a number of top universities have multiple undergraduate schools. For example, Lion’s alma mater has: The College of Arts and Sciences, The School of Nursing, Penn Engineering, The Wharton School. It’s possible that someone who would be admitted to one, could be rejected by another.

        “In general, only people who have parents that went through it or were culturally close enough to those who did will have a chance at understanding it.” Exactly.

        “College counselors even at the best private high schools tend to be a mixed bag (they tend to stick underperforming teachers in that role).” That explains a lot.

        MoreSigmasThanYou

        March 27, 2019 at 12:52 PM

    • ‘Making people jump through extra hoops weeds out people who aren’t willing to jump through all those hoops. ‘

      Yep, it selects for phonies. I’ve never failed to fail it and am proud of myself for it. The phonies always instinctively felt my independence and lack of ageebaleness to their phoniness.I laugh at all these agreable phony bastards. Who needs them? Most people become phonies later on in life, but to be groomed to be one from childhood? That’s crazy.

      Yakov

      March 27, 2019 at 1:05 PM

      • Yakov,

        Yeah, I agree with that too. You don’t have to be a phony because you work in the trades, and you’re a small businessman who can fire his customers. Being an office worker is a lot like being a courtier. That’s why I find François de La Rochefoucauld to be an amazingly modern writer.

        Rising to the top in the office is a lot like rising to the top in the court of Louis the 14th. If we’re training people to get that corner office, they’ll have to avoid career limiting moves. With corporations giving a nod to SJW values, every “successful” person must brush up on their phoniness.

        Essentially, we have an SJW elite full of people who are motivated by envy, spite, narcissistic self loathing, desire for power, desire for prestige, and the desire to bully others. They hide their agenda with words like “awareness”, “justice”, and “tolerance”. What better way to train the next generation than to teach them to start lying to others and themselves before they leave high school?

        For example: writing an essay about how you want to join National Honor Society because of all the volunteering opportunities, when in fact you’re doing it to pad your college resume.

        There’s a chess club at school, and you don’t even like chess? Join it so that you can try to become president. That counts as leadership on your college application. You get winded walking across the cafeteria to throw out your lunch tray. Join the tennis club and try to become ombudsman. The ombudsman doesn’t actually do anything, but it’s another leadership activity, and the sports tie in makes you “well rounded”.

        Having spent years going the extra mile while going along to get along, should be conclusive proof that you aren’t that one disagreeable employee who will ruin the office’s 100% donation rate to the United Way, or blurt out something inappropriate during a meeting with important stakeholders, thus embarrassing your manager. I want to hear about how important socially responsible ethical business practices are; and how your personal commitment to those socially responsible ethical business practices is helping to shift paradigms while transforming our global community.

        Please for the love of god don’t tell me I’m a phony, or I’ll have to call one of the priestesses of phoniness in HR.

        MoreSigmasThanYou

        March 27, 2019 at 2:51 PM

      • Peterson makes the point that the 2 most influential things to how “far one goes in life” are IQ and the personality trait “agreeableness”.

        gda53

        March 27, 2019 at 5:21 PM

      • We need to define what’s agreeableness that we are talking about.

        Yakov

        March 27, 2019 at 8:16 PM

    • Clearly, they’re looking for prodigies of compliance rather than independent thinkers. That makes perfect sense since the main goal of schools like that is to fill the higher ranks of law firms, investment banks, corporate boardrooms and the like. Candidates for the Yes Man Olympics.

      Crazy Jimmy

      March 27, 2019 at 5:16 PM

  2. the name of the startup is “imbellus”. Oh my lord.

    uman

    March 27, 2019 at 10:59 AM

  3. You’d think crystallized g would be both useful and predictive for most occupations beyond hunting and gathering.

    Mrs Stitch

    March 27, 2019 at 11:12 AM

    • I think it’s pretty useful for hunting and gathering too. That could have been what it evolved for in the first place.

      MoreSigmasThanYou

      March 27, 2019 at 1:10 PM

      • A couple studies apparently found no correlation between male hunting success and G in hunter-gatherers.

        bobbybobbob

        March 27, 2019 at 2:46 PM

      • bobbybobbob,

        That seems hard to believe. Any links to abstracts?

        MoreSigmasThanYou

        March 27, 2019 at 3:49 PM

  4. A lot of people think it would be great if there was a way to test intelligence totally independent of schooling or environment. My opinion has been that it’s a fool’s errand, and that we should embrace tests of crystallized g as the best way to test intelligence.

    Fluid tests are needed to compare individuals from different cultures & species & just to prove scientifically that individual differences in IQ are not artifacts of education.

    The so-called “Flynn effect,” to my understanding, has been based on tests of fluid g.

    There may have been some genuine increase in fluid ability (especially of the spatial type) caused by prenatal nutrition. The remaining Flynn effect on so-called fluid tests is likely caused by schooling which is ironic since fluid tests are designed to minimize acquired knowledge, and they do; but in my opinion some “fluid” power tests like the raven require the kind of intellectual motivation & confidence one acquires in school & educated people better grasp the instructions.

    pumpkinperson

    March 27, 2019 at 2:27 PM

  5. if i were on shark tank i would pass. it’s hard enough designing these tests in print form, let alone make a videotape around them.

    grey enlightenment

    March 27, 2019 at 4:47 PM


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